Butte County

22 Apr 19
Archy Worldys

RENO, Nevada (AP) – During her career as a flight attendant, Laura Haneveld had a checklist to remind her what to do in the event of a fire. "The most important thing in a plane is fire, whether you're on the ground or in the air," Haneveld said. "I'm very focused on how fast fire […]

22 Apr 19
Oroville Mercury-Register
The Butte County Association of Governments is required to prepare a Federal Transportation Improvement Program (FTIP) every two years and a long-range Region Transportation Plan (RTP) every four years. The FTIP identifies all transportation-related projects that have federal transportation funding or require some federal approval. Prior to the update of the documents, BCAG will host a public workshop Tuesday to solicit input. BCAG is also updating its “Public Participation Plan” with any legislative references or other minor changes as necessary. The Public Workshop will be held from 2-5 p.m. at Chapman Elementary School, 1071 16th Str. in Chico. For those who cannot attend the meeting and want to look online or find who to contact, information will be posted online at http://www.BCAG.org, or contact Ivan Garcia at BCAG 809-4603 or email igarvia@bcag.org.
22 Apr 19
Chico Enterprise-Record
The Butte County Association of Governments is required to prepare a Federal Transportation Improvement Program (FTIP) every two years and a long-range Region Transportation Plan (RTP) every four years. The FTIP identifies all transportation-related projects that have federal transportation funding or require some federal approval. Prior to the update of the documents, BCAG will host a public workshop Tuesday to solicit input. BCAG is also updating its “Public Participation Plan” with any legislative references or other minor changes as necessary. The Public Workshop will be held from 2-5 p.m. at Chapman Elementary School, 1071 16th Str. in Chico. For those who cannot attend the meeting and want to look online or find who to contact, information will be posted online at http://www.BCAG.org, or contact Ivan Garcia at BCAG 809-4603 or email igarvia@bcag.org.
22 Apr 19
Oroville News Live

One lane will be closed on Oro Dam Blvd. East today from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. between Canyon Drive and Hyatt Powerplant Access Road. DWR and Butte County Sherriff work crews are chipping brush and wood removed as part of DWR’s Fuel Load Reduction Project (FLRP). The FLRP is a coordinated effort that seeks […]

22 Apr 19
Alaturka Online

By Umar Farooq WASHINGTON (AA) – The number of measles cases in the U.S. is approaching its highest since the disease was declared eliminated in 2000, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) said Monday. So far in 2019, 626 cases have been reported, 41 less than the current record of 667 cases in 2014. "In […]

22 Apr 19
Alaturka

By Umar Farooq</p> <p>WASHINGTON (AA) – The number of measles cases in the U.S. is approaching its highest since the disease was declared eliminated in 2000, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) said Monday.</p> <p>So far in 2019, 626 cases have been reported, 41 less than the current record of 667 cases in 2014.</p> <p>&quot;In […]

22 Apr 19
Popula

April 21, 2019Oakland, California I can tell the weather is warming up because my usual night-time gear—sweatshirt and sweatpants—was starting to make me too hot, a fact which will be double-confirmed later in this chronicle when my broccoli rabe turns out to have “bolted,” or begun to turn its energy towards making seeds instead of […]

