Butte County

23 Jan 19
The-Ski-Guru

Audi Power of Four Ski Mountaineering Race Mar. 2-3 – New United States Ski Mountaineering Association National Championship  For the ninth year in a row, Aspen Snowmass, is scheduled to host the Audi Power of Four Ski Mountaineering Race Saturday, Mar. 2. For athletes not quite ready to take on the full course, participants have […]

23 Jan 19
Anderson Valley Advertiser

In the 1800s women were seldom accorded their own identity in print. Emblematic of that was the newspaper notice of a baby born on New Year’s Day, 1879, in the town of Mendocino. The mother was identified in the local paper by her husband’s first initial and his surname. Anna Morrison Reed was an exception […]

23 Jan 19
Oroville Mercury-Register
The Community Action Agency of Butte County, Inc., North State Food Bank, will hold a Tailgate Food Giveway from 9 a.m.-noon Friday at the Masonic Lodge, 1110 W. East Ave., Chico. Shelf stable food items like pasta, canned food, toiletries and other items will be distributed while supplies last. Representatives from the Agency will assist the public with information about other Community Action Agency programs available. For further information or questions, call 712-2883.
23 Jan 19
Chico Enterprise-Record
The Community Action Agency of Butte County, Inc., North State Food Bank, will hold a Tailgate Food Giveway from 9 a.m.-noon Friday at the Masonic Lodge, 1110 W. East Ave., Chico. Shelf stable food items like pasta, canned food, toiletries and other items will be distributed while supplies last. Representatives from the Agency will assist the public with information about other Community Action Agency programs available. For further information or questions, call 712-2883.
23 Jan 19
Anderson Valley Advertiser

KEEP OUT, WE LOVE YOU. If you don’t have one of those blue/orange/green yard signs advertising your love for everyone

23 Jan 19
CowboyPoetry.com

“Reading the News,” by Erwin E. Smith, c. 1908 from The Library of Congress We receive and come across all sorts of interesting information from a wide range of sources. Below, we gather some quick links to news stories, web features, and other items of interest gathered from the web, social media, and from you, […]

