Jordy Nelson

23 May 19
Inside The Star

As the Dallas Cowboys have put together this 2019 team, they have a mix of constants and variables that will hopefully produce a winner. Today, we’re going to look at those x-factors; the players or other circumstances who have a wide range for potential impact. How could these potentially swing the results for this season? […]

23 May 19
The Reviewing Network

What a way to wrap up the AFC, let’s talk about the Oakland Raiders and…once again, they did absolutely nothing of noteworthiness in the regular season last season. Only winning 1 of their first 8 games and then winning 3 of their next 7 to finish 4-12. It was just not a good year for […]

22 May 19
Archy news nety

NEW YORK (AP) – The 131 free agents who signed, with name, position, ex club if different, and contract. The contract information was obtained from The Associated Press from player and management sources. For players with minor league contracts, the letter agreements for the major league contracts are in brackets: BALTIMORE (2) – He signed […]

22 May 19
Paradise Post
ALAMEDA — It happened about midway through the lone practice open to the media at the Raiders four-day organized team activity. Amid the drizzle and cloud cover Tuesday, quarterback Derek Carr produced a rainbow, a perfect pass some 50 yards in the air which dropped into the waiting arms of Tyrell Willliams, who had gotten past the last line of defense. “It’s nice to hit that on the first day, especially just to be able to catch one and get in the end zone,” Williams said. “It’s exciting. Hopefully we’ve got a lot more coming with that.” One deep shot doesn’t mean the Raiders are bringing back the days of Daryle Lamonica to Warren Wells. But there were a few other Carr throws that were probing the last line of defense, including a downfield dime on a wheel route to running back Jalen Richard. Carr was ready for the first query about the deep throw. He’s heard the talk that he’s too conservative and not attack-oriented enough. “Contrary to popular belief, I like throwing it down the field,” Carr said. “We’re pretty good at it here. To be able to do that today — I do that to mess with you guys — we had fun.” For complete Oakland Raiders coverage follow us on Flipboard. Williams, at 6-foot-4, 215 pounds, doesn’t arrive with the publicity or bombast of Antonio Brown, acquired from the Pittsburgh Steelers. Yet he was a significant acquisition, signing for four years and a maximum of $44.3 million as an unrestricted free agent from the Los Angeles Chargers. Over the past three seasons, Williams has been one of the top downfield receivers in the NFL with 153 receptions for 2,440 yards and 16 touchdowns, an average of 15.9 yards per catch. Williams is fast enough to get open deep and big enough to win jump-ball situations against smaller defensive backs. When Carr wants to take a shot downfield, Williams is about as safe as it gets. Tyrell Williams victimizes the Raiders’ David Amerson in 2016. “We like to go down the field and I feel like that’s one of my strong points is stretching the field,” Williams said. “I think that will be big for me to be able to get a lot of coverages that go to A.B (Brown) so I feel like I’ll get a lot of one-on-one coverage down the field. It’ be big for myself.” Gruden’s reputation is that he prefers to pile up the short completions, work the ball down the field. His system should mesh perfectly with Brown, who is adept at run-after-catch routes and hitting seams. In truth, 40 yards is 40 yards — whether it’s a catch-and-run or a pass that sails that distance in the air. And the less time the ball is in the air, the fewer chances for a defender to make a play on the ball. Carr’s career best of 7.3 yards per attempt last season had a lot to do with his 68.9 percent completion percentage, also a career high There was grumbling among the fan base for throwing short of the stake and utilizing check-downs too often. It didn’t help that the Raiders most reliable receiver, Jordy Nelson, had gone from explosive threat to cagey veteran who worked well underneath but whose downfield speed was limited. Gruden’s vision with Brown and Williams is to have the best of both worlds with the ability to turn short throws into big gains and long throws into even bigger ones. “A lot of football today is run-pass options where you stretch the team laterally,” Gruden said. “You’re running bubble screens and fly sweeps, but you also have to stretch them vertically. If you can stretch the field vertically and horizontally, you become a much more difficult offense to defend. That;’s a goal that we have had here as we put together our team.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]NOTES — Erik Swoope, a tight end who played basketball in college at Miami, signed with the Raiders, according to ESPN. Swoope has 23 receptions for 384 yards and four touchdowns for Indianapolis from 2015 to 2018. To make room on the roster, the Raiders released quarterback Landry Jones. That leaves three quarterbacks on the 90-man roster — Carr, Mike Glennon and Nathan Peterman. — Brown, who did not attend the first day of organized team activities on the day of media access, was on the field during the closed session Wednesday. The Raiders posted a photo of Brown at practice on their Twitter feed and Brown did the same on his Instagram account. Like our Oakland Raiders Facebook page for more Raiders news, commentary and conversation.
