2020 Census

18 Jul 19
Ramblings of an Occupy Liberal

New York Post : House holds AG Barr, Ross in contempt over 2020 census citizenship question. https://nypost.com/2019/07/17/house-holds-ag-barr-ross-in-contempt-over-2020-census-citizenship-question/

18 Jul 19
Hawaii News Digest

Welcome to the “Hawaii State News” update from Hawaii News Digest. Views expressed in this Hawaii News summary are those of the reporters and correspondents. Content, including text, photos, images, and video, provided by the “Honolulu Star-Advertiser.” Accessed on 18 July 2019, 0400 UTC, Post 19215. Source:  https://www.staradvertiser.com/category/breaking-news/ Please scroll down to read your selections. […]

18 Jul 19
Global News

The action marks an escalation of Democratic efforts to use their House majority to aggressively investigate the inner workings of the Trump administration.

18 Jul 19
CBS 17 | Raleigh, Durham, Fayetteville news and weather | CBS17.com
The Democratic-controlled House on Wednesday voted to hold Attorney General William Barr and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross in criminal contempt of Congress for failing to comply with subpoenas about the origins of a controversial citizenship question on the 2020 census.  The measure passed by a vote of 230 to 198, with four Democrats joining all Republicans in voting against the resolution. One independent, Rep. Justin Amash, joined Democrats in voting for the measure. House Oversight Committee chairman Elijah Cummings, who spearhead the drive, said he did not take this decision “lightly.” The Maryland Democrat said he wanted to avoid holding cabinet-level officials in contempt of Congress — something he called a “serious and somber matter.” “But in this case, the Attorney General and Secretary Ross have blatantly obstructed our ability to do congressional oversight into the real reason Secretary Ross was trying — for the first time in 70 years — to add a citizenship question to the 2020 Census,” Cummings said Wednesday.  The White House immediately blasted the move, calling it “yet another lawless attempt to harass the President and his Administration.” The Justice Department also slammed the effort.  “Holding the Attorney General in contempt for working in good-faith with Congress marks a new low for Speaker Pelosi’s House of Representatives,” Justice Department spokesperson Kerri Kupec wrote in a statement. “This vote is nothing more than a political stunt. While the House plays games, the Department will continue its critical work of pursuing justice and ensuring safety for all Americans.” Ross, meanwhile, called the contempt vote a “PR stunt” that “further demonstrates their unending quest to generate headlines instead of operating in good faith with our Department.” Just before the House was to vote, Barr and Ross had urged House Speaker Nancy Pelosi in a letter to postpone it. “By taking this action, the House is both unnecessarily undermining inter-branch comity and degrading the constitutional separation of powers and its own institutional integrity,” Barr and Ross said. The vote follows the president’s announcement that he will not be adding the question to the upcoming census questionnaire and instead plans to explore other avenues to gain information about respondents’ citizenship status.  The Supreme Court handed down its decision late last month, effectively blocking the administration from adding the question, ruling the government had failed to provide adequate justification for the question. Multiple legal battles over the question, however, are still being waged in lower courts.    The House Oversight Committee approved a resolution by a vote of 24-15 to hold Barr and Ross in contempt after they continued to refuse to turn over documents related to the controversial question. The Justice Department, in response, said it would ask Mr. Trump to invoke executive privilege over the census documents if the committee decided to proceed with its contempt vote.   Democrats had criticized the administration’s push to add the question in recent months, noting the question would likely discourage immigrants from answering the census, which in turn could result in an undercount and subsequent reduction in the number of congressional seats allocated in primarily Democratic states. Ross claimed the move to include the question was a response to a request from the Justice Department for better citizenship data to assist in its enforcement of the landmark Voting Rights Act of 1965.  But weeks before the Supreme Court ruled on the census question, information emerged in one of the legal challenges to the census question revealing that a GOP political consultant, Thomas Hofeller, recently deceased, had concluded that the inclusion of the citizenship question would allow the drawing of political maps to benefit “Republicans and Non-Hispanic Whites.” According to plaintiffs, he then pushed the Trump transition team to add the question and ghostwrote a portion of a draft of the letter the Justice Department sent the Commerce Department in late 2017. The revelation contradicted Ross’ claim that the citizenship data would be used to help enforce the Voting Rights Act. Democrats sought the documents related to the decision-making behind the proposed change to the census, but it did not receive them. Barr affirmed that the 2020 census will not include a question on citizenship, explaining that “the problem is that any new decision would be subject to immediate challenge,” which would cause a delay in the census. In the meantime, Mr. Trump has ordered all federal government agencies and departments to provide data they have about citizens and non-citizens to the Commerce Department. Tennessee man charged after deputies say he admitted to having sex with a dog Mothers of men missing make plea for help after car found abandoned in Raleigh Armed robbery in Orange County results in multi-agency chase, police say Woman accidentally breaks ‘cancer-free’ bell in excitement over defeat of breast cancer Florida congressman suggests using El Chapo’s money to build wall For more stories like this that matter to you, click here to download the CBS 17 News app for free. Watch live newscasts, get breaking news and sign up for push alerts – download now
18 Jul 19
Social News XYZ

