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20 Jul 19
Orange County Register
HUNTINGTON BEACH – A 59-year-old man crossing Beach Boulevard in Huntington Beach, apparently outside a crosswalk, was hit by a car on Friday night and later died, police said. At 10:49 p.m., officers responded to a crash near Blaylock Drive and found the pedestrian on the sidewalk, said Sgt. Eric Warken of the Huntington Beach Police Department. He sustained major trauma and was transported to the UCI Medical Center, where he died, Warken said. The man, from Midway City, was crossing Beach Boulevard when he struck by a northbound 1999 black and purple Saturn driven by a 52-year-old Huntington Beach woman. “It appears the pedestrian was not in a crosswalk when he was struck by the driver,” Warken said in a statement. Any witnesses are asked to call Huntington Beach Police Officer J. Gasteiger at 714-960-8811 or Accident Investigator A. Turner at 714-536-5670. The area was the site of two pedestrian deaths on the same night earlier this year. The pedestrians were struck and killed on March 10 while walking outside crosswalks on Beach Boulevard, one near Slater Avenue, the other near Warner Avenue. At that time, Warken described the area where the collisions happened as well lit, with crosswalks reasonably spaced from each other. [dfm_iframe src=”https://www.google.com/maps/embed?pb=!1m18!1m12!1m3!1d12174.244605460808!2d-117.99712006830542!3d33.71608185649989!2m3!1f0!2f0!3f0!3m2!1i1024!2i768!4f13.1!3m3!1m2!1s0x80dd26f15ec0d721%3A0x1ca3da3c2a3063c1!2sBlaylock+Dr+%26+Beach+Blvd%2C+Huntington+Beach%2C+CA+92647!5e1!3m2!1sen!2sus!4v1563633458008!5m2!1sen!2sus” width=”100%” height=”500px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]
20 Jul 19
Mr Pro

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20 Jul 19
The Mercury News
While California Sen. Kamala Harris has harvested more than $7.5 million here this year in her bid for the presidency, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, outraised her in her own state in the year’s second quarter. Even so, she bested Mayor Pete Buttigieg in California dollars in the past month. A sharp dip in his statewide fundraising numbers in June could suggest that the multilingual Millennial mayor may have reached the end of his honeymoon in California, despite the fact that his fundraising numbers nationwide remained robust. Also worth noting: Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders actually “won” more California zip codes than any other candidate—albeit with smaller donations. That’s according to the latest batch of figures out from the Federal Election Committee. Every three months, the commission publishes a list of itemized donations—political contributions from any California donors who have given at least $200 a year. We still may be more than 16 months—yes, that’s 476 days—before election day in November 2020, but this year Californians have thrown more than $26 million at the two dozen candidates hoping to win the Democratic nomination and take on President Donald Trump. What else do the numbers tell us? In short: the race for money largely mirror the polls, showing that California’s donor class is gravitating toward the top five candidates. Harris, Buttigieg, Sanders, former Vice President Joe Biden and Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren have all jockeyed in both state and national surveys for the top spots. Together, all five have taken home more than 71% of California’s itemized donations in 2019. [dfm_iframe src=”https://infogram.com/top-fundraisers-in-california-1h7v4pqk58wz6k0″ width=”100%” height=”500px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] Money may not count for everything in politics (just ask Jeb Bush, who spent $130 million in his run for president in 2016). But about a year out from the deadline for the Democrats to choose their presidential ticket, a boatload of cash is necessary to keep contenders in the game. It’s even essential to make it into the next debate. This week, the Democratic National Committee will announce who will have made the cut for the next televised face-off, on July 30. One way to qualify: Garner donations from at least 65,000 people (with at least 200 from each state). And now that California comes early in the primary pecking order with its moved-up March 3 primary, early financial success here could be an important indicator of who will make it through that Super Tuesday. No surprise, the top fundraisers in California did particularly well in the biggest-giving (that is, the richest) zip codes in the state. Harris and Buttigieg both saw big infusions from the tonier neighborhoods of Los Angeles and the Bay Area, with Harris, the former district attorney of San Francisco, doing particularly well in her former city’s mansion-festooned Pacific and Presidio Heights. Buttigieg had a strong showing in West Hollywood, which is high-income and also has a large LGBTQ community that might have particular enthusiasm for the first major candidate who is gay. [dfm_iframe src=”https://infogram.com/top-california-zip-codes-1h706ej771r745y” width=”100%” height=”500px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] The