22 May 19
Red Bluff Daily News
ALAMEDA — It happened about midway through the lone practice open to the media at the Raiders four-day organized team activity. Amid the drizzle and cloud cover Tuesday, quarterback Derek Carr produced a rainbow, a perfect pass some 50 yards in the air which dropped into the waiting arms of Tyrell Willliams, who had gotten past the last line of defense. “It’s nice to hit that on the first day, especially just to be able to catch one and get in the end zone,” Williams said. “It’s exciting. Hopefully we’ve got a lot more coming with that.” One deep shot doesn’t mean the Raiders are bringing back the days of Daryle Lamonica to Warren Wells. But there were a few other Carr throws that were probing the last line of defense, including a downfield dime on a wheel route to running back Jalen Richard. Carr was ready for the first query about the deep throw. He’s heard the talk that he’s too conservative and not attack-oriented enough. “Contrary to popular belief, I like throwing it down the field,” Carr said. “We’re pretty good at it here. To be able to do that today — I do that to mess with you guys — we had fun.” For complete Oakland Raiders coverage follow us on Flipboard. Williams, at 6-foot-4, 215 pounds, doesn’t arrive with the publicity or bombast of Antonio Brown, acquired from the Pittsburgh Steelers. Yet he was a significant acquisition, signing for four years and a maximum of $44.3 million as an unrestricted free agent from the Los Angeles Chargers. Over the past three seasons, Williams has been one of the top downfield receivers in the NFL with 153 receptions for 2,440 yards and 16 touchdowns, an average of 15.9 yards per catch. Williams is fast enough to get open deep and big enough to win jump-ball situations against smaller defensive backs. When Carr wants to take a shot downfield, Williams is about as safe as it gets. Tyrell Williams victimizes the Raiders’ David Amerson in 2016. “We like to go down the field and I feel like that’s one of my strong points is stretching the field,” Williams said. “I think that will be big for me to be able to get a lot of coverages that go to A.B (Brown) so I feel like I’ll get a lot of one-on-one coverage down the field. It’ be big for myself.” Gruden’s reputation is that he prefers to pile up the short completions, work the ball down the field. His system should mesh perfectly with Brown, who is adept at run-after-catch routes and hitting seams. In truth, 40 yards is 40 yards — whether it’s a catch-and-run or a pass that sails that distance in the air. And the less time the ball is in the air, the fewer chances for a defender to make a play on the ball. Carr’s career best of 7.3 yards per attempt last season had a lot to do with his 68.9 percent completion percentage, also a career high There was grumbling among the fan base for throwing short of the stake and utilizing check-downs too often. It didn’t help that the Raiders most reliable receiver, Jordy Nelson, had gone from explosive threat to cagey veteran who worked well underneath but whose downfield speed was limited. Gruden’s vision with Brown and Williams is to have the best of both worlds with the ability to turn short throws into big gains and long throws into even bigger ones. “A lot of football today is run-pass options where you stretch the team laterally,” Gruden said. “You’re running bubble screens and fly sweeps, but you also have to stretch them vertically. If you can stretch the field vertically and horizontally, you become a much more difficult offense to defend. That;’s a goal that we have had here as we put together our team.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]NOTES — Erik Swoope, a tight end who played basketball in college at Miami, signed with the Raiders, according to ESPN. Swoope has 23 receptions for 384 yards and four touchdowns for Indianapolis from 2015 to 2018. To make room on the roster, the Raiders released quarterback Landry Jones. That leaves three quarterbacks on the 90-man roster — Carr, Mike Glennon and Nathan Peterman. — Brown, who did not attend the first day of organized team activities on the day of media access, was on the field during the closed session Wednesday. The Raiders posted a photo of Brown at practice on their Twitter feed and Brown did the same on his Instagram account. Like our Oakland Raiders Facebook page for more Raiders news, commentary and conversation.
