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Story 1: Character Matters — Eulogy at George H.W. Bush Funeral — Videos —

Presidential historian Jon Meacham delivers eulogy at George H.W. Bush funeral

President George HW Bush’s funeral – Fmr Canadian PM Brian Mulroney delivers his eulogy

Alan K. Simpson delivers eulogy at George H.W. Bush’s funeral

Former President George W. Bush delivers final eulogy at father’s funeral

 

28 minutes ago
1 of 22

Former President George W. Bush becomes emotional as he speaks at the State Funeral for his father, former President George H.W. Bush, at the National Cathedral, Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, Pool)

WASHINGTON (AP) — The nation bid goodbye to George H.W. Bush with high praise, cannon salutes and gentle humor Wednesday, celebrating the life of the Texan who embraced a lifetime of service in Washington and was the last president to fight for the U.S. in wartime. Three former presidents looked on at Washington National Cathedral as a fourth — George W. Bush — eulogized his dad as “the brightest of a thousand points of light.”

His plane, which often serves as Air Force One, arrived at Ellington Field outside Houston in late afternoon.

The national funeral service at the cathedral was a tribute to a president, a patriarch and a faded political era that prized military service and public responsibility. It was laced with indirect comparisons to President Donald Trump but was not consumed by them, as speakers focused on Bush’s public life and character — with plenty of cracks about his goofy side, too.

Trump sat with his wife, a trio of ex-presidents and their wives, several of the group sharp critics of his presidency and one of them, Hillary Clinton, his 2016 Democratic foe. Apart from courteous nods and some handshakes, there was little interaction between Trump and the others.

George W. Bush broke down briefly at the end of his eulogy while invoking the daughter his parents lost in 1953 and his mother, who died in April. He said he took comfort in knowing “Dad is hugging Robin and holding Mom’s hand again.”

The family occupied the White House for a dozen years — the 41st president defeated after one term, the 43rd serving two. Jeb Bush stepped up to try to extend that run but fell short when Trump won the 2016 Republican primaries.

The elder Bush was “the last great-soldier statesman,” historian Jon Meacham said in his eulogy, “our shield” in dangerous times.

But he took a lighter tone, too, noting that Bush, campaigning in a crowd in a department store, once shook hands with a mannequin. Rather than flushing in embarrassment, he simply quipped, “Never know. Gotta ask.”

Meacham recounted how comedian Dana Carvey once said the key to doing an impersonation of Bush was “Mr. Rogers trying to be John Wayne.”

None of that would be a surprise to Bush. Meacham had read his eulogy to him, said Bush spokesman Jim McGrath, and Bush responded to it with the crack: “That’s a lot about me, Jon.”

The congregation at the cathedral, filled with foreign leaders and diplomats, Americans of high office and others touched by Bush’s life, rose for the arrival of the casket, accompanied by clergy of faiths from around the world. In their row together, Trump and former Presidents Barack Obama, Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton stood with their spouses and all placed their hands over their hearts.

Alan Simpson, former Republican senator from Wyoming, regaled the congregation with stories from his years as Bush’s friend in Washington. More seriously, he recalled that when he went through a rough patch in the political game, Bush conspicuously stood by him against the advice of aides. “You would have wanted him on your side,” he said.

George W. Bush, Laura Bush, Michelle Obama Barack Obama, Jummy Carter Rosalynn Carter, Bill Clinton, Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump Melania Trump

The flag-draped casket of former President George H.W. Bush is carried by a military honor guard past dignitaries at the Washington National Cathedral. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Simpson said Bush “loved a good joke — the richer the better. And he threw his head back and gave that great laugh, but he never, ever could remember a punchline. And I mean never.”

George W. Bush turned the humor back on the acerbic ex-senator, saying of the late president: “He placed great value on a good joke, so he chose Simpson to speak.”

Meacham praised Bush’s call to volunteerism, placing his “1,000 points of light” alongside Abraham Lincoln’s call to honor “the better angels of our nature” in the American rhetorical canon. Meacham called those lines “companion verses in America’s national hymn.”