ten zip codes shown above account for nearly 18% of all of California’s itemized donations this year so far. Sanders, who did well in many rural swaths of the state in the 2016 primary, was the top fundraiser in more of California’s zip codes than any other candidate. By that measure, he led in 443 zip codes, beating out Harris’ count of 419 and Buttigieg’s 167. The average Buttigieg donation was $418, and the average Harris donation was $371, while the average Sanders contribution was $66. In other words, Sanders may have been the most popular candidate in the largest number of neighborhoods across California—just not among big donors or in the neighborhoods where big donors tend to live. [dfm_iframe src=”https://infogram.com/dem-presidential-money-by-zipcode-july-2019-1hxj48j8zzmd2vg” width=”100%” height=”500px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]As the top collector of itemized California cash in the past quarter, Buttigieg raised roughly $3 million here in April and May, taking a massive bite out of what had been a commanding financial lead for Harris. But as of June, that monthly haul has been cut in half. That may be thanks in part to some less than flattering coverage of the mayor, who was criticized last month for his handling of a police shooting in his hometown, and to her standout performance in the first televised debate. Though Buttigieg’s California infusion from June still amounts to more than what Sanders and Warren received last month, both saw their contributions from California nearly double from May to June. And while Beto O’Rourke, the former Congressman from Texas who nearly defeated Sen. Ted Cruz in the 2018 Senate race, was clearly the flavor of the month in March, his popularity has been melting ever since. [dfm_iframe src=”https://infogram.com/monthly-dem-race-1h7v4pqk58qk6k0″ width=”100%” height=”500px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] See who’s donating to President Trump—and which California zip codes are generating more donations for him than for any single Democratic challenger—with this CalMatters analysis. Curious how the candidates are crafting their pitch for California voters? Read more here.
20 Jul 19
East Bay Times
While California Sen. Kamala Harris has harvested more than $7.5 million here this year in her bid for the presidency, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, outraised her in her own state in the year’s second quarter. Even so, she bested Mayor Pete Buttigieg in California dollars in the past month. A sharp dip in his statewide fundraising numbers in June could suggest that the multilingual Millennial mayor may have reached the end of his honeymoon in California, despite the fact that his fundraising numbers nationwide remained robust. Also worth noting: Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders actually “won” more California zip codes than any other candidate—albeit with smaller donations. That’s according to the latest batch of figures out from the Federal Election Committee. Every three months, the commission publishes a list of itemized donations—political contributions from any California donors who have given at least $200 a year. We still may be more than 16 months—yes, that’s 476 days—before election day in November 2020, but this year Californians have thrown more than $26 million at the two dozen candidates hoping to win the Democratic nomination and take on President Donald Trump. What else do the numbers tell us? In short: the race for money largely mirror the polls, showing that California’s donor class is gravitating toward the top five candidates. Harris, Buttigieg, Sanders, former Vice President Joe Biden and Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren have all jockeyed in both state and national surveys for the top spots. Together, all five have taken home more than 71% of California’s itemized donations in 2019. [dfm_iframe src=”https://infogram.com/top-fundraisers-in-california-1h7v4pqk58wz6k0″ width=”100%” height=”500px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] Money may not count for everything in politics (just ask Jeb Bush, who spent $130 million in his run for president in 2016). But about a year out from the deadline for the Democrats to choose their presidential ticket, a boatload of cash is necessary to keep contenders in the game. It’s even essential to make it into the next debate. This week, the Democratic National Committee will announce who will have made the cut for the next televised face-off, on July 30. One way to qualify: Garner donations from at least 65,000 people (with at least 200 from each state). And now that California comes early in the primary pecking order with its moved-up March 3 primary, early financial success here could be an important indicator of who will make it through that Super Tuesday. No surprise, the top fundraisers in California did particularly well in the biggest-giving (that is, the richest) zip codes in the state. Harris and Buttigieg both saw big infusions from the tonier neighborhoods of Los Angeles and the Bay Area, with