22 May 19
The Reporter
ALAMEDA — It happened about midway through the lone practice open to the media at the Raiders four-day organized team activity. Amid the drizzle and cloud cover Tuesday, quarterback Derek Carr produced a rainbow, a perfect pass some 50 yards in the air which dropped into the waiting arms of Tyrell Willliams, who had gotten past the last line of defense. “It’s nice to hit that on the first day, especially just to be able to catch one and get in the end zone,” Williams said. “It’s exciting. Hopefully we’ve got a lot more coming with that.” One deep shot doesn’t mean the Raiders are bringing back the days of Daryle Lamonica to Warren Wells. But there were a few other Carr throws that were probing the last line of defense, including a downfield dime on a wheel route to running back Jalen Richard. Carr was ready for the first query about the deep throw. He’s heard the talk that he’s too conservative and not attack-oriented enough. “Contrary to popular belief, I like throwing it down the field,” Carr said. “We’re pretty good at it here. To be able to do that today — I do that to mess with you guys — we had fun.” For complete Oakland Raiders coverage follow us on Flipboard. Williams, at 6-foot-4, 215 pounds, doesn’t arrive with the publicity or bombast of Antonio Brown, acquired from the Pittsburgh Steelers. Yet he was a significant acquisition, signing for four years and a maximum of $44.3 million as an unrestricted free agent from the Los Angeles Chargers. Over the past three seasons, Williams has been one of the top downfield receivers in the NFL with 153 receptions for 2,440 yards and 16 touchdowns, an average of 15.9 yards per catch. Williams is fast enough to get open deep and big enough to win jump-ball situations against smaller defensive backs. When Carr wants to take a shot downfield, Williams is about as safe as it gets. Tyrell Williams victimizes the Raiders’ David Amerson in 2016. “We like to go down the field and I feel like that’s one of my strong points is stretching the field,” Williams said. “I think that will be big for me to be able to get a lot of coverages that go to A.B (Brown) so I feel like I’ll get a lot of one-on-one coverage down the field. It’ be big for myself.” Gruden’s reputation is that he prefers to pile up the short completions, work the ball down the field. His system should mesh perfectly with Brown, who is adept at run-after-catch routes and hitting seams. In truth, 40 yards is 40 yards — whether it’s a catch-and-run or a pass that sails that distance in the air. And the less time the ball is in the air, the fewer chances for a defender to make a play on the ball. Carr’s career best of 7.3 yards per attempt last season had a lot to do with his 68.9 percent completion percentage, also a career high There was grumbling among the fan base for throwing short of the stake and utilizing check-downs too often. It didn’t help that the Raiders most reliable receiver, Jordy Nelson, had gone from explosive threat to cagey veteran who worked well underneath but whose downfield speed was limited. Gruden’s vision with Brown and Williams is to have the best of both worlds with the ability to turn short throws into big gains and long throws into even bigger ones. “A lot of football today is run-pass options where you stretch the team laterally,” Gruden said. “You’re running bubble screens and fly sweeps, but you also have to stretch them vertically. If you can stretch the field vertically and horizontally, you become a much more difficult offense to defend. That;’s a goal that we have had here as we put together our team.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]NOTES — Erik Swoope, a tight end who played basketball in college at Miami, signed with the Raiders, according to ESPN. Swoope has 23 receptions for 384 yards and four touchdowns for Indianapolis from 2015 to 2018. To make room on the roster, the Raiders released quarterback Landry Jones. That leaves three quarterbacks on the 90-man roster — Carr, Mike Glennon and Nathan Peterman. — Brown, who did not attend the first day of organized team activities on the day of media access, was on the field during the closed session Wednesday. The Raiders posted a photo of Brown at practice on their Twitter feed and Brown did the same on his Instagram account. Like our Oakland Raiders Facebook page for more Raiders news, commentary and conversation.