Trump had mocked “1,000 points of light” last summer at a rally, saying “What the hell is that? Has anyone ever figured that one out? And it was put out by a Republican, wasn’t it?”

Former Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney praised Bush as a strong world leader who helped oversee the end of the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet Union and helped bring about the North American Free Trade Agreement with Canada and Mexico, signed into law by his successor, Clinton.

With Trump, a bitter NAFTA critic, seated in the front row, Mulroney hailed the “largest and richest free trade area in the history of the world.” The three countries have agreed on a revised trade agreement pushed by Trump.

Earlier, a military band played “Hail to the Chief” as Bush’s casket was carried down the steps of the U.S. Capitol, where he had lain in state. Family members looked on as servicemen fired off a cannon salute.

His hearse was then driven in a motorcade to the cathedral ceremony, slowing in front of the White House, the route lined with people much of the way, bundled in winter hats and taking photos.

Waiting for his arrival inside, Trump shook hands with Obama and former first lady Michelle Obama, who greeted him by saying “Good morning.” Trump did not shake hands with Bill and Hillary Clinton, who looked straight ahead.

Bill Clinton and Mrs. Obama smiled and chatted as music played. Carter was seated silently next to Hillary Clinton in the cavernous cathedral. Obama cracked up laughing at someone’s quip. Vice President Mike Pence shook Carter’s hand.

Trump tweeted Wednesday that the day marked “a celebration for a great man who has led a long and distinguished life.”

Bush’s death makes Carter, also 94 but more than 100 days younger, the oldest living ex-president.

Following the cathedral service, the hearse and its long motorcade drove to the National Mall to pass by the World War II Memorial, a nod to the late president’s service as a World War II Navy pilot, then transferred his remains at Joint Base Andrews for the flight home to Texas with members of his family.

Bush will lie in repose at St. Martin’s Episcopal Church before his burial Thursday.

On Tuesday, soldiers, citizens in wheelchairs and long lines of others on foot wound through the Capitol Rotunda to view Bush’s casket and honor a president whose legacy included a landmark law affirming the rights of the disabled. Former Sen. Bob Dole, a compatriot in war, peace and political struggle, steadied himself out of his wheelchair and saluted his old friend and one-time rival.

Trump ordered the federal government closed Wednesday for a national day of mourning. Flags on public buildings are flying at half-staff for 30 days.

___

Associated Press writer Darlene Superville contributed to this report.

https://apnews.com/0e443c78c337423db71b9270303888c1

‘That’s a lot about me, Jon’: Presidential biographer Jon Meacham reveals how George H.W. Bush humbly reacted after he read his eulogy to the former president before his death

  • Meacham has been praised for his moving tribute to Bush Senior on Wednesday  
  • Spoke of the day Bush’s plane was shot down during WWII and only he survived
  • Said Bush lived his life asking ‘Why me?’ and wanted to prove himself ‘worthy’ 
  • Meacham also spoke of Bush Senior and Barbara’s incredible 73-year-marriage 
  • And recalled moment Bush broke down in tears while meeting child with cancer 

Before President George H.W Bush passed away, he had the chance to hear the eulogy written for him by his biographer and old friend Jon Meacham.

Meacham would deliver the same tribute to the 41st president on Wednesday, moving the audience as he spoke of the important events in Bush’s 94 years of life.

But when the humble Texan heard Meacham’s stirring words, he simply replied: ‘That’s a lot about me, Jon’.

Meacham spoke at length about the moments that shaped Bush, including his time as a pilot for the US Navy in World War II, his long love for wife Barbara, and his enduring legacy as a president of the United States.

‘On his watch, a wall fell in Berlin, a dictator’s aggression did not stand, and doors across American opened to those with disabilities,’ Meacham told the assembled mourners.