Harris, the former district attorney of San Francisco, doing particularly well in her former city’s mansion-festooned Pacific and Presidio Heights. Buttigieg had a strong showing in West Hollywood, which is high-income and also has a large LGBTQ community that might have particular enthusiasm for the first major candidate who is gay. [dfm_iframe src=”https://infogram.com/top-california-zip-codes-1h706ej771r745y” width=”100%” height=”500px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] The ten zip codes shown above account for nearly 18% of all of California’s itemized donations this year so far. Sanders, who did well in many rural swaths of the state in the 2016 primary, was the top fundraiser in more of California’s zip codes than any other candidate. By that measure, he led in 443 zip codes, beating out Harris’ count of 419 and Buttigieg’s 167. The average Buttigieg donation was $418, and the average Harris donation was $371, while the average Sanders contribution was $66. In other words, Sanders may have been the most popular candidate in the largest number of neighborhoods across California—just not among big donors or in the neighborhoods where big donors tend to live. [dfm_iframe src=”https://infogram.com/dem-presidential-money-by-zipcode-july-2019-1hxj48j8zzmd2vg” width=”100%” height=”500px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]As the top collector of itemized California cash in the past quarter, Buttigieg raised roughly $3 million here in April and May, taking a massive bite out of what had been a commanding financial lead for Harris. But as of June, that monthly haul has been cut in half. That may be thanks in part to some less than flattering coverage of the mayor, who was criticized last month for his handling of a police shooting in his hometown, and to her standout performance in the first televised debate. Though Buttigieg’s California infusion from June still amounts to more than what Sanders and Warren received last month, both saw their contributions from California nearly double from May to June. And while Beto O’Rourke, the former Congressman from Texas who nearly defeated Sen. Ted Cruz in the 2018 Senate race, was clearly the flavor of the month in March, his popularity has been melting ever since. [dfm_iframe src=”https://infogram.com/monthly-dem-race-1h7v4pqk58qk6k0″ width=”100%” height=”500px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] See who’s donating to President Trump—and which California zip codes are generating more donations for him than for any single Democratic challenger—with this CalMatters analysis. Curious how the candidates are crafting their pitch for California voters? Read more here.
20 Jul 19
Bacchus

Source: Old Man of Storr by Cesar Ramos – Photo 312526577 / 500px

19 Jul 19
Ballet: The Best Photographs

Diana Vishneva Диана Вишнёва as “Marguerite Gautier” and Xander Parish as “Armand Duval”, “Marguerite and Armand”, choreography by Sir Frederick Ashton, music by Franz Liszt (Piano Sonata in B Minor by Vladimir Rumiantsev Владимир Румянцев), costumes by Cecil Beaton, based on the novel “The Lady of the Camellias” by Alexandre Dumas, Mariinsky Ballet Мариинский театр, […]

19 Jul 19
Wild Sugar | Cairns Fashion Label, Dress Shop and Boutique

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19 Jul 19
Orange County Register
[dfm_iframe src=”https://www.google.com/maps/d/u/1/embed?mid=1twbhrIDcygpPYb1SWmnE3ZgzDD9_BLEv” width=”100%” height=”500px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] Restaurants and other food vendors closed by health inspectors in Orange County from July 12 to July 19. Hong Phai Deli, 10562 Westminster Ave., Suite C, Garden Grove Closed: July 18 Reason: Cockroach infestation 7-Eleven, 12505 Beach Blvd., Suite A1, Stanton Permit downgraded to prepackaged foods only: July 17 Reason: Insufficient hot water Olmos Market, 1212 S. Bristol St., Suite 6, Santa Ana Permit downgraded to prepackaged foods only: July 17 (report) Reason: Insufficient hot water/plumbing in disrepair Full permit reinstated: July 19 Thai Time Cuisine, 330 N. Harbor Blvd., La Habra Closed: July 16 (report) Reason: Cockroach infestation The Patio Marketplace, 17877 Von Karman Ave., Suite 110, Irvine Closed: July 15 (report) Reason: Insufficient hot water Reopened: July 15 (report) Green China, 595 N. Tustin Ave., Orange Closed: July 15 (report) Reason: Cockroach infestation Reopened: July 17 Jimmy John’s, 912 E. Imperial Highway, Brea Closed: July 12 (report) Reason: Insufficient hot water Reopened: July 12 (report) UOC!, 12172 Brookhurst St., Garden Grove Closed: July 12 (report) Reason: Rodent infestation Reopened: July 16 (report) Updates since last week: El Sahuayo Mexican Food, 1717 S. Main St., Santa Ana, closed July 8 because of a cockroach infestation, reopened July 12 (report). [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] This list is published online every week with closures from the previous seven days. Restaurant status updates are published in the following week’s list. Links to inspection reports provided if available at time of publishing. Source: OC Health Care Agency database.
