Jennifer Aniston

22 Apr 19
Isabelle's Blog

Magazine research: i-D: i-D is a British bimonthly magazine which means it is a magazine that is produced twice a month or every two months, it is dedicated to fashion, art and music and youth culture. i-D was founded by designer Terry Jones in 1980. The first issues was published in the form of a […]

22 Apr 19

I know, Earth Day “should” be about saving the Earth, and rightly so. Then there is the mind of ill people, sucked into the depths of yuck-and-muck. What if we used Earth Day to celebrate the Earth, regardless of chronic illness? What if we could use the day as a vehicle to mind travel, wanderlust. […]

22 Apr 19
The Australian

The Blossom Ballroom at The Hollywood Roosevelt hotel is only a bit bigger than a tennis court. It is decorated in a vaguely Moorish style, with white walls and large lanterns dangling over an enormous patterned rug. There are no hordes of tourists tramping through it, no Instagrammers searching for the perfect vantage point, but this is still hallowed ground for the industry that defines Los Angeles. Ninety years ago the first Oscars ceremony was held in here.

22 Apr 19
Knowingly Undersold

Today! Because you’ve got to be a fucking Rembrandt to put on makeup – Switch (1991) Directed by Blake Edwards Starring Ellen Barkin, Jimmy Smits, JoBeth Williams, Lorraine Bracco (x2), Tony Roberts, Perry King, Lysette Anthony, Catherine Keener, Bruce Payne, Jim J. Bullock, Tea Leoni, Michael Badalucco, Victoria Mahoney, Basil Hoffman Not to be confused with […]

22 Apr 19
Financhill

There’s been a persistent and ongoing clash between Amazon.com (NASDAQ: AMZN) and Google, a subsidiary of Alphabet (NASDAQ: GOOGL) (NASDAQ: GOOG). The animosity goes back years. In 2014, Eric Schmidt, then Google’s executive chairman, characterized the rivalry between the tech giants: “Many people think our main competition is Bing or Yahoo. But, really, our biggest […]

21 Apr 19
Women's Film Library Project

BIO: Kristin Hahn is a writer and producer well known for her works Anthem (1997), In Search of Grace (2003), The Departed (2006), and Time Traveler’s Wife (2009).  Born in Omaha, Nebraska, Hahn grew up in New Mexico before moving to Los Angeles.  Hahn studied film at the University of Southern California.  She is a […]

21 Apr 19
The Australian

Until last week I had a bit of a soft spot for Helena Christensen. I interviewed her years ago and she was charming and clever and stunningly beautiful. Then last week, aged 50, she posted a picture of herself on Instagram wearing a swimming costume that failed in any way to protect her modesty.

21 Apr 19
How Can Deviated Septum Surgery Assist You

Content author-Skaarup Willis Making the decision to have cosmetic surgery is not always an easy one. While the possibilities are exciting, you may not know what to expect, or how to go through the process. Here are some tips to help you. The better prepared you will be for the surgery, and everything that goes […]

21 Apr 19
TODAY NEWS

CROSSING the road, I suddenly spotted him. He slowly looked me…

20 Apr 19
The Pat The Dog Blog

Righto, so as you’d already know if you’ve read the first two parts of this story, we’re now up to the really sad part. The part where I’m sitting in a vet’s waiting room anticipating the worst possible outcome. I remember the whole thing so vividly – sitting there waiting while families with young puppies […]