SCROLL DOWN FOR VIDEO AND JON MEACHAM’S EULOGY IN FULL 

Presidential biographer Jon Meacham delivered a stirring eulogy to George HW Bush during the 41st president's funeral on Wednesday morning 

Presidential biographer Jon Meacham delivered a stirring eulogy to George HW Bush during the 41st president’s funeral on Wednesday morning

Meacham spoke of Bush's time as a pilot for the US Navy during World War II, his love of wife Barbara, and his enduring legacy as a president of the United States

Meacham spoke of Bush’s time as a pilot for the US Navy during World War II, his love of wife Barbara, and his enduring legacy as a president of the United States

NBC host Willie Geist revealed how Bush responded after Meacham read him the stirring eulogy before his death 

NBC host Willie Geist revealed how Bush responded after Meacham read him the stirring eulogy before his death

Meacham opened his eulogy at the Washington National Cathedral on Wednesday with a moment that would define Bush Senior for the rest of his life.

It was September 2, 1944. Bush, just 20 years old at the time, was a Navy lieutenant in the thick of World War II.

‘The story was almost over even before it had fully begun,’ Meacham said.

‘Lieutenant Junior Grade George Herbert Walker Bush, joined by two crew mates, took off from the USS San Jacinto to attack a radio tower on Chichijima.’

‘As they approached the target, the air was heavy with flack. The plane was hit. Smoke filled the cockpit, flames raced across the wings. “My god,” Lieutenant Bush thought, “This thing’s gonna go down.”’

‘Yet he kept the plane in its 35-degree dive, dropped his bombs, and then roared off out to sea, telling his crew mates to hit the silk. Following protocol, Lieutenant Bush turned the plane so they could bail out.’

Meacham, seen here walking past Bush's casket, has been resoundingly praised for his poetic and touching tribute to a man he knew for decades 

Meacham, seen here walking past Bush’s casket, has been resoundingly praised for his poetic and touching tribute to a man he knew for decades

Bush parachuted from the cockpit, smacking his head on the tail of the plane as the wind propelled him backwards.

He plunged into the ocean and lifted himself onto a tiny raft.

‘His head bleeding, his eyes burning, his mouth and throat raw from salt water, the future 41st President of the United States was alone,’ Meacham told the crowd.

‘Sensing that his men had not made it, he was overcome. He felt the weight of responsibility as a nearly physical burden. And he wept.’

A submarine would rescue Bush from the water, setting the course of history.

‘George Herbert Walker Bush was safe. The story, his story and ours, would go on by God’s grace,’ Meacham continued.

It was a moment that stayed with Bush for the rest of his life. He asked himself, almost every single day, why it was he who was spared.

‘In a sense, the rest of his life was a perennial effort to prove himself worthy of his salvation on that distant morning,’ Meacham said.

Meacham could be seen shaking George W Bush's hand after delivering the moving eulogy for his father at the National Cathedral 

Meacham could be seen shaking George W Bush’s hand after delivering the moving eulogy for his father at the National Cathedral

Meacham praised Bush as 'America's last great soldier-statesman, a 20th century founding father' during his eulogy 

Meacham praised Bush as ‘America’s last great soldier-statesman, a 20th century founding father’ during his eulogy

‘To him, his life was no longer his own. There were always more missions to undertake, more lives to touch, and more love to give. And what a headlong race he made of it all. He never slowed down.’

Meacham praised Bush as ‘America’s last great soldier-statesman, a 20th century founding father’ who ‘governed with virtues’ seen in the likes of George Washington, John Adams, and FDR – ‘men who believed in causes larger than themselves’.

He also compared Bush to Abraham Lincoln, saying that both presidents ‘called on us to choose the right over the convenient, to hope rather than to fear’.

‘Because life gave him so much, he gave back again and again and again,’ Meacham told the crowd at one point.

‘He stood in the breach in the Cold War against totalitarianism. He stood in the breach in Washington against unthinking partisanship. He stood in the breach against tyranny and discrimination.’

Meacham also spoke lovingly of Bush’s 73-year marriage to Barbara Bush, revealing he called his wife ‘Barb’, ‘the silver fox’, or ‘the enforcer’.