19 Jul 19
News Directory

BISMARCK, N.D. – A man who was injured during a protest against Dakota Access pipeline in January 2017 after filing law is taking enforcement of North Dakota law into force on "excessive violence." Marcus Mitchell, 24, filed Thursday against Morton County, a city of Bismarck and quoted Highway Patrol officers. The law says that officers […]

19 Jul 19
Daily Bulletin
[dfm_iframe src=”https://www.google.com/maps/d/embed?mid=1lclL-0uUIkDSHrnQOGTVu01afLt35Vzv” width=”100%” height=”500px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] Here are the restaurants and other food facilities closed by health inspectors in Riverside County between July 12 and 18, 2019, according to the county’s Department of Environmental Health. PhilHouse Hot Foods at Island Pacific Seafood Market, 44060 Margarita Road, Temecula Closure date: July 17 Grade: 81/B, failing Reason for closure: Failing an inspection while on probation. There were four critical violations. An employee didn’t wash hands (then when told to wash, used a sink that didn’t have hot water). Several containers of food were at unsafe temperatures, including meat at the front service counter, rice in a rice warmer and some food sitting out on a prep table. Another dish wasn’t being reheated properly. And an employee washed a knife in the same sink where food was being thawed. This was the restaurant’s fourth failed inspection since 2018; it was put on probation after the last one in February. Reopening date: July 18 after correcting violations and paying a new application and permit fee. It remains on probation. New grade: 98/A, passing Brandon’s Diner, 4719 Green River Road, Corona Closure date: July 17 Grade: 80/B, failing Reason for closure: No hot water. The owner said the water heater had broken that morning and a technician was trying to fix it; the facility continued to operate. There was one other critical violation, for some sausage, salad dressing and whipped butter containing milk being at unsafe temperatures. Reopening date: July 18 Domino’s Pizza, 4100 Central Ave. Suite 105, Riverside Closure date: July 12 Grade: 85/B, failing Reason for closure: No hot water. The facility was still operating despite not having hot water to properly wash hands and dishes. Additionally, there were no filters in the exhaust hood over the pizza oven, which was in use; the restaurant was told to immediately cease cooking and never use that equipment without filters in the hood above. Reopening date: Later that day Non-closure inspections of note Here are facilities that weren’t closed but had other significant issues in their inspections. The Chuck E. Cheese’s at 191 McKinley St. in Corona was inspected July 18 in response to a foodborne illness complaint and received a failing grade of 83/B with one critical violation, for food in two refrigeration units not being at a safe temperature. Both units were impounded until they can be repaired or replaced. Among the nine lesser violations, some food-contact surfaces weren’t clean: the soda machine’s nozzles and ice chute, the inside of the dough mixer and a cheese grater (a repeat violation; an employee said it doesn’t get cleaned until night, rather than every four hours as required to prevent bacterial growth). Mo’s Egg House, at 27405 Jefferson Ave. in Temecula, was inspected July 18 and received a failing grade of 83/B with two critical violations. Multiple items of food inside three refrigeration units, plus some eggs left out at the prep line, were at unsafe temperatures. The walk-in cooler was adjusted and reached a proper temperature but two smaller units were impounded. Also, some sausages weren’t being held at a hot enough temperature. Perris Burgers, at 12341 Perris Blvd. in Moreno Valley, was inspected July 17 and received a failing grade of 84/B. There were no critical violations, but among the lesser violations, some food was at unsafe temperatures and an employee didn’t wash hands between handling raw eggs and cooked bacon. The restaurant will undergo a review for failing its first inspection since being taken off probation; prior to this, records show, it hadn’t failed since an