20 Apr 19
The Sun
CROSSING the road, I suddenly spotted him. He slowly looked me up and down and his smile slipped – he could see that I’d changed since I’d left him. “I haven’t seen you for ages,” he said, his voice partly hurt, partly gently accusing. I tucked a newly dyed blonde strand behind my ear, trying to hold his gaze. But this wasn’t an ex-lover – it was someone I had a far more intimate relationship with for over four years: my ex-hairdresser.   It can be incredibly easy to become attached to somebody just because they style your hair Everything had started off so well with Olly in 2010. He was recommended by a friend and our chemistry was instant. Just 45 minutes into our first appointment at a salon in Hertfordshire, I’d shared my hopes and dreams with him. He knew secrets I wouldn’t tell my closest friend, and in addition to unburdening myself, I left the salon looking like Jennifer Aniston in a hair advert. Fast-forward four years to our chance encounter, and as we awkwardly parted ways he asked if I wanted to book an appointment. I said I’d let him know. But what had happened between us? Like all relationships, we started taking each other for granted. It started with little niggles, like when he stopped checking if my layers were level with my cheekbones. Yet I knew it was over when he started snipping away without even asking me what I wanted. Alia Waheed decided it was time to leave her hairdresser when it seemed they started to want different things Although I knew it was best for me and my hair, it was so hard to leave him. But it begs the question: why is it so easy for us to get attached to someone just because they’ve styled your hair? I wouldn’t think twice about changing my dentist or doctor, yet finding a new hairdresser felt like cheating. More people commit to a “relationship” with their favourite hairdresser than to another person. According to one survey, while just 69% of adults have a romantic partner, nearly 75% of us enjoy a (purely monogamous) relationship with our hairdresser. “It’s a positive relationship based on trust that your hairdresser will not only make you look, but feel incredible, too,” says counselling psychologist and TV presenter Anjula Mutanda. “It can become a bit like a confessional. That closeness helps you open up more freely and that can arouse feelings of cheating and guilt if you go elsewhere.” More people commit to a ‘relationship’ with a hairdresser than to another person Besides your partner, no one gets more personal with you than the person treating your tresses. When I first met Olly, he felt like my bestie, counsellor and personal Gok Wan in one. But as with all relationships, you and your hairdresser can begin to want different things. If you cheat, you run the risk of getting caught, as TV presenter Mehreen Baig, 29, from London, learned. “At one appointment, my usual stylist asked what I wanted. I made the dire mistake of jokingly saying: ‘Do what you like,’” Mehreen admits. “It was two days after Victoria Beckham had her famous ‘pob’ cut done and minutes later, my waist-length hair was lying in a pile on the floor. “My hairdresser asked if I liked it and I nodded silently, then cried buckets before going to another salon to have hair extensions. He saw me in the street a few days later and I don’t know who looked more horrified.” But trying out a new hairdresser can sometimes backfire – leaving you to go crawling back to your old stylist Kate Richards, 41, a marketing consultant from Watford, also strayed, but returned to her stylist. “I thought a side fringe would make me look younger, but my stylist said it wouldn’t suit me. “The new hairdresser cut in a fringe that looked as though I’d done it myself. I went back to my old stylist and apologised – luckily he was nice about it.” If you stray, it’s usually best to fess up, according to stylist to the stars Louis Byrne, whose celeb clients include Emma Willis. “A hairdresser can tell if someone else has done your hair,” he says. “If there is a reason why you went elsewhere, apologise, tell them why and give them a chance to try and sort it out.” Going back to an old hairdresser can be harder than leaving them in the first place [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN FABULOUS” posts_category=”363″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] As for me, I realised my new salon wasn’t actually very good. But going back to Olly – which I did a couple of months after our awkward street encounter – was harder than cheating on him in the first place. It was only when I told him I was moving house and would have to leave him for good that a peace treaty was truly brokered between us. He even told my new stylist in London what tints he used to get my shade. And in case you’re wondering, I’ve now been faithful to my current hairdresser, Tee, for four years. [bc_video video_id=”6024055002001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”There’s a new Tangle Teezer hairbrush with shorter teeth designed specifically for people with fine or coloured hair”] Source: *Direct Line For Business