Meacham became close with the Bush family as he worked on the president's life story. He is pictured here shaking Bush's hand and holding a copy of the biography 

Meacham became close with the Bush family as he worked on the president’s life story. He is pictured here shaking Bush’s hand and holding a copy of the biography

Bush (pictured with Meacham and Bob Dole in December 2016) handpicked the biographer to deliver the eulogy, as well as his son George W Bush, former Wyoming senator Alan Simpson, and former Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney

Bush (pictured with Meacham and Bob Dole in December 2016) handpicked the biographer to deliver the eulogy, as well as his son George W Bush, former Wyoming senator Alan Simpson, and former Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney

‘He was the only boy she ever kissed. Her children, Mrs Bush liked to say, always wanted to throw up when they heard that,’ Meacham said as the crowd laughed.

‘In a letter to Barbara during the war, young George HW Bush had written, “I love you, precious, with all my heart, and to know that you love me means my life. How lucky our children will be to have a mother like you.”’

‘And as they will tell you, they surely were.’

Robin Bush, the three-year-old daughter that Bush and Barbara lost to leukemia, was mentioned throughout Wednesday’s ceremony – including during Meacham’s eulogy.

The biographer recalled a visit that Bush paid to Krakow, Poland while serving as vice president under Ronald Reagan.

It was there that he met a small boy who was sick with the same cancer that had taken his little girl.

Meacham spoke at length of the day Bush was nearly killed among his men while flying with the Navy in World War II. Bush (pictured here in his cockpit during WWII) spent the rest of his life asking himself 'Why Me?' 

Meacham spoke at length of the day Bush was nearly killed among his men while flying with the Navy in World War II. Bush (pictured here in his cockpit during WWII) spent the rest of his life asking himself ‘Why Me?’

Meacham also joked about comedian Dana Carvey's famous impersonation of Bush on SNL 

Meacham also joked about comedian Dana Carvey’s famous impersonation of Bush on SNL

Meacham read a diary entry that Bush had written that day, revealing he had burst into tears upon meeting the boy.

‘Behind me was a bank of television cameras. And I thought, “I can’t turn around. I can’t dissolve because of personal tragedy in the face of the nurses that give of themselves every day.” So I stood there looking at this little guy, tears running down my cheek, hoping he wouldn’t see. But if he did, hoping he’d feel that I loved him.’

Meacham also had a few light-hearted tales to tell of Bush, including once when he remarked that ‘fluency in English is something that I’m often not accused of’.

‘When he realized his mistake, he said, ‘Never know. Gotta ask,” Meacham said as the crowd laughed.

‘You can hear the voice, can’t you? As Dana Carvey said, the key to a Bush 41 impersonation is Mr. Rogers trying to be John Wayne.’

All four living presidents, as well as a number of foreign dignitaries, attended Bush's funeral in Washington DC on Wednesday morning 

Meacham concluded his stirring eulogy by returning to the very moment he opened it. A young Bush, alone in the water, asking ‘Why me?’

‘The workings of providence are mysterious, but this much is clear,’ Meacham began.

‘George Herbert Walker Bush, who survived that fiery fall into the waters of the Pacific three quarters of a century ago, made our lives and the lives of nations freer, better, warmer, and nobler.’

‘That was his mission. That was his heartbeat. And if we listen closely enough, we can hear that heartbeat even now.’

‘For it’s the heartbeat of a lion, a lion who not only led us, but who loved us. That’s why him. That’s why he was spared.’

JON MEACHAM’S FULL EUOLOGY TO GEORGE H.W. BUSH

The story was almost over even before it had fully begun. Shortly after dawn on Saturday, September 2, 1944, Lieutenant Junior Grade George Herbert Walker Bush, joined by two crew mates, took off from the USS San Jacinto to attack a radio tower on Chichijima. As they approached the target, the air was heavy with flack. The plane was hit. Smoke filled the cockpit; flames raced across the wings. ‘My god,’ Lieutenant Bush thought, ‘this thing’s gonna go down.’ Yet he kept the plane in its 35-degree dive, dropped his bombs, and then roared off out to sea, telling his crew mates to hit the silk. Following protocol, Lieutenant Bush turned the plane so they could bail out.

