11 Of Our Best Weekend Reads

20 Jan 19
The Junk Drawer

We tried for almost a full two years to get pregnant before we found out Audrey was on the way. Since we conceived at a time when science said we shouldn’t have been able to conceive, we were never 100% on her timing. Her estimated due date was January 7, 2019, but she measured ahead […]

20 Jan 19
Sport Archyves

Fulham vs Tottenham 101 forecast for great goals: Fulham 1-2 Tottenham Tottenham Hotspur will try to get back on track without the talisman Harry Kane. He is expected to miss the ankle for the rest of the month because of an ankle. In fact, Mauricio Pochettino faces a number of injury problems prior to his […]

20 Jan 19
Foster Love

Happy New Year ! At this point I’m more than a TAD late in wishing you all the best in 2019, but sick kiddos and just the general everyday chaos of 4 little ones age 4 and under has kept me distracted from ever finishing this blog post. I’ve lost count of how many times […]

19 Jan 19
Tifzone

Please do visit REVERSE SPEECH in the CIA READING ROOM. Click The Shield Below–  Source Used— *Read each reversal in the transcript then you can listen to its corresponding audio file by clicking the Mp3 below it. If you are having trouble making out what the words are saying, follow along reading the reversal from […]

19 Jan 19
Just me

Ok, so I just started this thing I don’t really know what I’m doing ,I have no type of experience in bloging I never read a blog in my life so I’m going to start this thing and see where it goes …so I’m actually a Gringa living in South America Chile and I was […]

19 Jan 19
saintandrewstwinflame

FRANCE 60 examples of police abuse of Yellow Vests Prosters #GiletsJaunes 1,976 views 261 4 Share Save The Outer Light Published on Jan 17, 2019 Recently a journalist, Sotiri Dimpinoudis, curated a large collection of examples of police brutality on Yellow Vest protesters on their twitter account – linked below – I go over these […]

19 Jan 19
Investors First Read

INVESTORS first read.com – Daily edge before the open DJIA:24,706 S&P 500: 2,670 Nasdaq Comp.:7,157 Russell 2000:1,482 Tuesday, January 21, 2019 (Posted on Saturday, Jan. 19 at 4:45 p.m.) …………………….. gbifr79@gmail.com ……………………. Sept. 21, 2018 : Raise cash to 50% (DJIA: 26,656) Nov. 8, 2018: Raise cash to 75% (DJIA: 26,180) Dec. 26, 2018 Doom […]

19 Jan 19
Life With a Bookworm

We are officially more than half way through January, and I still haven’t talked about my most anticipated releases for this year. So this is exactly what this post is going to do! There are so many incredible books coming out this year, so I will definitely have missed some, these aren’t going to be […]

19 Jan 19
Blue Quadrivium

She was, as if, forcing the earth down repeatedly with the palms of her hands,”This is hell and when we leave here we go to Heaven”, and she flicked her wrists upward. Obviously a church goer and when your girlfriend makes a serious statement you should probably listen. When you both leave the Louvre and […]

19 Jan 19
No Trace Tourism

Hello Readers, I recently returned from a 5000km road trip to Arizona, and along the way I tried to make a few key sustainability choices to reduce my impact as a road tripper. Firstly, I knew that with 22+ hours of driving each direction, many stops at coffee shops would be made, and I wanted […]

19 Jan 19
Archy Worldys

Hello my name is John Cherwa and welcome to our horse racing newsletter when we learn that McKinzie is skipping the Pegasus World Cup. Before we come to our weekly handicap lesson Rob Henie, let's give some news from one of our favorite horses. McKinzie, winner of the last Malibu stakes, will skip the Pegasus […]

19 Jan 19
Travelyn the World

I decided to make this section a separate post because these two areas are a bit more involved in terms of planning. For other Taroko things, check out Part 1 and Part 2 of this post series! Zhuilu Old Trail requires a permit application before you’re allowed to hike it, and this is limited to […]

