Dana Rohrabacher

21 Nov 18
ORANGE COUNTY TRIBUNE

The blue wave that washed Democrats into control of the U.S. House of Representatives is hitting a high tide in Orange County as well. All seven Congressional seats serving Orange County were won by Democratic candidates in the Nov. 6 balloting, including the much-watched 48th District (Huntington Beach-Costa Mesa) post held by 30-year incumbent conservative […]

20 Nov 18
Thiên Hạ Sự 2018

Thượng nghị sĩ cấp bang Đảng Cộng hòa Janet Nguyễn đã bị đối thủ Đảng Dân chủ Tom Umberg qua mặt trong một cuộc đua tranh ghế đại diện Địa hạt Thượng viện 34 của bang California, theo kết quả kiểm phiếu mới nhất được Quận Cam (Orange County) công bố vào chiều tối thứ […]

20 Nov 18
Orange County Register
#gallery-6603299-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-6603299-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-6603299-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-6603299-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Ocean View School District board member Gina Clayton-Tarvin shows a Facebook post by Michael Gates, the Huntington Beach City Attorney, on a Huntington Beach community Facebook page. Clayton-Tarvin claims the post mocks her divorce. (File photo by Paul Bersebach, Orange County Register/SCNG) Michael Gates was sworn in as Huntington Beach city attorney after winning a hard-fought election in 2014. Huntington Beach is the only city in Orange County, and one of only 10 in California, that elects its city attorney. (File photo by Daniel Langhorne, Orange County Register/SCNG) On Facebook, Huntington Beach City Attorney Michael Gates slammed Ocean View School District trustees who voted to oust Gracey Van Der Mark from a committee. Van Der Mark, who recently lost her school board bid, is a controversial due to her affiliation with white supremicists.(File photo by Jennifer Cappuccio Maher, The Sun/SCNG) John Briscoe, a trustee for the Ocean View School District, butted heads with Huntington Beach City Attorney Michael Gates over his vote to remove a controversial school board candidate from a committee. (Courtesy of John Briscoe) Huntington Beach City Attorney Michael Gates ran unopposed this year after winning a hard-fought election in 2014. He is the only city attorney in Orange County, and one of only 10 in California, who is elected by popular vote. Some say city attorney elections can politicize the office. (Photo courtesy of Michael Gates) Huntington Beach City Attorney Michael Gates and his wife Kelly Gates have pubicly butted heads with other local officials over a controversial school board candidate. (Photo courtesy of Michael Gates) Huntington Beach is the only city in Orange County that elects its city attorney. Michael Gates won that honor four years ago in a hard-fought election. This time around, Gates ran unopposed. But he was just as enthusiastic – promoting his accomplishments and criticizing his detractors on social media, and even hosting a “meet and greet” for several Orange County Republican candidates. By Nov. 7, the day after the midterm election, Gates already was looking ahead to 2020. On a Facebook community page, he shared an admirer’s note urging him to run for higher office. “Since it appears Congressional Dist. 48 went to Harley Rouda, I’ve received a number of contacts like this one. Interesting,” Gates wrote about the seat long held by Dana Rohrabacher. All but 10 California cities appoint rather than elect their city attorneys. Often, city attorneys are hired on contract and bill by the hour. Gates, on the other hand, is a full-time city employee earning an annual salary of $236,000. Unlike Huntington Beach City Council positions, the job does not have a term limit. His staff includes a chief assistant city attorney paid $183,000 and a stable of part-time employees. At the Nov. 5 City Council meeting, Gates requested three more employees to fulfill his mission of closing down illegal businesses – a proposal the council declined 5-2. Codified in Huntington Beach’s charter in 1937, electing a city attorney comes with advantages and disadvantages. “It allows me independence,” Gates said. “I don’t work for the city manager or the city council, but for the people I represent. I have to show results.” Gates said he has saved the city “millions of dollars” by fighting lawsuits against it instead of settling out of court. And, he said, elections allow him to be less “concerned by the city council’s political winds and pressures.” But the opposite can also be true, argued Sarah Hill, associate professor of political science at Cal State Fullerton. “If you have to run for office, you’re going to be more of a political animal, always thinking about reelection,” she said. “Most administration positions are better off appointed.” A century ago, as a remedy to nepotism and other corruption, some cities switched to elections for jobs such as city clerk and city attorney, Hill said: “Years later, they have forgotten to ask themselves, ‘Why, again, is this an elected position?’” Furthermore, campaigns cost money. On an Oct. 21 Facebook post, Gates said he still owes $60,000 for his 2014 