Only then did Bush parachute from the cockpit. The wind propelled him backward, and he gashed his head on the tail of the plane as he flew through the sky. He plunged deep into the ocean, bobbed to the surface, and flopped onto a tiny raft. His head bleeding, his eyes burning, his mouth and throat raw from salt water, the future 41st President of the United States was alone. Sensing that his men had not made it, he was overcome. He felt the weight of responsibility as a nearly physical burden. And he wept. Then, at four minutes shy of noon, a submarine emerged to rescue the downed pilot. George Herbert Walker Bush was safe. The story, his story and ours, would go on by God’s grace.

Through the ensuing decades, President Bush would frequently ask, nearly daily, he’d ask himself, ‘why me? Why was I spared?’ And in a sense, the rest of his life was a perennial effort to prove himself worthy of his salvation on that distant morning. To him, his life was no longer his own. There were always more missions to undertake, more lives to touch, and more love to give. And what a headlong race he made of it all. He never slowed down.

On the primary campaign trail in New Hampshire once, he grabbed the hand of a department store mannequin, asking for votes. When he realized his mistake, he said, ‘Never know. Gotta ask.’ You can hear the voice, can’t you? As Dana Carvey said, the key to a Bush 41 impersonation is Mr. Rogers trying to be John Wayne.

George Herbert Walker Bush was America’s last great soldier-statesman, a 20th century founding father. He governed with virtues that most closely resemble those of Washington and of Adams, of TR and of FDR, of Truman and of Eisenhower, of men who believed in causes larger than themselves. Six-foot-two, handsome, dominant in person, President Bush spoke with those big strong hands, making fists to underscore points.

A master of what Franklin Roosevelt called the science of human relationships, he believed that to whom much was given, much is expected. And because life gave him so much, he gave back again and again and again. He stood in the breach in the Cold War against totalitarianism. He stood in the breach in Washington against unthinking partisanship. He stood in the breach against tyranny and discrimination. And on his watch, a wall fell in Berlin, a dictator’s aggression did not stand, and doors across America opened to those with disabilities.

And in his personal life, he stood in the breach against heartbreak and hurt, always offering an outstretched hand, a warm word, a sympathetic tear. If you were down, he would rush to lift you up. And if you were soaring, he would rush to savor your success. Strong and gracious, comforting and charming, loving and loyal, he was our shield in danger’s hour.

Now, of course, there was ambition, too. Loads of that. To serve, he had to succeed. To preside, he had to prevail. Politics, he once admitted, isn’t a pure undertaking; not if you want to win, it’s not. An imperfect man, he left us a more perfect union.

It must be said that for a keenly intelligent statesman of stirring, almost unparalleled, private eloquence, public speaking was not exactly a strong suit. ‘Fluency in English,’ President Bush once remarked, ‘is something that I’m often not accused of.’ Looking ahead to the ’88 election, he observed inarguably, ‘it’s no exaggeration to say that the undecideds could go one way or the other.’ And late in his presidency, he allowed that ‘we are enjoying sluggish times, but we are not enjoying them very much.’

His tongue may have run amuck at moments, but his heart was steadfast. His life code, as he said, was ‘Tell the truth. Don’t blame people. Be strong. Do your best. Try hard. Forgive. Stay the course.’ And that was and is the most American of creeds. Abraham Lincoln’s ‘better angels of our nature’ and George H.W. Bush’s ‘thousand points of light’ are companion verses in America’s national hymn. For Lincoln and Bush both called on us to choose the right over the convenient, to hope rather than to fear, and to heed not our worst impulses, but our best instincts.

In this work, he had the most wonderful of allies in Barbara Pierce Bush, his wife of 73 years. He called her ‘Barb,’ ‘the silver fox’-and when the situation warranted-‘the enforcer.’ He was the only boy she ever kissed. Her children, Mrs. Bush liked to say, always wanted to throw up when they heard that. In a letter to Barbara during the war, young George H.W. Bush had written, ‘I love you, precious, with all my heart, and to know that you love me means my life. How lucky our children will be to have a mother like you.’ And as they will tell you, they surely were.