October 2016 inspection and closure. Philippine Island Grill, at 24021 Alessandro Blvd. Suite A104-A105 in Moreno Valley, was inspected July 15 and received a failing grade of 83/B with two critical violations. Some employees weren’t washing hands, and multiple items of food were at unsafe temperatures, including some desserts left out since the day before, some items in a warming unit since the day before and some food in a steam table that hadn’t been turned on. Additionally, the inspector noted that the restaurant’s health permit expired May 31. This was the restaurant’s third failed inspection since 2017; it now faces a permit suspension/revocation hearing. Updates from past weeks Lucky Wok, at 11046 Limonite Ave. in Jurupa Valley, which failed a July 9 inspection with a grade of 80/B and was closed for a cockroach infestation, was permitted to reopen July 16. The food market at the Dollar Tree Store at 30950 Date Palm Dr. in Cathedral City, which was closed July 9 because of a rodent infestation, was permitted to reopen July 16 after the market received pest-control service twice, sealed gaps that could let in vermin, discarded contaminated items and cleaned the affected areas. It received a passing grade of 97/A. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] About this list All food facilities in the county are routinely inspected to ensure they meet health codes. A facility loses four points for each critical violation — and may have to close if the violation can’t be corrected immediately — and one or two points for minor violations. An A grade (90 to 100 points) is passing. Grades of B (80 to 89 points) and C (79 or below) are failing and typically require the proprietor to make improvements and be re-inspected. This list is published online on Fridays. Any updates as restaurants are reopened will be included in next week’s list. For more information on inspections of these or any restaurants in Riverside County, visit restaurantgrading.rivcoeh.org. To submit a health complaint about a restaurant, go to www.rivcoeh.org/Complaint or call 888-722-4234 during business hours or 951-782-2968 after-hours. Sign up for The Localist, our daily email newsletter with handpicked stories relevant to where you live. Subscribe here.
19 Jul 19
Press Enterprise
[dfm_iframe src=”https://www.google.com/maps/d/embed?mid=1lclL-0uUIkDSHrnQOGTVu01afLt35Vzv” width=”100%” height=”500px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] Here are the restaurants and other food facilities closed by health inspectors in Riverside County between July 12 and 18, 2019, according to the county’s Department of Environmental Health. PhilHouse Hot Foods at Island Pacific Seafood Market, 44060 Margarita Road, Temecula Closure date: July 17 Grade: 81/B, failing Reason for closure: Failing an inspection while on probation. There were four critical violations. An employee didn’t wash hands (then when told to wash, used a sink that didn’t have hot water). Several containers of food were at unsafe temperatures, including meat at the front service counter, rice in a rice warmer and some food sitting out on a prep table. Another dish wasn’t being reheated properly. And an employee washed a knife in the same sink where food was being thawed. This was the restaurant’s fourth failed inspection since 2018; it was put on probation after the last one in February. Reopening date: July 18 after correcting violations and paying a new application and permit fee. It remains on probation. New grade: 98/A, passing Brandon’s Diner, 4719 Green River Road, Corona Closure date: July 17 Grade: 80/B, failing Reason for closure: No hot water. The owner said the water heater had broken that morning and a technician was trying to fix it; the facility continued to operate. There was one other critical violation, for some sausage, salad dressing and whipped butter containing milk being at unsafe temperatures. Reopening date: July 18 Domino’s Pizza, 4100 Central Ave. Suite 105, Riverside Closure date: July 12 Grade: 85/B, failing Reason for closure: No hot water. The facility was still operating despite not having hot water to properly wash hands and