22 May 19
Times-Standard
ALAMEDA — It happened about midway through the lone practice open to the media at the Raiders four-day organized team activity. Amid the drizzle and cloud cover Tuesday, quarterback Derek Carr produced a rainbow, a perfect pass some 50 yards in the air which dropped into the waiting arms of Tyrell Willliams, who had gotten past the last line of defense. “It’s nice to hit that on the first day, especially just to be able to catch one and get in the end zone,” Williams said. “It’s exciting. Hopefully we’ve got a lot more coming with that.” One deep shot doesn’t mean the Raiders are bringing back the days of Daryle Lamonica to Warren Wells. But there were a few other Carr throws that were probing the last line of defense, including a downfield dime on a wheel route to running back Jalen Richard. Carr was ready for the first query about the deep throw. He’s heard the talk that he’s too conservative and not attack-oriented enough. “Contrary to popular belief, I like throwing it down the field,” Carr said. “We’re pretty good at it here. To be able to do that today — I do that to mess with you guys — we had fun.” For complete Oakland Raiders coverage follow us on Flipboard. Williams, at 6-foot-4, 215 pounds, doesn’t arrive with the publicity or bombast of Antonio Brown, acquired from the Pittsburgh Steelers. Yet he was a significant acquisition, signing for four years and a maximum of $44.3 million as an unrestricted free agent from the Los Angeles Chargers. Over the past three seasons, Williams has been one of the top downfield receivers in the NFL with 153 receptions for 2,440 yards and 16 touchdowns, an average of 15.9 yards per catch. Williams is fast enough to get open deep and big enough to win jump-ball situations against smaller defensive backs. When Carr wants to take a shot downfield, Williams is about as safe as it gets. Tyrell Williams victimizes the Raiders’ David Amerson in 2016. “We like to go down the field and I feel like that’s one of my strong points is stretching the field,” Williams said. “I think that will be big for me to be able to get a lot of coverages that go to A.B (Brown) so I feel like I’ll get a lot of one-on-one coverage down the field. It’ be big for myself.” Gruden’s reputation is that he prefers to pile up the short completions, work the ball down the field. His system should mesh perfectly with Brown, who is adept at run-after-catch routes and hitting seams. In truth, 40 yards is 40 yards — whether it’s a catch-and-run or a pass that sails that distance in the air. And the less time the ball is in the air, the fewer chances for a defender to make a play on the ball. Carr’s career best of 7.3 yards per attempt last season had a lot to do with his 68.9 percent completion percentage, also a career high There was grumbling among the fan base for throwing short of the stake and utilizing check-downs too often. It didn’t help that the Raiders most reliable receiver, Jordy Nelson, had gone from explosive threat to cagey veteran who worked well underneath but whose downfield speed was limited. Gruden’s vision with Brown and Williams is to have the best of both worlds with the ability to turn short throws into big gains and long throws into even bigger ones. “A lot of football today is run-pass options where you stretch the team laterally,” Gruden said. “You’re running bubble screens and fly sweeps, but you also have to stretch them vertically. If you can stretch the field vertically and horizontally, you become a much more difficult offense to defend. That;’s a goal that we have had here as we put together our team.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]NOTES — Erik Swoope, a tight end who played basketball in college at Miami, signed with the Raiders, according to ESPN. Swoope has 23 receptions for 384 yards and four touchdowns for Indianapolis from 2015 to 2018. To make room on the roster, the Raiders released quarterback Landry Jones. That leaves three quarterbacks on the 90-man roster — Carr, Mike Glennon and Nathan Peterman. — Brown, who did not attend the first day of organized team activities on the day of media access, was on the field during the closed session Wednesday. The Raiders posted a photo of Brown at practice on their Twitter feed and Brown did the same on his Instagram account. Like our Oakland Raiders Facebook page for more Raiders news, commentary and conversation.