As Vice President, Bush once visited a children’s Leukemia ward in Krakow. Thirty-five years before, he and Barbara had lost a daughter, Robin, to the disease. In Krakow, a small boy wanted to greet the American Vice President. Learning that the child was sick with the cancer that had taken Robin, Bush began to cry.

To his diary later that day, the Vice President said this: ‘My eyes flooded with tears. And behind me was a bank of television cameras. And I thought, ‘I can’t turn around. I can’t dissolve because of personal tragedy in the face of the nurses that give of themselves every day.’ So I stood there looking at this little guy, tears running down my cheek, hoping he wouldn’t see. But if he did, hoping he’d feel that I loved him.’

That was the real George H.W. Bush, a loving man with a big, vibrant, all-enveloping heart. And so we ask, as we commend his soul to God, and as he did, ‘Why him? Why was he spared?’ The workings of providence are mysterious, but this much is clear: that George Herbert Walker Bush, who survived that fiery fall into the waters of the Pacific three quarters of a century ago, made our lives and the lives of nations freer, better, warmer, and nobler.

That was his mission. That was his heart beat. And if we listen closely enough, we can hear that heartbeat even now. For it’s the heartbeat of a lion, a lion who not only led us, but who loved us. That’s why him. That’s why he was spared.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6464705/Jon-Meacham-delivers-stirring-eulogy-George-HW-Bushs-funeral.html

 

Story 2: What is A Globalist? — Videos —

 

George H. W. Bush New World Order Quotes

What Is a Globalist?

Why Globalism Threatens Western Civilization | G. Edward Griffin and Stefan Molyneux

G. Edward Griffin on Trump, Secret Societies, Collectivism, Bitcoin and Taking The Red Pill

Super rich are in a conspiracy to rule the world – G. Edward Griffin – 2007

The Many Tentacles Of Globalism – How The New World Order Enslaves Us

Bush Sr debates New World Order with Ross Perot

Convention flashback: ‘Read my lips …’

Fallout from George H.W. Bush breaking ‘no new taxes’ pledge

 

Globalism

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Globalism refers to various systems with scope beyond the merely international. The term is used by detractors of globalization such as populist movements. While primarily associated with world-systems, other things with global reach have also been so described.

Historically, it has been associated with international endeavours begun after World War II, such as the United Nations and the European Union, and also sometimes the later neo-liberal and neoconservative policies of “nation building” and military interventionism between the end of the Cold War in 1992 and the beginning of the War on Terror in 2001.

Contents

  • 1Definitions and interpretations
  • 2History of the concept
  • 3See also
  • 4References
    • 4.1Works cited
  • 5Further reading
  • 6External links

Definitions and interpretations

Paul James defines globalism, “at least in its more specific use, … as the dominant ideology and subjectivity associated with different historically-dominant formations of global extension. The definition thus implies that there were pre-modern or traditional forms of globalism and globalization long before the driving force of capitalism sought to colonize every corner of the globe, for example, going back to the Roman Empire in the second century AD, and perhaps to the Greeks of the fifth-century BC.”[1]

Manfred Steger distinguishes between different globalisms such as justice globalism, jihad globalism, and market globalism.[2] Market globalism includes the ideology of neoliberalism. In some hands, the reduction of globalism to the single ideology of market globalism and neoliberalism has led to confusion. For example, in his 2005 book The Collapse of Globalism and the Reinvention of the World, Canadian philosopher John Ralston Saul treated globalism as coterminous with neoliberalism and neoliberal globalization. He argued that, far from being an inevitable force, globalization is already breaking up into contradictory pieces and that citizens are reasserting their national interests in both positive and destructive ways.

