Whimsiest of tweets affecting Wall Street

05-12-2018 18:12

I heard an old  saying repeated last night (1 News) – “When America sneezes the world catches a cold”.

Another saying could now be appropriate – “When Donald Trump tweets Wall street sneezes”.

Wall Street went up when the US and China seemed to come to an agreement to avert more tariff increases, but it has dipped after Trump tweets raised uncertainty.

Bloomberg: China Swings Into Action on Trade as Trump Ups Pressure for “Real Deal”

U.S. President Donald Trump said China is sending “very strong signals” following weekend trade discussions in Argentina, as uncertainty remains over what commitments were made between the two nations.

Beijing will start to quickly implement specific items where there’s consensus with the U.S. and will push forward on trade negotiations within the 90-day “timetable and road map,” the Ministry of Commerce said in a statement on Wednesday morning in China.

Hours later, Bloomberg News reported that officials have begun preparing to restart imports of U.S. soybeans and liquefied natural gas — the first sign confirming the claims of Trump and the White House that China had agreed to start buying some U.S. products “immediately.”

Global markets cheered the weekend accord on Monday, only to reverse course Tuesday as doubts emerged over exactly what the world’s two largest economies had agreed on.

NY Times: Trump Warns China He’s “Tariff Man,” Spooking Stock Investors

The trade war is back on — at least as far as investors are concerned.

Stocks sank on Tuesday, as President Trump threatened China with further tariffs, just days after the two countries agreed to a cease-fire in their escalating economic conflict. Referring to himself as a “Tariff Man,” Mr. Trump, in a series of tweets, deepened the murkinesssurrounding the trade agreement, while members of his economic team talked down the prospects of a broad deal.

The fear is that a lasting trade war will undermine the global growth at a time when some of the world’s largest economies are already slowing down, and the United States, a standout performer, is also expected to slow.

Stock markets always go up and down, sometimes seemingly for the flimsiest of reasons.

Add to that are fluctuations now due to the whimsiest of tweets.

The worry is that a whopper of a whimsy may precipitate a stock market slide down a slippery slope.

 

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