23 Jan 19
Lake County Record-Bee
Gavin Newsom had scarcely been inaugurated as governor when two crises erupted – a strike by teachers in the Los Angeles Unified School District and a declaration by Pacific Gas and Electric Co. that it would file for bankruptcy. United Teachers of Los Angeles is demanding salary increases and smaller class sizes, while PG&E is facing at least $30 billion in claims for wildfire damages, including the virtual destruction of Paradise in Butte County. They are obviously early tests of the new governor’s skills of negotiation and mediation. However, the woes of the nation’s second-largest school district, with more than a half-million students, and the nation’s largest private utility, with 16 million ratepayers, also are symptoms of a larger societal malady. As California evolved into the nation’s most populous state, with 40 million residents, it developed large private and public organizations to provide their services, including the two now in crisis. One could add the nation’s largest public university systems, the University of California and the California State University System, its largest public pension trust fund, the California Public Employees Retirement System, and several of the nation’s largest banks. The California-based digital revolution also spawned immense technology corporations such as Facebook and Apple. And, of course, its state government, which disburses upwards of $300 billion a year, is second only to the federal government in size. The state is a laboratory, testing whether bigger service institutions are better institutions. The crises in LA Unified and PG&E imply that they are plagued by a form of arrogance that could be called “too big to fail.” The term arose in the last decade to describe immense banking institutions whose cupidity sparked the deepest recession since the Great Depression and were rescued by infusions of cash from the federal government. The attitude entices those who run big institutions to make decisions on the implicit assumption that if they backfire, someone will bail them out. It’s very evident in LA Unified, whose unions have consistently demanded and won contracts that the district could not afford, driving it to the brink of insolvency. Its teachers union is now demanding a package that would cost $1 billion more a year even though its superintendent, Austin Beutner, says the district is already on track to spend $24 billion over three years while receiving just $22 billion in revenue. The 2018 wildfire damage claims now facing PG&E follow those of 2017, which the Legislature last year allowed it to cover with bonds that its ratepayers will repay over years, boosting consumer rates that were already among the nation’s highest. It would take a book to catalog the arrogant excesses of California’s other big institutions such as the University of California, CalPERS and state agencies like the Department of Motor Vehicles. And then there are the sins of Silicon Valley that have lately emerged, particularly those of Facebook in mishandling their users’ private information. The syndrome will continue to plague the state unless its leaders stop being enablers, refuse demands for handouts and bailouts and force big institutions to face the consequences of their irresponsible acts. If they are too big to be allowed to fail, it’s time to make them smaller and/or more accountable to customers, ratepayers and taxpayers. That broader issue is also a test for Newsom, who professes a commitment to fundamentally reforming how vital services are provided.
23 Jan 19
Lake County Record-Bee
PG&E has obtained billions in financing so the cash-strapped company can provide power safely during its pending bankruptcy — a potentially byzantine insolvency that could take two years to resolve in the wake of a series of deadly wildfires in Northern California — the embattled utility said Tuesday. JPMorgan Chase Bank, Bank of America, Barclays Bank and Citigroup Global Markets have teamed up to provide PG&E with $5.5 billion in what is called “debtor-in-possession financing” that assures PG&E can provide electricity and gas services while its bankruptcy case pushes ahead. “PG&E currently expects the Chapter 11 cases to take, subject to satisfaction of certain terms and conditions, approximately two years,” the utility said Tuesday in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission. However, the lending package also allows PG&E to extend the financing for an additional year should the bankruptcy proceeding drag on. San Francisco-based PG&E has moved to the brink of bankruptcy because it must confront a mountain of liabilities and debts, totaling as much as $30 billion by some estimates, that have arisen from the lethal and disastrous wildfires of 2017 and 2018 in Northern California. State fire investigators have determined that PG&E’s equipment and facilities were the cause of 17 deadly infernos in the North Bay Wine Country and nearby regions in October 2017. Separately, PG&E has revealed that it suffered equipment failures in the origin area of a catastrophic and fatal wildfire in November 2018 that scorched Butte County, killed at least 86 people and essentially destroyed the town of Paradise. The company hopes to reorganize the finances and restructure the debts of the utility and the holding company that owns the utility’s gas and electricity operations through a Chapter 11 bankruptcy proceeding. The bankruptcy filing is expected to occur sometime around Jan. 29, PG&E stated. In 2001, PG&E filed for bankruptcy primarily because the utility subsidiary was whipsawed financially due to manipulation by wholesalers of the energy markets. The state Public Utilities Commission in 2004, as part of its responsibility to approve the settlement of the 2001 bankruptcy case, approved a deal that gave PG&E customers average increases in electricity rates that ranged from $1,300 to $1,700 over a 10-year period. State regulators have to sign off on any bankruptcy court deals this time as well. The commission is investigating allegations that PG&E falsified records involving its gas pipeline system and operations from 2012 through 2017. “Utility falsification of safety related records is a serious violation of law and diminishes our trust in the utility’s reports on their progress,” PUC president Michael Picker said in December. In 2010, PG&E caused a gas explosion that killed eight and destroyed a San Bruno neighborhood. Federal investigators subsequently determined that disaster arose from a lethal combination of the company’s flawed record keeping, shoddy maintenance and the PUC’s lazy supervision of PG&E. A federal jury in 2016 convicted PG&E of felonies and crimes committed before and after the San Bruno blast. This financing, the SEC filing stated, would be considered a senior secured liability — which means these big banks would be repaid ahead of other secured creditors that might have leverage on PG&E in the form of some sort of collateral. Potentially at the back of the line to collect from PG&E: unsecured creditors who don’t have any collateral, such as fire victims. The utility stated in the SEC filing that it may seek a swift bankruptcy court hearing so it can quickly tap $1.5 billion of the $5.5 billion, which could be an indication of the company’s lack of cash flow. Wall Street basked in the afterglow of the financing announcement. PG&E shares jumped 6.5 percent and closed at $7.70 Tuesday. “PG&E expects that the (financing) will provide it with sufficient liquidity to fund its ongoing operations, including its ability to provide safe service to customers during the Chapter 11 cases,” PG&E stated in the SEC filing.
23 Jan 19
InsuranceCanvas

News – Insurance Journal Insurance Journal delivers the latest business news for the Property/Casualty insurance industry Texas Sunset Board: Legislature Needs to Decide Nature of Windstorm Insurer by Stephanie K. Jones on 2019-01-23 at 07:20To be the insurer of last resort for wind and hail insurance along the Texas coast, without state support and reliant on premium dollars […]

23 Jan 19
CBS San Francisco

Two months after the Camp Fire in Paradise, some of the victims who lost their homes are moving to the Bay Area and are getting resettled with the help of social media.