20 Apr 19
The Scottish Sun
CROSSING the road, I suddenly spotted him. He slowly looked me up and down and his smile slipped – he could see that I’d changed since I’d left him. “I haven’t seen you for ages,” he said, his voice partly hurt, partly gently accusing. I tucked a newly dyed blonde strand behind my ear, trying to hold his gaze. But this wasn’t an ex-lover – it was someone I had a far more intimate relationship with for over four years: my ex-hairdresser.   It can be incredibly easy to become attached to somebody just because they style your hair Everything had started off so well with Olly in 2010. He was recommended by a friend and our chemistry was instant. Just 45 minutes into our first appointment at a salon in Hertfordshire, I’d shared my hopes and dreams with him. He knew secrets I wouldn’t tell my closest friend, and in addition to unburdening myself, I left the salon looking like Jennifer Aniston in a hair advert. Fast-forward four years to our chance encounter, and as we awkwardly parted ways he asked if I wanted to book an appointment. I said I’d let him know. But what had happened between us? Like all relationships, we started taking each other for granted. It started with little niggles, like when he stopped checking if my layers were level with my cheekbones. Yet I knew it was over when he started snipping away without even asking me what I wanted. Alia Waheed decided it was time to leave her hairdresser when it seemed they started to want different things Although I knew it was best for me and my hair, it was so hard to leave him. But it begs the question: why is it so easy for us to get attached to someone just because they’ve styled your hair? I wouldn’t think twice about changing my dentist or doctor, yet finding a new hairdresser felt like cheating. More people commit to a “relationship” with their favourite hairdresser than to another person. According to one survey, while just 69% of adults have a romantic partner, nearly 75% of us enjoy a (purely monogamous) relationship with our hairdresser. “It’s a positive relationship based on trust that your hairdresser will not only make you look, but feel incredible, too,” says counselling psychologist and TV presenter Anjula Mutanda. “It can become a bit like a confessional. That closeness helps you open up more freely and that can arouse feelings of cheating and guilt if you go elsewhere.” More people commit to a ‘relationship’ with a hairdresser than to another person Besides your partner, no one gets more personal with you than the person treating your tresses. When I first met Olly, he felt like my bestie, counsellor and personal Gok Wan in one. But as with all relationships, you and your hairdresser can begin to want different things. If you cheat, you run the risk of getting caught, as TV presenter Mehreen Baig, 29, from London, learned. “At one appointment, my usual stylist asked what I wanted. I made the dire mistake of jokingly saying: ‘Do what you like,’” Mehreen admits. “It was two days after Victoria Beckham had her famous ‘pob’ cut done and minutes later, my waist-length hair was lying in a pile on the floor. “My hairdresser asked if I liked it and I nodded silently, then cried buckets before going to another salon to have hair extensions. He saw me in the street a few days later and I don’t know who looked more horrified.” But trying out a new hairdresser can sometimes backfire – leaving you to go crawling back to your old stylist Kate Richards, 41, a marketing consultant from Watford, also strayed, but returned to her stylist. “I thought a side fringe would make me look younger, but my stylist said it wouldn’t suit me. “The new hairdresser cut in a fringe that looked as though I’d done it myself. I went back to my old stylist and apologised – luckily he was nice about it.” If you stray, it’s usually best to fess up, according to stylist to the stars Louis Byrne, whose celeb clients include Emma Willis. “A hairdresser can tell if someone else has done your hair,” he says. “If there is a reason why you went elsewhere, apologise, tell them why and give them a chance to try and sort it out.” Going back to an old hairdresser can be harder than leaving them in the first place [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN FABULOUS” posts_category=”30″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] As for me, I realised my new salon wasn’t actually very good. But going back to Olly – which I did a couple of months after our awkward street encounter – was harder than cheating on him in the first place. It was only when I told him I was moving house and would have to leave him for good that a peace treaty was truly brokered between us. He even told my new stylist in London what tints he used to get my shade. And in case you’re wondering, I’ve now been faithful to my current hairdresser, Tee, for four years. [bc_video video_id=”6024055002001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”There’s a new Tangle Teezer hairbrush with shorter teeth designed specifically for people with fine or coloured hair”] Source: *Direct Line For Business