22 Apr 19
Oroville Mercury-Register
There is no doubt that we live in a world wrought with danger, and people have to be alert to traffic, terrorists and thugs in addition to extreme weather and poisonous possibilities. Perils also exist for wild animal life through venomous reptiles, toxic plants, and even minerals in some rocks can be lethal. Just about every species has some degree of toxicity or physical aspect dangerous to various organisms, although there are adaptations in nature that provide degrees of immunity to toxins. Take the case of rattlesnakes and kingsnakes, both common in the Oroville area. Somehow, the kingsnake has developed an immunity to the rattler’s venom, and even seeks out the rattlesnake to constrict and swallow as food. Once I was guiding a group of Japanese scholars around the Feather River Nature Center’s mossy boulders, and the girls started screaming! Sliding through the rocks at full speed was a handsome rattlesnake, and it plunged into an escape hole right before our eyes. The girls hadn’t seen a rattlesnake before, and then we came upon a large black-and-white kingsnake, sniffing, on the trail of lunch. What a show if we could have seen the finale! The most formidable rattler trying to flee with its head low to the ground, and the non-poisonous kingsnake hot on the chase, seeking a head-hold. Some plants are deadly if eaten; in fact, the list is quite long, and many common foods carry toxins that can kill if eaten at the wrong time or in the wrong amount or wrong way. It’s been said “Poison can cure or kill — it’s in the dose.” On the other side are animal venoms that can be injected into the blood stream to inflict an immediate crisis. That refers mostly to snakes in the reptile family since there are only two species of lizards that are venomous — the Gila Monster and the Mexican Beaded Lizard. The main difference between venomous and poisonous is that venom is injected straight into the bloodstream, such as through the fangs of a snake, while poisons, such as in certain plants, and some mushrooms, take longer to act by digestion. Rated among the most deadly are some non-reptiles, including the Box Jellyfish (thought to be the most venomous animal on Earth), the Cone Snail, and the Stone Fish, all of ocean waters. On some ten-most- poisonous animal lists are: 1. Box Jellyfish, 2. King Cobra, 3. Marbled Cone Snail, 4. Blue-ringed Octopus, 5. Death Stalker Scorpion, 6. Stonefish, 7. Brazil Wandering Spider, 8. Inland Taipan, 9. Puffer Fish, 10. Poison Dart Frog. Most lists consider the Australian Inland Taipan the most venomous snake … of about 3,000 snake species on Earth. About 600 species are venomous, with only 300 that are deadly. Most plants contain varying amounts of toxins, even common edibles such as potatoes and tomatoes, and the trick is to moderate consumption and to know what’s good for you, and what’s bad. “Dosage.” Just as varying numbers of animals form immunities, so mankind may evolve more toleration to toxins. That idea is hoped for in the case of coffee. More strict warning signs are being required for coffee and pastries containing Acrylamide, a carcinogenic chemical produced when the beans are roasted and the croissants are baked, are proposed in accordance with the passage of Proposition 65 in 1986. Of 391,000 vascular plant species known and described on Earth, (about 2,000 more species are being discovered each year), only about 31,000 species have been studied for uses. Some plants are deadly, and many are right here in Butte County. The U.S has more than 500 major poisonous plants. Castor Bean and Oleander, and many right in your garden are among the dangerous. Passion Flower, Jack-in-the-Pulpit, Poison Hemlock, Lilies, Trumpet Vine, for instance. Poisonous plants have been introduced around the world as ornamental flowers along with food plants. Let your research begin![related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] “Know there is richest honey in poison flowers.” — John Keats “One man’s poison oak is another animals spinach” — Henry Ward Beecher
22 Apr 19
Chico Enterprise-Record