19 Jan 19
SCNG
L.A. City Hall was a ghost town on Friday, save for Mayor Eric Garcetti and representatives for both Los Angeles Unified School District and United Teachers Los Angeles, though you wouldn’t know it. Since 10:57 a.m., they were mostly locked in negotiations behind two closed double-doors marked “Private.” Their goal? To end a giant teacher strike that has shaken the region over six days and across the district’s more than 1,000 k-12 schools and 720 square miles. It’s impossible to know what was happening in the third day of confidential negotiations between the district and the union, which are being mediated by Garcetti, but bits of information were gleaned as some negotiators sporadically filtered in and out of the room. Read full LAUSD strike coverage here When Steve Zimmer, former LAUSD school board president and an adviser to Garcetti, briefly emerged from the room to grab a bite to eat, he shook his head when asked if the public could expect an agreement this weekend. “Stranger things have happened,” he said, before disappearing behind the double-doors, leaving behind an empty hallway. @LAschools is glad to be back in contract negotiations with UTLA. We need to solve this soon and get educators and all of our students back in the classroom. pic.twitter.com/1HSS9JFJjV — L.A. Unified (@LASchools) January 20, 2019 Though that doesn’t mean City Hall was quiet by any stretch. The women’s march, which had a stage and performers setup on the steps outside, echoed through empty hallways into the early afternoon. As one negotiator stepped out to take a phone call, he said they could hear the march from the bargaining table. He noted that the crowd size was a far cry from the massive 60,000 person teacher strike rally seen one day earlier in the same location. Friday’s rally was the culmination of five days of striking for the union. That night, Garcetti called negotiations “productive” in a tweet and noted that they wrapped up a little after 9 p.m. On Saturday, just before 11 a.m., both bargaining teams were back in City Hall for more closed-door negotiations. Yesterday the voices of over 60,000 members, students, parents & community members could be heard inside the walls of City Hall. What happens outside bargaining, decides what happens in bargaining. FEEL YOUR POWER! Your bargaining team does! #UTLAStrike #LAUSDStrike #UTLAStrong pic.twitter.com/tpUG3n8sMP — United Teachers Los Angeles (@UTLAnow) January 19, 2019 Throughout the day, Garcetti filtered in and out of the room. He declined to say anything about the negotiations and stressed that they were confidential. Later, he was seen on stage in front of City Hall where he addressed the strike. “They deserve justice and we will get it this weekend,” he said. “Let’s hear it for the teachers.” As he spoke, an abundance of well-worn signs reading “We Stand With LA Teachers” dotted the crowd in nearby Grand Park. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] On the national stage, former L.A. Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa took to the pages of the Washington Post in an opinion piece on Friday, urging the two sides to come to a resolution. “Instead of fighting here in Los Angeles, we should be working together to advocate more funding from our leaders in Sacramento,” he wrote, noting that 90 percent of LAUSD’s budget comes from the state. “In two generations, California has gone from leading the country in education funding to being near the bottom, and we need to tell our legislators that this is unacceptable.” His calls were echoed by LAUSD superintendent Austin Beutner, who stressed that the district and union need to come to an agreement over the weekend. “We need our educators and our students back in school on Tuesday morning,” Beutner said. “So the onus is on us. The onus is on us as leaders to do what we have to do in the next 48, 72 hours to make sure schools are open and educators and students are back in school on Tuesday.” (Monday is a day off at public schools to observe Martin Luther King Jr Day.) Beutner insisted that the district does not have the money to fully meet the demands of UTLA, but said he is prepared to talk throughout the weekend “to do what we have to do to make sure schools are open on Tuesday.” UTLA teachers went on strike Monday, calling for increased pay, smaller class sizes and the hiring of more support staff such as nurses, counselors, and librarians. It was the first strike in 30 years, which lasted nine days in 1989. The district hired 400 substitutes during the strike. Additionally, 2,000 administrators with teaching credentials have been reassigned to classrooms. As the strike progressed throughout the week, school attendance plummeted. On Monday, 156,774 students attended school. By Friday, only 57,663 students showed up — a sliver of the district’s half million total students. The district estimated that it lost over $28 million on Friday, bringing the total revenue lost over the strike to more than $125 million. That’s slightly offset by about $10 million a day in salaries that aren’t being paid to striking teachers. The two sides hadn’t spoken until Thursday after UTLA rejected an offer from LAUSD one week earlier. That deal included the hiring of 1,200 teachers, capping middle and high school English and math classes at 39 students, capping grades four through six at 35 students, maintaining all other existing class sizes, adding a full-time nurse at every elementary school, and adding another academic counselor at high schools. “This represents the best we can do, recognizing that it is our obligation to provide as much resources as possible to support our students in each and every one of our schools,” Beutner said last Friday. UTLA officials rejected the proposal, saying it did not go far enough to bolster school staffing, reduce class sizes and prevent them from increasing in the future. The union also blasted the district’s staff-increase proposal for being only a one-year offer, and contended the district’s salary increase proposal is contingent on benefit cuts to future union members. The LAUSD has offered teachers a 6 percent raise spread over the first two years of a three-year contract while UTLA wants a 6.5 percent raise that would take effect all at once, one year sooner than initially planned. The union disputes the district’s claim it cannot afford more extensive investment in school staffing, pointing to what it calls an estimated $1.8 billion reserve fund and insisting the district has not faced a financial deficit in five years. The district contends that reserve fund is already being spent, in part on the salary increase for teachers. No details have been released about potential revised contract offers that may have been placed on the table since negotiations resumed on Thursday. Staff writer Ariella Plachta and City News Service contributed to this story.
19 Jan 19
Kindergarten in Kuwait

4:36 am – Alarm goes off. Snooze. 4:40 am – Alarm goes off again, and I can’t snooze it this time because it’s the call to prayer outside my window and it is very loud. 5:30 am – Breakfast at my neighbor’s apartment. 6:00 am – The bus heads to school. My mornings start way […]

19 Jan 19
World's Today's News

It's great day Grimsby on Tuesday, January 22! To honor the occasion, which usually goes without mention, Grimsby Live are noticing 13 celebrities or acquaintances of Grimsby and Cleethorpes who made us proud. From a record world record to an award-winning actress, maybe someone from our list could inspire you to do something amazing! Kevin […]