Washington, July 18 (IANS) The US House of Representatives has voted to hold Attorney General William Barr and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross in contempt of Congress over a census question. The resolution was passed 230-198 on Wednesday, largely along party lines. Four Democrats broke ranks to vote with all Republican lawmakers, Xinhua reported. The resolution […]

18 Jul 19

A New York federal judge has issued an order definitively blocking the Trump administration from adding a citizenship question to the 2020 census in any form, despite the administration’s insistence it has abandoned plans to add a question on the census.

18 Jul 19
ONLINE ARTICLES

[ad_1] © Bloomberg Key Speakers At The SelectUSA Summit (Bloomberg) — The House voted Wednesday to hold Attorney General William Barr and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross in contempt of Congress for withholding documents on now-canceled plans to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census. The 230-198 vote was largely symbolic because there’s virtually […]

18 Jul 19
Fort Smith/Fayetteville News | 5newsonline KFSM 5NEWS

[ooyala player_id=”e32b1952e526440e8cfb2c72937dad7e” auto=”true” width=”1920″ height=”1080″ pcode=”c3cHE6YMneRET89rDvIWFLO0U5lj” code=”9xYW02aTE64cNeHFunkRAtVcuAOcxYJ6″] SPRINGDALE, Ark. (KFSM) — Despite a supreme court ruling the citizenship question will not be on the 2020 Census,  some fear undocumented immigrants living in America will be too afraid to fill out the survey. An inaccurate count of how many people live in our country may have […]

18 Jul 19
The Irregular Bullshit

For-profit institutions There is a new blog post entitled, “The conundrum of higher education accreditation.” Eric Kelderman, “The Education Dept. Wants Accreditors to Compete. What Could Possibly Go Wrong?” Chronicle of Higher Education, July 11, 2019, https://www.chronicle.com/article/The-Education-Dept-Wants/246658 Census Jessica Schneider, “Federal judge permanently blocks Trump admin from adding citizenship question to 2020 census,” CNN, July 16, 2019, […]

18 Jul 19
Arcynewsy

The United States House of Representatives voted Wednesday to set aside an impeachment resolution against President Donald Trump, but held Justice Minister William Barr and trade minister Wilbur Ross in criminal contempt for challenging Congress quotations relating to the 2020 census. The measure against the two members of Trump's government, which passed to 230-198, was […]