There is no doubt that we live in a world wrought with danger, and people have to be alert to traffic, terrorists and thugs in addition to extreme weather and poisonous possibilities. Perils also exist for wild animal life through venomous reptiles, toxic plants, and even minerals in some rocks can be lethal. Just about every species has some degree of toxicity or physical aspect dangerous to various organisms, although there are adaptations in nature that provide degrees of immunity to toxins. Take the case of rattlesnakes and kingsnakes, both common in the Oroville area. Somehow, the kingsnake has developed an immunity to the rattler’s venom, and even seeks out the rattlesnake to constrict and swallow as food. Once I was guiding a group of Japanese scholars around the Feather River Nature Center’s mossy boulders, and the girls started screaming! Sliding through the rocks at full speed was a handsome rattlesnake, and it plunged into an escape hole right before our eyes. The girls hadn’t seen a rattlesnake before, and then we came upon a large black-and-white kingsnake, sniffing, on the trail of lunch. What a show if we could have seen the finale! The most formidable rattler trying to flee with its head low to the ground, and the non-poisonous kingsnake hot on the chase, seeking a head-hold. Some plants are deadly if eaten; in fact, the list is quite long, and many common foods carry toxins that can kill if eaten at the wrong time or in the wrong amount or wrong way. It’s been said “Poison can cure or kill — it’s in the dose.” On the other side are animal venoms that can be injected into the blood stream to inflict an immediate crisis. That refers mostly to snakes in the reptile family since there are only two species of lizards that are venomous — the Gila Monster and the Mexican Beaded Lizard. The main difference between venomous and poisonous is that venom is injected straight into the bloodstream, such as through the fangs of a snake, while poisons, such as in certain plants, and some mushrooms, take longer to act by digestion. Rated among the most deadly are some non-reptiles, including the Box Jellyfish (thought to be the most venomous animal on Earth), the Cone Snail, and the Stone Fish, all of ocean waters. On some ten-most- poisonous animal lists are: 1. Box Jellyfish, 2. King Cobra, 3. Marbled Cone Snail, 4. Blue-ringed Octopus, 5. Death Stalker Scorpion, 6. Stonefish, 7. Brazil Wandering Spider, 8. Inland Taipan, 9. Puffer Fish, 10. Poison Dart Frog. Most lists consider the Australian Inland Taipan the most venomous snake … of about 3,000 snake species on Earth. About 600 species are venomous, with only 300 that are deadly. Most plants contain varying amounts of toxins, even common edibles such as potatoes and tomatoes, and the trick is to moderate consumption and to know what’s good for you, and what’s bad. “Dosage.” Just as varying numbers of animals form immunities, so mankind may evolve more toleration to toxins. That idea is hoped for in the case of coffee. More strict warning signs are being required for coffee and pastries containing Acrylamide, a carcinogenic chemical produced when the beans are roasted and the croissants are baked, are proposed in accordance with the passage of Proposition 65 in 1986. Of 391,000 vascular plant species known and described on Earth, (about 2,000 more species are being discovered each year), only about 31,000 species have been studied for uses. Some plants are deadly, and many are right here in Butte County. The U.S has more than 500 major poisonous plants. Castor Bean and Oleander, and many right in your garden are among the dangerous. Passion Flower, Jack-in-the-Pulpit, Poison Hemlock, Lilies, Trumpet Vine, for instance. Poisonous plants have been introduced around the world as ornamental flowers along with food plants. Let your research begin![related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] “Know there is richest honey in poison flowers.” — John Keats “One man’s poison oak is another animals spinach” — Henry Ward Beecher
22 Apr 19
Chico Enterprise-Record