endeavor. “ANY donation amount will help,” Gates entreated, adding a link to a fundraising site. In its “Ethical Principles for City Attorneys” protocol, the League of California Cities admonishes against politicization of the office. Advice should not appear “based on political alignment or partisanship,” nor should a city attorney “participate in the campaigns of that city’s officials,” the directive reads. But that can be a tall order for an elected official who wants to stay in the game. On Sept. 15, Gates hosted a meet-and-greet at his house for Rohrabacher, Orange County District Attorney Tony Rackauckas and two city council candidates. Afterward, he posted a photo of the event on Facebook. Gates frequently communicates with like-minded residents on a conservative-leaning community Facebook page. “Facebook allows me to have direct contact with people in the community, and it’s free,” Gates said. But online conversations can quickly become bitter – as have interactions between Gates and Ocean View School District trustee Gina Clayton-Tarvin. It’s hard to imagine now, but Gates and Clayton-Tarvin used to be friends. When Gates first ran for city attorney in 2014, Clayton-Tarvin held a fundraiser for him in her home. But in recent years, anything resembling cordiality would become a casualty of political differences. In the weeks leading up to Election Day, the two took to Facebook to quarrel over controversial Ocean View school board candidate Gracey Van Der Mark – for whom Gates’ wife hosted a campaign party. The spat reached a crescendo when, on Oct. 28, Gates seemed to mock Clayton-Tarvin for her pending divorce. Underneath a photo of him and his wife smiling happily, Gates posted the comment: “Poor Gina. She has driven everyone away. Even those CLOSEST to her, gone. Too bad.” Later, Gates purported he wasn’t aware of Clayton-Tarvin’s divorce and didn’t intend to ridicule it. “She looks for fights and enjoys the false victimhood she creates,” he said on Facebook. In an interview, Clayton-Tarvin said her divorce is “public knowledge,” claiming she previously discussed it with Gates on at least two occasions. The  League of California Cities counsels that city attorneys “should not personally attack or denigrate individuals, particularly in public forums.” That decree was issued in 2005, before the temptations of Facebook turn a firm hold. Two weeks before Election Day, Gates singled out city council candidate Dan Kalmick, a Democrat, for using the Huntington Beach logo on his campaign material. “Consequence of illegally using the official HB Logo is the potential to face a lawsuit. Please stop!!!” Gates warned on Facebook. But, in fact, the image, likewise used by other candidates, is not trademarked. Gates later apologized on the same site for his mistake. Gates also has been known to lash out against fellow Republicans who disagree with him, including John Briscoe – an Ocean View trustee who joined Clayton-Tarvin in voting last April to remove Van Der Mark  from a school district committee. Van Der Mark drew condemnation for her affiliation with alt-right groups, as well as for social media posts that some consider anti-Semitic and racist. She lost her school board bid to Briscoe and two other candidates. Simultaneously, Briscoe ran for Congress against Democrat incumbent Alan Lowenthal, who won. More focused on the school board race and Van Der Mark, Gates referred to Briscoe as “creepy” in one Facebook post. Briscoe didn’t respond. “What’s the point? It just brings out an endless stream of negativity,” Briscoe said. As for Clayton-Tarvin, his more Facebook-active colleague, Briscoe added, “I wish Gina wouldn’t engage.” In most towns, residents would be hard-pressed to name their city attorney. But, often involved in newsworthy lawsuits, Gates is a bit of a local celebrity. For instance, most other Orange County cities wanting to protest California’s “sanctuary law” signed amicus briefs supporting the federal government’s lawsuit – a relatively inexpensive show of dissent. The new state law limits some interactions between police and immigration officers. Huntington Beach went a big step further by suing California. So far, Gates has prevailed in court. On Sept. 27, an Orange County Superior judge sided with the city, agreeing that its charter grants it broad self-governing authority. But last week, the California Department of Justice filed an intent to appeal the ruling – meaning more time and resources spent on more courtroom proceedings. In April, Gates filed a lawsuit against resident Daniel Horgan to stop his petition for a gun-control ballot initiative, saying it “hits the Second Amendment between the eyes.” The city later dropped the suit after Horgan ended his floundering effort to collect signatures. Huntington Beach benefits from a proactive approach to litigation that appointed city attorneys might not venture into, Gates said. “For them, it’s just a paycheck,” Gates said. “They are more likely to take the easier path. Huntington Beach is out there taking on important battles – and winning.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]
20 Nov 18
Confounded Interest