18 Jul 19
East Bay Times
[vemba-video id=”van/ns-acc/2019/07/17/PO-109WE_CNNA-ST1-100000000548a097″] By Matthew Daly | Associated Press WASHINGTON — The Democratic-controlled House voted Wednesday to hold two top Trump administration officials in contempt of Congress for failing to comply with subpoenas related to a decision to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census. The House voted, 230-198, to hold Attorney General William Barr and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross in criminal contempt. The vote, a political blow to the Trump administration, is largely symbolic because the Justice Department is unlikely to prosecute the two men. [dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=morning-report” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] The action marks an escalation of Democratic efforts to use their House majority to aggressively investigate the inner workings of the Trump administration. Four Democrats opposed the contempt measure: Reps. Jeff Van Drew of New Jersey, Anthony Brindisi of New York, Conor Lamb of Pennsylvania and Jared Golden of Maine. All but Lamb are in their first term and all represent swing districts. Independent Rep. Justin Amash of Michigan, a former Republican, supported the contempt measure. President Donald Trump abandoned the citizenship question last week after the Supreme Court said the administration’s justification for the question “seems to have been contrived.” Trump directed agencies to try to compile the information using existing databases. The White House called the vote “ridiculous” and “yet another lawless attempt to harass the president and his administration.” The Justice and Commerce departments have produced more than 31,000 pages of documents to the House regarding the census issue, and senior officials from both agencies, including Ross, have spoken on the record about the matter, the White House said, adding that Democrats continue to demand documents that the White House contends are subject to executive privilege. “House Democrats know they have no legal right to these documents, but their shameful and cynical politics know no bounds,” White House press secretary Stephanie Grisham said in a statement.Democratic Rep. Elijah Cummings of Maryland, chairman of the House Oversight and Reform Committee, said the contempt vote was an important step to assert Congress’ constitutional authority to serve as a check on executive power. “Holding any secretary in criminal contempt of Congress is a serious and sober matter — one that I have done everything in my power to avoid,” Cummings said during House debate. “But in the case of the attorney general and Secretary Ross, they blatantly obstructed our ability to do congressional oversight into the real reason Secretary Ross was trying for the first time in 70 years to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census.” While Ross and other officials have claimed the sole reason they wanted to add the citizenship question was to enforce the Voting Rights Act, “we now know that claim was nothing but a pretext,” Cummings said. “The Supreme Court said that.” At the direction of Barr and Ross, “the departments of Justice and Commerce have been engaged in a campaign to subvert our laws and the process Congress put in place to maintain the integrity of the census,” Cummings said. The contempt resolution “is about protecting our democracy, protecting the integrity of this body. It’s bigger than the census,” he said. Ross called the vote a public relations “stunt” that further demonstrates Democrats’ “unending quest to generate headlines instead of operating in good faith with our department.” Democrats prefer to “play political games rather than help lead the country” and “have made every attempt to ascribe evil motivations to everyday functions of government,” Ross said. Ross told the oversight committee that the March 2018 decision to add the question was based on a Justice Department request to help enforce the Voting Rights Act. Democrats disputed that, citing documents unearthed last month suggesting that a push to draw legislative districts in overtly partisan and racist ways was the real reason the administration wanted to include the question. Democrats feared that adding the question would reduce participation in immigrant-heavy communities and result in a severe undercount of minority voters. They have pressed for specific documents to determine Ross’ motivation and contend the administration has declined to provide the material despite repeated requests. “The real issue we should be debating” is why Democrats are afraid to ask how many citizens live in the United States, said Rep. James Comer, R-Ky. Contrary to Democrats’ claims, Ross and other officials have cooperated with the oversight panel and provided thousands of documents, Comer said. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]“If the Democrats can’t impeach President Trump, they will instead hold his Cabinet in contempt of Congress,” he said. “This is just another episode in political theater.” In a letter late Wednesday to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Barr and Ross asked Democrats to postpone the vote, saying they have shown a “clear record of cooperation” with Congress. The contempt vote “is both unnecessarily undermining” relations between the two branches and “degrading” Congress’ “own institutional integrity,” they wrote. Trump has pledged to “fight all the subpoenas” issued by Congress and says he won’t work on legislative priorities, such as infrastructure, until Congress halts investigations of his administration.