Monday Community Whole Body Fit: 8:50-10 a.m. Complete workout program for all ability levels. First class free.  Equipment provided. 10 punch pass card, $40. Feather River Activity Center, 1875 Feather River Blvd., Oroville. 533-2011. Instructor, Lynndee Caput, 533-0780. Weekly. YMCA Health & Fitness: 7:45-8:45 a.m. Thai Chi. 4:30-5:30 p.m. Women’s Only Body Sculpt. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Co-ed Core Training. 1684 Robinson St. 533-9622. 533-9622. 1684 Robinson St. Weekly. YMCA Pool: 8-9 a.m. Water Fitness. 9-10 a.m. Deep Water Cardio. 10-11 a.m. Water Fitness. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Deep Water Cardio and Lap Swim. 533-9622. 1684 Robinson St. Weekly. Gray Lodge Wildlife Area: Sunrise to sunset. 9,100 acres; fields, riparian areas, ponds, waterways; shelter for 300+ species of resident and migrant birds, mammals. Self-guided nature trail, hunting, exhibits. 3207 Rutherford Road, Gridley. 846-7500. Public Health Clinic: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Confidential reproductive health services for men/women. 78 Table Mountain Blvd. 538-7341. Weekly. Free lunch: 9:30-10:30 a.m. Salvation Army 1640 Washington Ave., Oroville. Christian Fellowship. Feed the People Ministries, Jackie, 693-8388. Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth Monday. Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program: Medicare counseling services. RSVP appointments, 898-6716. Fourth Monday. Bolt’s Antique Tool Museum: 10 a.m.-3:45 p.m. 13,000+ tools, auto parts, old kitchen utensils and more.  Admission $3, free to under age 12; $2.50 AAA members, groups 15+. Tuesdays: Half price to seniors. Call for group tour appointments. No entrance fee to ladies on Thursdays. 538-2528, 538-2406. 1650 Broderick St. Monday-Saturday. Chinese Temple and Museum Complex: Noon-4 p.m. Built in 1863 to serve the largest Chinese community north of Sacramento. $3 general, free to ages 12 and younger, $2.50 for AAA members or groups of 15+. Special tours and days by arrangement through Oroville City Hall. Temple, 1500 Broderick St. Call to schedule a group tour. 538-2406. Weekly. Health, emotional support New Beginnings AA: 6:30-7:30 a.m. Alano Club, 2471 Bird St. Open meet. 534-9960. Weekdays. Butte County Public Health Department: Oroville clinic, 78 Table Mountain Blvd. Appointments, 538-7341. Weekly. Alcoholics Anonymous, Lake Oroville Fellowship: Noon, 8 p.m. 2471 Bird St. 538-8180. Weekly. Narcotics Anonymous: Noon, First Step NA at 3300 Spencer Ave. (African American cultural Center); Noon, Open Door at 2555 Baldwin (Open Door Church): 5 p.m. Foothil NA at Calvary Lutheran Church,10 Concordia Lane. 534-3599. Victims of domestic Violence Support Group: Noon. 1931 Arline Rhine Dr., Oroville. 532-6427. Catalyst Domestic Violence Services, 24-hour crisis line 1-800-895-8476. Weekly. Restraining order clinics: Daily. Call for appointments. Catalyst Domestic Violence Services, 532-6427. Sisters in Sobriety: 5:30 p.m. Open AA women’s meet. 2471 Bird St. ADAM 12-Step Christ-Centered Support Group: 6:30 p.m. Corker House, 2649 Elgin St. 532-9261. Weekly. Al-Anon: 6:30-7:30 p.m. Unity AFG. Feather River Senior Center, 1335 Myers St. 334-6734. Weekly. Forbestown Fellowship AA: 6:30 p.m. Open meet at Elevation Church, 19082 New York Flat Road, Forbestown. Mike, 701-9150. Weekly. Gamblers Anonymous: 7 p.m. Open meeting. Holt House, 1575 Bird St., Oroville. 591-5584. Weekly. To submit an item for Oroville calendar, email to calendar@orovillemr.com, fax to 342-3617 or mail to Oroville Community Calendar, P.O. Box 9, Chico, CA 95927. Include your name and phone number.
22 Apr 19
Oroville Mercury-Register
Monday Community Chico Seed Orchard: 7 a.m.-7 p.m. Pedestrian gate open daily. Drive-thru gate open 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. One-mile self-guiding nature trail meanders through unique botanical area in Edgar Slough. Pet owners keep dogs on leash at all times. Search for Chico Seed Orchard online for more information. 2741 Cramer Lane, Chico. Healing Art Gallery: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Photography art by Antonio Ramirez displayed in Enloe Cancer Center as part of feature of Northern California artists whose lives are touched by cancer. Begins Friday, open through July 19. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. 265 Cohasset Road. For more information, email rebecca.senoglu@enloe.org or call 332-3856. Gray Lodge Wildlife Area: Sunrise-sunset; 9,100 acres of fields, riparian areas, ponds, waterways; shelter for 300+ species of resident, migrant birds and mammals. Self-guided nature trail, exhibits, hunting, fishing. 3207 Rutherford Road, Gridley. 846-7500. SCORE: 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Free face-to-face counseling for startup or existing businesses. Service Corps of Retired Executives, 1324 Mangrove Ave., Suite 114. Chico Chamber, 891-5556, to schedule appointments. http://www.greaterchicoarea.score.org. Monday-Saturday. Weekly. Chico Heritage Association: Noon-3 p.m. Volunteers help on history of area, businesses, homes, individuals; research library. Donations appreciated. Garden Walk, 225 Main St. 345-7522. http://www.chicoheritage.net. Temporary restraining order help: 2-4 p.m. RSVP. 330 Wall St., Suite 50. 343-7711. For victims of domestic violence. Free. Catalyst Domestic Violence Services. 1-800-895-8476. Weekdays. Clubs Orland Rotary Club: Noon. Roundtable Pizza, 302 E. Walker St. Jim Miller, 865-3349. Weekly. Duplicate Bridge: 12:30 p.m. One session open to all. Bidwell Bridge Studio, Native Daughters of the Golden West Hall, 965 Salem St. 899-4096. Weekly. Health, emotional support Alcoholics Anonymous: Meet times, locations, talk to recovering alcoholic, 342-5756. http://www.aabutte-glenn.org. Weekly. HIV and HEP C/STD testing: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. By appointment; fees by eligibility. Butte County Public Health Department: Chico, 695 Oleander Ave. 879-3665; Oroville, 78 Table Mountain Blvd. 538-7341. Weekly. Iversen Wellness & Recovery Center and Med Clinic: 9:15 a.m. 12-Step; 10:15 a.m.Why Not Try; 11 a.m. Advisory Team; Noon, Member’s meeting; 1 p.m. Orientation and Women’s Group; Combating Depression, 2 p.m. Computer lab, 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. 492 Rio Lindo Ave. Wellness, 879-3311; Med Clinic, 879-3974. https://nvcss.org/programs/iversen/ Weekly. Narcotics Anonymous: Noon, Chico NA at 255 E. 20th St., Unit C.: 6 p.m. Free to Be Me NA Group, Unitarian Church, 1289 Filbert Ave. (LGBT NA meet): 7 p.m. Question and Answer meeting, Chico NA at 255 E. 20th St., Unit C.1-877-669-1669. Weekly. Victims of Domestic Violence Support Group: RSVP. Noon. 1931 Arline Rhine Drive, Oroville. 532-6427. Catalyst Domestic Violence Services. 24-hour crisis line 1-800-895-8476. Weekly. Recovery International: 4 p.m. Support group focuses on symptoms, not diagnoses, of mental health and nervous disorders; stress, tension, anxiety, panic, mood disorders, fatigue, anger. Faith Lutheran Church, 667 E. First Ave., Room 6, Chico. http://www.recoveryinternational.org. 342-6087. Weekly. Healthy Steps: 6-7 p.m. Improve memory skills, balance and strength, eye-hand coordination. All ages, fitness levels. $10 first class. Enloe Fountain Medical Conference Room, Fountain Medical Plaza, 251 Cohasset Road. Register, 332-3856. Weekly. Al-Anon: 7-8:30 p.m. Monday Night Study AFG. East Avenue Church, 1184 East Avenue, Chico. 342-5756. Weekly. Gamblers Anonymous: 7 p.m. 1575 Bird St. Holt House, Oroville. 591-5584. Weekly. Submit calendar listings, corrections or updates by email calendar@chicoer.com, fax 342-3617 or mail Enterprise-Record, P.O. Box 9, Chico, CA, 95927.
22 Apr 19
Chico Enterprise-Record
Monday Community Chico Seed Orchard: 7 a.m.-7 p.m. Pedestrian gate open daily. Drive-thru gate open 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. One-mile self-guiding nature trail meanders through unique botanical area in Edgar Slough. Pet owners keep dogs on leash at all times. Search for Chico Seed Orchard online for more information. 2741 Cramer Lane, Chico. Healing Art Gallery: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Photography art by Antonio Ramirez displayed in Enloe Cancer Center as part of feature of Northern California artists whose lives are touched by cancer. Begins Friday, open through July 19. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. 