Did the Dow Smart Money Flow index signal the recent decline in the tech sector? Follow the smart money!! On a different note, a friend of mine from Columbus, OH, Harley Rouda Jr, (D) just defeated Dana Rohrabacher (R) for a Congressional seat from … Huntington Beach CA.

20 Nov 18
Alaturka

– With Bolton as key influence and military the main US actor in Syria, Turkish observers should not expect drastic changes

20 Nov 18
Alaturka Online

With Bolton as key influence and military the main US actor in Syria, Turkish observers should not expect drastic changes

20 Nov 18
The National Memo

California Republicans lost six seats, including every seat in the former GOP stronghold of Orange County.

20 Nov 18
Orange County Register
The tight race for California Senate District 34 took a shift Monday, when Democrat Tom Umberg pulled ahead of Republican incumbent, state Sen. Janet Nguyen. Umberg, a retired U.S. Army colonel and previous assemblyman, was leading for the first time since Election Day with 50.09 percent of the votes to Nguyen’s 49.91 percent, according to data released Monday by voting officials. Umberg had 126,824 votes and Nguyen had 126,386 votes, reversing a lead held by Nguyen since the Nov. 6 election. Whether Umberg keeps his lead and wins the contest “could come down to turnout and attitudes voters have toward (President Donald) Trump,” said Paul Mitchell, vice president of Political Data, Inc. It’s unclear how many ballots are left to be counted in the district. There are a total of 91,338 ballots left to be tallied in Orange County and an estimated 422,600 left in Los Angeles County. “What’s interesting is how much it shifted from a safe Nguyen victory to a potential Umberg win,” Mitchell said. “Later ballots trended more Democratic,” he said. “Younger voters, Latinos, renters; they showed up later with same day registration and provisional ballots,” Mitchell said. “Those take longer to process and that’s why we’re seeing them now.” If Nguyen loses, “she could be a casualty of national reaction to Trump,” Mitchell added. “She has an ‘R’ next to her name, and that could (make the) difference.” Another Orange County incumbent trailing in his bid for re-election was Assemblyman Matthew Harper, a Republican from Huntington Beach. Democrat Cottie Petrie-Norris was leading late Monday with 96,238 votes, or 52.5 percent of the ballots counted, to Harper’s 87,082 votes, or 47.5 percent. If Nguyen and Harper lose, their races would be “collateral damage” of a Democratic wave that swept Orange County congressional districts, Mitchell said.  For the first time since the depression, Orange County is projected to have no Republicans representing the county that once was virtually synonymous with GOP power and influence. The state Senate 34th District includes Little Saigon and parts or all of Seal Beach, Huntington Beach and other north Orange County communities, as well as a portion of Long Beach. In Orange County, where the bulk of the district sits, Nguyen was ahead of Umberg with 50.5 percent of the votes. But in Long Beach, Umberg led with 54.52 percent of the vote to Nguyen’s 45.48 percent, according to the latest numbers reported by the Los Angeles Registrar of Voters, which last had an update on Friday. Both registrars plan to issue vote updates on Tuesday, Nov. 20. Umberg, 63, an attorney first elected to the California State Assembly in 1990, went up against Nguyen once before. In 2007, he ran for the Orange County Board of Supervisors but came in third place. Nguyen won that race. Nguyen, 42, is viewed as a moderate Republican. She has served on the Garden Grove City Council, the Orange County Board of Supervisors and more recently the state Senate, where in 2014 she became the first Vietnamese American elected to the office and the country’s first Vietnamese American woman state legislator. MORE ELECTION STORIES: New Congress could change tone, if not rules, on immigration  AP calls Harley Rouda winner in race against Dana Rohrabacher Election: Voter registration at DMV churns up big numbers, big questions In the age of Trump, reaching Latino voters hits all angles as midterms approach Harley Rouda’s triumph over Dana Rohrabacher signals end of GOP’s O.C. congressional dominance Congresswoman-elect Katie Porter will take aim at campaign finance and voting rights; backs Pelosi for speaker
20 Nov 18
Press Telegram
The tight race for California Senate District 34 took a shift Monday, when Democrat Tom Umberg pulled ahead of Republican incumbent, state Sen. Janet Nguyen. Umberg, a retired U.S. Army colonel and previous assemblyman, was leading for the first time since Election Day with 50.09 percent of the votes to Nguyen’s 49.91 percent, according to data released Monday by voting officials. Umberg had 126,824 votes and Nguyen had 126,386 votes, reversing a lead held by Nguyen since the Nov. 6 election. Whether Umberg keeps his lead and wins the contest “could come down to turnout and attitudes voters have toward (President Donald) Trump,” said Paul Mitchell, vice president of Political Data, Inc. It’s unclear how many ballots are left to be counted in the district. There are a total of 91,338 ballots left to be tallied in Orange County and an estimated 422,600 left in Los Angeles County. “What’s interesting is how much it shifted from a safe Nguyen victory to a potential Umberg win,” Mitchell said. “Later ballots trended more Democratic,” he said. “Younger voters, Latinos, renters; they showed up later with same day registration and provisional ballots,” Mitchell said. “Those take longer to process and that’s why we’re seeing them now.” If Nguyen loses, “she could be a casualty of national reaction to Trump,” Mitchell added. “She has an ‘R’ next to her name, and that could (make the) difference.” Another Orange County incumbent trailing in his bid for re-election was Assemblyman Matthew Harper, a Republican from Huntington Beach. Democrat Cottie Petrie-Norris was leading late Monday with 96,238 votes, or 52.5 percent of the ballots counted, to Harper’s 87,082 votes, or 47.5 percent. If Nguyen and Harper lose, their races would be “collateral damage” of a Democratic wave that swept Orange County congressional districts, Mitchell said.  