dishes. Additionally, there were no filters in the exhaust hood over the pizza oven, which was in use; the restaurant was told to immediately cease cooking and never use that equipment without filters in the hood above. Reopening date: Later that day Non-closure inspections of note Here are facilities that weren’t closed but had other significant issues in their inspections. The Chuck E. Cheese’s at 191 McKinley St. in Corona was inspected July 18 in response to a foodborne illness complaint and received a failing grade of 83/B with one critical violation, for food in two refrigeration units not being at a safe temperature. Both units were impounded until they can be repaired or replaced. Among the nine lesser violations, some food-contact surfaces weren’t clean: the soda machine’s nozzles and ice chute, the inside of the dough mixer and a cheese grater (a repeat violation; an employee said it doesn’t get cleaned until night, rather than every four hours as required to prevent bacterial growth). Mo’s Egg House, at 27405 Jefferson Ave. in Temecula, was inspected July 18 and received a failing grade of 83/B with two critical violations. Multiple items of food inside three refrigeration units, plus some eggs left out at the prep line, were at unsafe temperatures. The walk-in cooler was adjusted and reached a proper temperature but two smaller units were impounded. Also, some sausages weren’t being held at a hot enough temperature. Perris Burgers, at 12341 Perris Blvd. in Moreno Valley, was inspected July 17 and received a failing grade of 84/B. There were no critical violations, but among the lesser violations, some food was at unsafe temperatures and an employee didn’t wash hands between handling raw eggs and cooked bacon. The restaurant will undergo a review for failing its first inspection since being taken off probation; prior to this, records show, it hadn’t failed since an October 2016 inspection and closure. Philippine Island Grill, at 24021 Alessandro Blvd. Suite A104-A105 in Moreno Valley, was inspected July 15 and received a failing grade of 83/B with two critical violations. Some employees weren’t washing hands, and multiple items of food were at unsafe temperatures, including some desserts left out since the day before, some items in a warming unit since the day before and some food in a steam table that hadn’t been turned on. Additionally, the inspector noted that the restaurant’s health permit expired May 31. This was the restaurant’s third failed inspection since 2017; it now faces a permit suspension/revocation hearing. Updates from past weeks Lucky Wok, at 11046 Limonite Ave. in Jurupa Valley, which failed a July 9 inspection with a grade of 80/B and was closed for a cockroach infestation, was permitted to reopen July 16. The food market at the Dollar Tree Store at 30950 Date Palm Dr. in Cathedral City, which was closed July 9 because of a rodent infestation, was permitted to reopen July 16 after the market received pest-control service twice, sealed gaps that could let in vermin, discarded contaminated items and cleaned the affected areas. It received a passing grade of 97/A. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] About this list All food facilities in the county are routinely inspected to ensure they meet health codes. A facility loses four points for each critical violation — and may have to close if the violation can’t be corrected immediately — and one or two points for minor violations. An A grade (90 to 100 points) is passing. Grades of B (80 to 89 points) and C (79 or below) are failing and typically require the proprietor to make improvements and be re-inspected. This list is published online on Fridays. Any updates as restaurants are reopened will be included in next week’s list. For more information on inspections of these or any restaurants in Riverside County, visit restaurantgrading.rivcoeh.org. To submit a health complaint about a restaurant, go to www.rivcoeh.org/Complaint or call 888-722-4234 during business hours or 951-782-2968 after-hours. Sign up for The Localist, our daily email newsletter with handpicked stories relevant to where you live. Subscribe here.