18 Jul 19
The Mercury News
[vemba-video id=”van/ns-acc/2019/07/17/PO-109WE_CNNA-ST1-100000000548a097″] By Matthew Daly | Associated Press WASHINGTON — The Democratic-controlled House voted Wednesday to hold two top Trump administration officials in contempt of Congress for failing to comply with subpoenas related to a decision to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census. The House voted, 230-198, to hold Attorney General William Barr and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross in criminal contempt. The vote, a political blow to the Trump administration, is largely symbolic because the Justice Department is unlikely to prosecute the two men. [dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=morning-report” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] The action marks an escalation of Democratic efforts to use their House majority to aggressively investigate the inner workings of the Trump administration. Four Democrats opposed the contempt measure: Reps. Jeff Van Drew of New Jersey, Anthony Brindisi of New York, Conor Lamb of Pennsylvania and Jared Golden of Maine. All but Lamb are in their first term and all represent swing districts. Independent Rep. Justin Amash of Michigan, a former Republican, supported the contempt measure. President Donald Trump abandoned the citizenship question last week after the Supreme Court said the administration’s justification for the question “seems to have been contrived.” Trump directed agencies to try to compile the information using existing databases. The White House called the vote “ridiculous” and “yet another lawless attempt to harass the president and his administration.” The Justice and Commerce departments have produced more than 31,000 pages of documents to the House regarding the census issue, and senior officials from both agencies, including Ross, have spoken on the record about the matter, the White House said, adding that Democrats continue to demand documents that the White House contends are subject to executive privilege. “House Democrats know they have no legal right to these documents, but their shameful and cynical politics know no bounds,” White House press secretary Stephanie Grisham said in a statement. Democratic Rep. Elijah Cummings of Maryland, chairman of the House Oversight and Reform Committee, said the contempt vote was an important step to assert Congress’ constitutional authority to serve as a check on executive power. “Holding any secretary in criminal contempt of Congress is a serious and sober matter — one that I have done everything in my power to avoid,” Cummings said during House debate. “But in the case of the attorney general and Secretary Ross, they blatantly obstructed our ability to do congressional oversight into the real reason Secretary Ross was trying for the first time in 70 years to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census.” While Ross and other officials have claimed the sole reason they wanted to add the citizenship question was to enforce the Voting Rights Act, “we now know that claim was nothing but a pretext,” Cummings said. “The Supreme Court said that.” At the direction of Barr and Ross, “the departments of Justice and Commerce have been engaged in a campaign to subvert our laws and the process Congress put in place to maintain the integrity of the census,” Cummings said. The contempt resolution “is about protecting our democracy, protecting the integrity of this body. It’s bigger than the census,” he said. Ross called the vote a public relations “stunt” that further demonstrates Democrats’ “unending quest to generate headlines instead of operating in good faith with our department.” Democrats prefer to “play political games rather than help lead the country” and “have made every attempt to ascribe evil motivations to everyday functions of government,” Ross said. Ross told the oversight committee that the March 2018 decision to add the question was based on a Justice Department request to help enforce the Voting Rights Act. Democrats disputed that, citing documents unearthed last month suggesting that a push to draw legislative districts in overtly partisan and racist ways was the real reason the administration wanted to include the question. Democrats feared that adding the question would reduce participation in immigrant-heavy communities and result in a severe undercount of minority voters. They have pressed for specific documents to determine Ross’ motivation and contend the administration has declined to provide the material despite repeated requests. “The real issue we should be debating” is why Democrats are afraid to ask how many citizens live in the United States, said Rep. James Comer, R-Ky. Contrary to Democrats’ claims, Ross and other officials have cooperated with the oversight panel and provided thousands of documents, Comer said. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]”If the Democrats can’t impeach President Trump, they will instead hold his Cabinet in contempt of Congress,” he said. “This is just another episode in political theater.” In a letter late Wednesday to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Barr and Ross asked Democrats to postpone the vote, saying they have shown a “clear record of cooperation” with Congress. The contempt vote “is both unnecessarily undermining” relations between the two branches and “degrading” Congress’ “own institutional integrity,” they wrote. Trump has pledged to “fight all the subpoenas” issued by Congress and says he won’t work on legislative priorities, such as infrastructure, until Congress halts investigations of his administration.