23 Jan 19
Paradise Post
A business recovery assistance forum will be held on Friday for all business owners who have been impacted by the Camp Fire. Representatives from the town of Paradise, the Paradise Chamber of Commerce, Butte County, 3Core, ChicoStart, Alliance for Workforce Development, Butte College, the Chico Chamber of Commerce, the Small Business Administration and the Small Business Development Center will be attending. The forum will include information about the deadline to file for assistance from the SBA and the Federal Emergency Management Agency, a question and answer session and any and all updates for recovery. Residents are invited to attend the business recovery assistance forum from 10 a.m. to noon Friday at Bidwell Presbyterian Church inside Westminister Fellowship Hall located at 208 West First St. in Chico.
23 Jan 19
Chico Enterprise-Record
With the deadline to apply for disaster assistance approaching, a Disaster Recovery Center is opening Wednesday in Paradise to provide residents impacted by the Camp Fire with state and federal disaster resources. The registration deadline for federal disaster assistance is Jan. 31. Survivors are encouraged to file insurance claims for damages to their homes, cars and businesses before applying for FEMA assistance. Disaster centers are jointly operated by the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services and the Federal Emergency Management Agency. The centers offer information concerning resources available to homeowners, renters and business owners who sustained damage as a result of the Camp Fire. Recovery centers are accessible for individuals with disabilities and access and functional needs. The centers have on-site communication accessibility tools, including amplified listening devices, Video Relay Interpreting and Cap Tel phones. ASL interpreters are available upon request. Registration with FEMA can be completed at any Disaster Recovery Center, online at DisasterAssistance.gov or by calling the FEMA Helpline at 1-800-621-3362 or TTY 1-800-462-7585. Multi-lingual operators are available. The toll free numbers are open daily from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. Survivors may also apply for low-interest disaster loans with the Small Business Administration at the nearest recovery center, online at SBA.gov/disaster, or by contacting SBA’s Disaster Assistance Customer Service Center by calling 1-800-659-2955. Californians impacted by the wildfires that started on Nov. 8 in Butte and Los Angeles counties can find their nearest Disaster Recovery Center at http.//egateway.fema.gov/ESF6/DRCLocator or by texting 43362 with the message DRC and their ZIP code. Standard data and messaging rates apply. The DRC will open at 10 a.m. Wednesday. The hours are from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday located at 1080 Ewald Court  at the Creative Learning Center.[related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]
23 Jan 19
Paradise Post
With the deadline to apply for disaster assistance approaching, a Disaster Recovery Center is opening Wednesday in Paradise to provide residents impacted by the Camp Fire with state and federal disaster resources. The registration deadline for federal disaster assistance is Jan. 31. Survivors are encouraged to file insurance claims for damages to their homes, cars and businesses before applying for FEMA assistance. Disaster centers are jointly operated by the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services and the Federal Emergency Management Agency. The centers offer information concerning resources available to homeowners, renters and business owners who sustained damage as a result of the Camp Fire. Recovery centers are accessible for individuals with disabilities and access and functional needs. The centers have on-site communication accessibility tools, including amplified listening devices, Video Relay Interpreting and Cap Tel phones. ASL interpreters are available upon request. Registration with FEMA can be completed at any Disaster Recovery Center, online at DisasterAssistance.gov or by calling the FEMA Helpline at 1-800-621-3362 or TTY 1-800-462-7585. Multi-lingual operators are available. The toll free numbers are open daily from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. Survivors may also apply for low-interest disaster loans with the Small Business Administration at the nearest recovery center, online at SBA.gov/disaster, or by contacting SBA’s Disaster Assistance Customer Service Center by calling 1-800-659-2955. Californians impacted by the wildfires that started on Nov. 8 in Butte and Los Angeles counties can find their nearest Disaster Recovery Center at http.//egateway.fema.gov/ESF6/DRCLocator or by texting 43362 with the message DRC and their ZIP code. Standard data and messaging rates apply. The DRC will open at 10 a.m. Wednesday. The hours are from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday located at 1080 Ewald Court  at the Creative Learning Center.[related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]
23 Jan 19
Oroville Mercury-Register
Joseph Rabetoy, 39, was the second-youngest person to die in the Camp Fire, among the 67 identified so far. Rabetoy lived in a manufactured home or trailer on Angel Drive, near Pearson Road and Clark Road. He apparently lived alone. It was a small home almost hidden by trees, with a greenbelt of trees behind his back yard. The Camp Fire consumed the neighborhood. Rabetoy died in his home. Rabetoy’s parents declined to be interviewed. According to public records he had lived in Paradise since at least 2014. He had a criminal record, with convictions in Salt Lake County, Utah, and in Butte County. His most recent arrest was five years ago, with two misdemeanor convictions. Share your memories by clicking here in our guest book for Joseph or at campfirelives@chicoer.com. Read more profiles on our remembrance page. 
23 Jan 19
The Disaster Chat Show

Everyone has their own takeaway lessons from witnessing or suffering a disaster. For myself, the wildfires of the past few years in my home state of California have scorched counties next door to mine, leaving an indelible imprint on me. I’ve done some of my own investigation and a lot of thinking in their wake. […]