19 Jul 19
Redlands Daily Facts
[dfm_iframe src=”https://www.google.com/maps/d/embed?mid=1lclL-0uUIkDSHrnQOGTVu01afLt35Vzv” width=”100%” height=”500px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] Here are the restaurants and other food facilities closed by health inspectors in Riverside County between July 12 and 18, 2019, according to the county’s Department of Environmental Health. PhilHouse Hot Foods at Island Pacific Seafood Market, 44060 Margarita Road, Temecula Closure date: July 17 Grade: 81/B, failing Reason for closure: Failing an inspection while on probation. There were four critical violations. An employee didn’t wash hands (then when told to wash, used a sink that didn’t have hot water). Several containers of food were at unsafe temperatures, including meat at the front service counter, rice in a rice warmer and some food sitting out on a prep table. Another dish wasn’t being reheated properly. And an employee washed a knife in the same sink where food was being thawed. This was the restaurant’s fourth failed inspection since 2018; it was put on probation after the last one in February. Reopening date: July 18 after correcting violations and paying a new application and permit fee. It remains on probation. New grade: 98/A, passing Brandon’s Diner, 4719 Green River Road, Corona Closure date: July 17 Grade: 80/B, failing Reason for closure: No hot water. The owner said the water heater had broken that morning and a technician was trying to fix it; the facility continued to operate. There was one other critical violation, for some sausage, salad dressing and whipped butter containing milk being at unsafe temperatures. Reopening date: July 18 Domino’s Pizza, 4100 Central Ave. Suite 105, Riverside Closure date: July 12 Grade: 85/B, failing Reason for closure: No hot water. The facility was still operating despite not having hot water to properly wash hands and dishes. Additionally, there were no filters in the exhaust hood over the pizza oven, which was in use; the restaurant was told to immediately cease cooking and never use that equipment without filters in the hood above. Reopening date: Later that day Non-closure inspections of note Here are facilities that weren’t closed but had other significant issues in their inspections. The Chuck E. Cheese’s at 191 McKinley St. in Corona was inspected July 18 in response to a foodborne illness complaint and received a failing grade of 83/B with one critical violation, for food in two refrigeration units not being at a safe temperature. Both units were impounded until they can be repaired or replaced. Among the nine lesser violations, some food-contact surfaces weren’t clean: the soda machine’s nozzles and ice chute, the inside of the dough mixer and a cheese grater (a repeat violation; an employee said it doesn’t get cleaned until night, rather than every four hours as required to prevent bacterial growth). Mo’s Egg House, at 27405 Jefferson Ave. in Temecula, was inspected July 18 and received a failing grade of 83/B with two critical violations. Multiple items of food inside three refrigeration units, plus some eggs left out at the prep line, were at unsafe temperatures. The walk-in cooler was adjusted and reached a proper temperature but two smaller units were impounded. Also, some sausages weren’t being held at a hot enough temperature. Perris Burgers, at 12341 Perris Blvd. in Moreno Valley, was inspected July 17 and received a failing grade of 84/B. There were no critical violations, but among the lesser violations, some food was at unsafe temperatures and an employee didn’t wash hands between handling raw eggs and cooked bacon. The restaurant will undergo a review for failing its first inspection since being taken off probation; prior to this, records show, it hadn’t failed since an October 2016 inspection and closure. Philippine Island Grill, at 24021 Alessandro Blvd. Suite A104-A105 in Moreno Valley, was inspected July 15 and received a failing grade of 83/B with two critical violations. Some employees weren’t washing hands, and multiple items of food were at unsafe temperatures, including some desserts left out since the day before, some items in a warming unit since the day before and some food in a steam table that hadn’t been turned on. Additionally, the inspector noted that the restaurant’s health permit expired May 31. This was the restaurant’s third failed inspection since 2017; it now faces a permit suspension/revocation hearing. Updates from past weeks Lucky Wok, at 11046 Limonite Ave. in Jurupa Valley, which failed a July 9 inspection with a grade of 80/B and was closed for a cockroach infestation, was permitted to reopen July 16. The food market at the Dollar Tree Store at 30950 Date Palm Dr. in Cathedral City, which was closed July 9 because of a rodent infestation, was permitted to reopen July 16 after the market received pest-control service twice, sealed gaps that could let in vermin, discarded contaminated items and cleaned the affected areas. It received a passing grade of 97/A. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] About this list All food facilities in the county are routinely inspected to ensure they meet health codes. A facility loses four points for each critical violation — and may have to close if the violation can’t be corrected immediately — and one or two points for minor violations. An A grade (90 to 100 points) is passing. Grades of B (80 to 89 points) and C (79 or below) are failing and typically require the proprietor to make improvements and be re-inspected. This list is published online on Fridays. Any updates as restaurants are reopened will be included in next week’s list. For more information on inspections of these or any restaurants in Riverside County, visit restaurantgrading.rivcoeh.org. To submit a health complaint about a restaurant, go to www.rivcoeh.org/Complaint or call 888-722-4234 during business hours or 951-782-2968 after-hours. Sign up for The Localist, our daily email newsletter with handpicked stories relevant to where you live. Subscribe here.