For the first time since the depression, Orange County is projected to have no Republicans representing the county that once was virtually synonymous with GOP power and influence. The state Senate 34th District includes Little Saigon and parts or all of Seal Beach, Huntington Beach and other north Orange County communities, as well as a portion of Long Beach. In Orange County, where the bulk of the district sits, Nguyen was ahead of Umberg with 50.5 percent of the votes. But in Long Beach, Umberg led with 54.52 percent of the vote to Nguyen’s 45.48 percent, according to the latest numbers reported by the Los Angeles Registrar of Voters, which last had an update on Friday. Both registrars plan to issue vote updates on Tuesday, Nov. 20. Umberg, 63, an attorney first elected to the California State Assembly in 1990, went up against Nguyen once before. In 2007, he ran for the Orange County Board of Supervisors but came in third place. Nguyen won that race. Nguyen, 42, is viewed as a moderate Republican. She has served on the Garden Grove City Council, the Orange County Board of Supervisors and more recently the state Senate, where in 2014 she became the first Vietnamese American elected to the office and the country’s first Vietnamese American woman state legislator. MORE ELECTION STORIES: New Congress could change tone, if not rules, on immigration  AP calls Harley Rouda winner in race against Dana Rohrabacher Election: Voter registration at DMV churns up big numbers, big questions In the age of Trump, reaching Latino voters hits all angles as midterms approach Harley Rouda’s triumph over Dana Rohrabacher signals end of GOP’s O.C. congressional dominance Congresswoman-elect Katie Porter will take aim at campaign finance and voting rights; backs Pelosi for speaker
20 Nov 18
SCNG
The tight race for California Senate District 34 took a shift Monday, when Democrat Tom Umberg pulled ahead of Republican incumbent, state Sen. Janet Nguyen. Umberg, a retired U.S. Army colonel and previous assemblyman, was leading for the first time since Election Day with 50.09 percent of the votes to Nguyen’s 49.91 percent, according to data released Monday by voting officials. Umberg had 126,824 votes and Nguyen had 126,386 votes, reversing a lead held by Nguyen since the Nov. 6 election. Whether Umberg keeps his lead and wins the contest “could come down to turnout and attitudes voters have toward (President Donald) Trump,” said Paul Mitchell, vice president of Political Data, Inc. It’s unclear how many ballots are left to be counted in the district. There are a total of 91,338 ballots left to be tallied in Orange County and an estimated 422,600 left in Los Angeles County. “What’s interesting is how much it shifted from a safe Nguyen victory to a potential Umberg win,” Mitchell said. “Later ballots trended more Democratic,” he said. “Younger voters, Latinos, renters; they showed up later with same day registration and provisional ballots,” Mitchell said. “Those take longer to process and that’s why we’re seeing them now.” If Nguyen loses, “she could be a casualty of national reaction to Trump,” Mitchell added. “She has an ‘R’ next to her name, and that could (make the) difference.” Another Orange County incumbent trailing in his bid for re-election was Assemblyman Matthew Harper, a Republican from Huntington Beach. Democrat Cottie Petrie-Norris was leading late Monday with 96,238 votes, or 52.5 percent of the ballots counted, to Harper’s 87,082 votes, or 47.5 percent. If Nguyen and Harper lose, their races would be “collateral damage” of a Democratic wave that swept Orange County congressional districts, Mitchell said.  For the first time since the depression, Orange County is projected to have no Republicans representing the county that once was virtually synonymous with GOP power and influence. The state Senate 34th District includes Little Saigon and parts or all of Seal Beach, Huntington Beach and other north Orange County communities, as well as a portion of Long Beach. In Orange County, where the bulk of the district sits, Nguyen was ahead of Umberg with 50.5 percent of the votes. But in Long Beach, Umberg led with 54.52 percent of the vote to Nguyen’s 45.48 percent, according to the latest numbers reported by the Los Angeles Registrar of Voters, which last had an update on Friday. Both registrars plan to issue vote updates on Tuesday, Nov. 20. Umberg, 63, an attorney first elected to the California State Assembly in 1990, went up against Nguyen once before. In 2007, he ran for the Orange County Board of Supervisors but came in third place. Nguyen won that race. Nguyen, 42, is viewed as a moderate Republican. She has served on the Garden Grove City Council, the Orange County Board of Supervisors and more recently the state Senate, where in 2014 she became the first Vietnamese American elected to the office and the country’s first Vietnamese American woman state legislator. MORE ELECTION STORIES: New Congress could change tone, if not rules, on immigration  AP calls Harley Rouda winner in race against Dana Rohrabacher Election: Voter registration at DMV churns up big numbers, big questions In the age of Trump, reaching Latino voters hits all angles as midterms approach Harley Rouda’s triumph over Dana Rohrabacher signals end of GOP’s O.C. congressional dominance Congresswoman-elect Katie Porter will take aim at campaign finance and voting rights; backs Pelosi for speaker
19 Nov 18
E-Militia.com