265 Cohasset Road. For more information, email rebecca.senoglu@enloe.org or call 332-3856. Gray Lodge Wildlife Area: Sunrise-sunset; 9,100 acres of fields, riparian areas, ponds, waterways; shelter for 300+ species of resident, migrant birds and mammals. Self-guided nature trail, exhibits, hunting, fishing. 3207 Rutherford Road, Gridley. 846-7500. SCORE: 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Free face-to-face counseling for startup or existing businesses. Service Corps of Retired Executives, 1324 Mangrove Ave., Suite 114. Chico Chamber, 891-5556, to schedule appointments. http://www.greaterchicoarea.score.org. Monday-Saturday. Weekly. Chico Heritage Association: Noon-3 p.m. Volunteers help on history of area, businesses, homes, individuals; research library. Donations appreciated. Garden Walk, 225 Main St. 345-7522. http://www.chicoheritage.net. Temporary restraining order help: 2-4 p.m. RSVP. 330 Wall St., Suite 50. 343-7711. For victims of domestic violence. Free. Catalyst Domestic Violence Services. 1-800-895-8476. Weekdays. Clubs Orland Rotary Club: Noon. Roundtable Pizza, 302 E. Walker St. Jim Miller, 865-3349. Weekly. Duplicate Bridge: 12:30 p.m. One session open to all. Bidwell Bridge Studio, Native Daughters of the Golden West Hall, 965 Salem St. 899-4096. Weekly. Health, emotional support Alcoholics Anonymous: Meet times, locations, talk to recovering alcoholic, 342-5756. http://www.aabutte-glenn.org. Weekly. HIV and HEP C/STD testing: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. By appointment; fees by eligibility. Butte County Public Health Department: Chico, 695 Oleander Ave. 879-3665; Oroville, 78 Table Mountain Blvd. 538-7341. Weekly. Iversen Wellness & Recovery Center and Med Clinic: 9:15 a.m. 12-Step; 10:15 a.m.Why Not Try; 11 a.m. Advisory Team; Noon, Member’s meeting; 1 p.m. Orientation and Women’s Group; Combating Depression, 2 p.m. Computer lab, 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. 492 Rio Lindo Ave. Wellness, 879-3311; Med Clinic, 879-3974. https://nvcss.org/programs/iversen/ Weekly. Narcotics Anonymous: Noon, Chico NA at 255 E. 20th St., Unit C.: 6 p.m. Free to Be Me NA Group, Unitarian Church, 1289 Filbert Ave. (LGBT NA meet): 7 p.m. Question and Answer meeting, Chico NA at 255 E. 20th St., Unit C.1-877-669-1669. Weekly. Victims of Domestic Violence Support Group: RSVP. Noon. 1931 Arline Rhine Drive, Oroville. 532-6427. Catalyst Domestic Violence Services. 24-hour crisis line 1-800-895-8476. Weekly. Recovery International: 4 p.m. Support group focuses on symptoms, not diagnoses, of mental health and nervous disorders; stress, tension, anxiety, panic, mood disorders, fatigue, anger. Faith Lutheran Church, 667 E. First Ave., Room 6, Chico. http://www.recoveryinternational.org. 342-6087. Weekly. Healthy Steps: 6-7 p.m. Improve memory skills, balance and strength, eye-hand coordination. All ages, fitness levels. $10 first class. Enloe Fountain Medical Conference Room, Fountain Medical Plaza, 251 Cohasset Road. Register, 332-3856. Weekly. Al-Anon: 7-8:30 p.m. Monday Night Study AFG. East Avenue Church, 1184 East Avenue, Chico. 342-5756. Weekly. Gamblers Anonymous: 7 p.m. 1575 Bird St. Holt House, Oroville. 591-5584. Weekly. Submit calendar listings, corrections or updates by email calendar@chicoer.com, fax 342-3617 or mail Enterprise-Record, P.O. Box 9, Chico, CA, 95927.
22 Apr 19
Chico Enterprise-Record
25 YEARS AGO Bike racers take over downtown Hundreds of collegiate bike racers streamed through downtown Sunday, creating a breeze as they whizzed past spectators. Just a week after the nationally-renown Wildflower bike rides, the Wildcat Cycling Challenge lured hundreds of local and out-of-town collegiate bikers. Limited to students, the Challenge featured three events. The downtown Criterium included men’s and women’s races on a .8 mile course with riders cruising at about 30 mph going through four 90-degree turns, making as many as 40 laps on pavement. The start and finish line was in front of Taco Bell, Fifth and Broadway. The triple-event Challenge began Saturday with the Bangor Road Race – six men’s and women’s runs through  Oroville foothills of 30 or 61 miles. The Road Z Time Trial was held Saturday