Alternatively, American political scientist Joseph Nye, co-founder of the international relations theory of neoliberalism, generalized the term to argue that globalism refers to any description and explanation of a world which is characterized by networks of connections that span multi-continental distances; while globalization refers to the increase or decline in the degree of globalism.[3] This use of the term originated in, and continues to be used, in academic debates about the economic, social, and cultural developments that is described as globalization.[4] The term is used in a specific and narrow way to describe a position in the debate about the historical character of globalization (i.e. whether globalization is unprecedented or not).

During the election and presidency of United States president Donald Trump, Trump and members of his administration used the term globalist on multiple occasions. Critics claimed that the administration used the term as an anti-Semitic “dog whistle” term referring to members of a Jewish conspiracy.[5][6][7][8][9]

History of the concept

The word itself came into widespread usage, first and foremost in the United States, from the early 1940s.[10] This was the period when US global power was at its peak: the country was the greatest economic power the world had ever known, with the greatest military machine in human history.[11] As George Kennan‘s Policy Planning Staff put it in February 1948: “[W]e have about 50% of the world’s wealth but only 6.3% of its population. […] Our real task in the coming period is to devise a pattern of relationships which will permit us to maintain this position of disparity”.[12] America’s allies and foes in Eurasia were suffering the dreadful effects of World War II at this time.

In their position of unprecedented power, US planners formulated policies to shape the kind of postwar world they wanted, which, in economic terms, meant a globe-spanning capitalist order centered exclusively upon the United States.[13]

The first person in the United States to use the term economic integration in its modern sense (i.e. combining separate economies into larger economic regions) did so at this time: one John S. de Beers, an economist in the US Treasury Department, towards the end of 1941.[14] By 1948, economic integration was appearing in an increasing number of American documents and speeches.[15] Paul Hoffman, then head of the Economic Cooperation Administration, made the most marked use of the term in a 1949 speech to the Organisation for European Economic Co-operation.[15] As The New York Times put it,

Mr Hoffmann used the word ‘integration’ fifteen times or almost once to every hundred words of his speech. It is a word that rarely if ever has been used by European statesmen having to do with the Marshall Plan to describe what should happen to Europe’s economies. It was remarked that no such term or goal was included in the commitments the European nations gave in agreeing to the Marshall Plan. Consequently it appeared to the Europeans that “integration” was an American doctrine that had been superimposed upon the mutual engagements made when the Marshall Plan began …[16]

While ideologies of the global have a long history, globalism emerged as a dominant set of associated ideologies across the course of the late twentieth century. As these ideologies settled, and as various processes of globalization intensified, they contributed to the consolidation of a connecting global imaginary.[17] In their recent writings, Manfred Steger and Paul James have theorized this process in terms of four levels of change: changing ideas, ideologies, imaginaries and ontologies.[18]

See also

References …

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Globalism

 

New World Order

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

New World Ordernew world order or The New World Order may refer to:

 

Books

  • The New World Order (Wells), a 1940 book by H. G. Wells promoting a post-World War II new world order uniting the world and bringing peace
  • The New World Order (Robertson), a 1991 book by Pat Robertson presenting a conspiracy theory in which Christians are targeted for persecution
  • The New World Order of Islam, (Urdu: Nizam-e-Nau), an address delivered in 1942 by Mirza Mahmood Ahmad, the second Caliph of the Ahmadiyya movement in Islam (later published as a book); being a comparative appraisal of Islam’s solution to the problem of socio-economic inequality in the world
  • The New World Order, a 1944 book by Maulana Muhammad Ali arguing that only Islam can establish lasting world peace
  • The Gulf Crisis and the New World Order is a 1990 book comprising a series of seventeen sermons delivered by Mirza Tahir Ahmad, the fourth Caliph of the Ahmadiyya Islamic movement
  • The New World Order, a 1990 book by A. Ralph Epperson presenting a Masonic New World Order conspiracy theory
  • The New World Order, a 2004 science fiction novel by Ben Jeapes
  • The New World Order: Facts & Fiction, a 2010 book by Mark Dice analyzing NWO conspiracy theories

Music

Other media

See also

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_World_Order

 

 

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