VOTER FRAUD: Orange County Numbers DON’T ADD UP – Democrats Had 300,000 More Votes for Congressional Seats than for Governor by Jim Hoft November 19, 2018 Orange County, a traditionally conservative enclave in Southern California turned all blue after Democrats found tens of thousands of votes post election day. Just two years ago in 2016, […]

19 Nov 18
Update News Portal

President Trump’s $1.5 trillion tax cut was supposed to be a big selling point for congressional Republicans in the midterm elections. Instead, it appears to have done more to hurt, than help, Republicans in high-tax districts across California, New Jersey, Virginia and other states. House Republicans suffered heavy Election Day losses in districts where large […]

19 Nov 18
Suit Up Maine

Democrats flipped the U.S. House of Representatives and broke Republican strangleholds at the all-important state level, where redistricting decisions are made, not to mention countless laws that affect everyday life. These state and national Blue Wave wins are due in large part to the efforts of thousands of citizen activists who ran for office, worked on campaigns, educated voters, knocked on doors, made phone calls, sent postcards, and got out the vote for candidates who support a progressive agenda.

19 Nov 18
Just news update

President Trump’s $1.5 trillion tax cut was supposed to be a big selling point for congressional Republicans in the midterm elections. Instead, it appears to have done more to hurt, than help, Republicans in high-tax districts across California, New Jersey, Virginia and other states. House Republicans suffered heavy Election Day losses in districts where large […]

19 Nov 18
Arcynewsy

President Trump's $ 1.5 trillion tax cut should have been a strong point for Congress MPs in the mid-term elections. Instead, it seems to have done more harm than helping Republicans in high-tax districts in California, New Jersey, Virginia, and other states. Home Republicans have suffered heavy losses in elections in districts where large concentrations […]