on a flat 11-mile course in Glenn County. The Wildcat Challenge was hosted by Chico State University’s cycling team. — Chico Enterprise-Record, April 25, 1994 50 YEARS AGO 230 Acres of Kiwi Fruit going in North of Here More and more Kiwi fruit is being planted in the Mid-Valley. Five thousand plants, to be planted on land located off Keefer Road north of Chico, have arrived in San Francisco from New Zealand. They will be inspected by the county department upon reaching this area. John Harroun, inspector for the county agricultural commissioner in the Chico area, was informed that 28,000 “Chinese gooseberry” Kiwi plants will be planted by Melvin Crites of Gridley on 230 acres at the Keefer Road property owned by Mrs. Helen Klein. The planting will be the largest in the Sacramento Valley. It takes three years for Kiwi plants to start commercial production. Ted Turner of Chico is another local resident who plans to put in Kiwi fruit. Turner will grow his own plants. — Chico Enterprise-Record, April 22, 1969 75 YEARS AGO 5000 Air Cadets Trained at CAAF In Two Years CHICO ARMY AIR FIELD – Over 5,000 flying students have passed through their basic training at Chico Army Air Field since the school was established under the AAF training command two years ago, field officials announced today. The official activation date was in the middle of April, 1942. These budding pilots have gone on to advanced training and then to ‘combat,’ where they have been decorated for valor in action. During these two years, students and instructors together have spent more than 350,000 hours in the air. This would amount to almost 50,000,000 miles of travel. — Chico Daily Enterprise, April 24, 1944 100 YEARS AGO Butte County Honors Her Boys From Overseas Amid ringing bells and shrieking whistles, salvos of bombs and cheers of multitudes, the train with the 159th Infantry pulled into the Western Pacific depot at Oroville Saturday. They filed from coaches into formation, and led by their band, started a triumphal march on the main streets of the “City of Gold.” Pretty girls strewed flowers in their path as the boys from overseas marched with stately tread. No boyish faces that left 10 months ago were to be seen. With the faces of men, stern, businesslike and tanned by the weather, with eyes straight ahead, an exemplification of rigorous training, they passed in review. Next came the troops, the Oroville boys’ band and the county service flag, escorted by two returned Butte County boys. Then, bringing a tear to many eyes, and a choking feeling in the throats of strong men, came the honor roll. Upborn by two young men was a standard, each side a Howard Christy Chandler poster of Americans All. Between these figures of a beautiful woman and under the outstretched arm with wreath were the Butte county heroes, 36 in number. Col. Leonard M. Farrell, Comd. 159th, wrote this for The Enterprise: I have witnessed many spectacles of joy and animation in my military experience, but the first real reception the 159th has received since the troops landed in New York, was given today by Butte County. The trip across the continent was restless for us. We were so glad to get back after over eight months in France that we had to open the valve of our pent up feelings. The welcome was a royal one. It has been said that “San Francisco knows how.” Butte county does, too![related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] — Chico Daily Enterprise, April 28, 1919
22 Apr 19
Red Around the World

Trail of the Ancients is a scenic drive taking you to various sites featuring ancient Anasazi ruins and culture in Southeast Utah and Southwest Colorado.  From Mesa Verde to Monument Valley and Ruins to petroglyphs, this Colorado and Utah road trip will help you see it all. The map I’ve included doesn’t show a route, but […]

21 Apr 19
Archy Worldys

CLOSE The most recent patient is an unvaccinated woman who has been hospitalized and was put in isolation. Mike Chapman, Wochit Editor's note: This story is a public service to our community. Health officials say a third case of measles has been confirmed in Shasta County. The newest patient is an adult resident who was […]