22 May 19
Redwood Times
ALAMEDA — It happened about midway through the lone practice open to the media at the Raiders four-day organized team activity. Amid the drizzle and cloud cover Tuesday, quarterback Derek Carr produced a rainbow, a perfect pass some 50 yards in the air which dropped into the waiting arms of Tyrell Willliams, who had gotten past the last line of defense. “It’s nice to hit that on the first day, especially just to be able to catch one and get in the end zone,” Williams said. “It’s exciting. Hopefully we’ve got a lot more coming with that.” One deep shot doesn’t mean the Raiders are bringing back the days of Daryle Lamonica to Warren Wells. But there were a few other Carr throws that were probing the last line of defense, including a downfield dime on a wheel route to running back Jalen Richard. Carr was ready for the first query about the deep throw. He’s heard the talk that he’s too conservative and not attack-oriented enough. “Contrary to popular belief, I like throwing it down the field,” Carr said. “We’re pretty good at it here. To be able to do that today — I do that to mess with you guys — we had fun.” For complete Oakland Raiders coverage follow us on Flipboard. Williams, at 6-foot-4, 215 pounds, doesn’t arrive with the publicity or bombast of Antonio Brown, acquired from the Pittsburgh Steelers. Yet he was a significant acquisition, signing for four years and a maximum of $44.3 million as an unrestricted free agent from the Los Angeles Chargers. Over the past three seasons, Williams has been one of the top downfield receivers in the NFL with 153 receptions for 2,440 yards and 16 touchdowns, an average of 15.9 yards per catch. Williams is fast enough to get open deep and big enough to win jump-ball situations against smaller defensive backs. When Carr wants to take a shot downfield, Williams is about as safe as it gets. Tyrell Williams victimizes the Raiders’ David Amerson in 2016. “We like to go down the field and I feel like that’s one of my strong points is stretching the field,” Williams said. “I think that will be big for me to be able to get a lot of coverages that go to A.B (Brown) so I feel like I’ll get a lot of one-on-one coverage down the field. It’ be big for myself.” Gruden’s reputation is that he prefers to pile up the short completions, work the ball down the field. His system should mesh perfectly with Brown, who is adept at run-after-catch routes and hitting seams. In truth, 40 yards is 40 yards — whether it’s a catch-and-run or a pass that sails that distance in the air. And the less time the ball is in the air, the fewer chances for a defender to make a play on the ball. Carr’s career best of 7.3 yards per attempt last season had a lot to do with his 68.9 percent completion percentage, also a career high There was grumbling among the fan base for throwing short of the stake and utilizing check-downs too often. It didn’t help that the Raiders most reliable receiver, Jordy Nelson, had gone from explosive threat to cagey veteran who worked well underneath but whose downfield speed was limited. Gruden’s vision with Brown and Williams is to have the best of both worlds with the ability to turn short throws into big gains and long throws into even bigger ones. “A lot of football today is run-pass options where you stretch the team laterally,” Gruden said. “You’re running bubble screens and fly sweeps, but you also have to stretch them vertically. If you can stretch the field vertically and horizontally, you become a much more difficult offense to defend. That;’s a goal that we have had here as we put together our team.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]NOTES — Erik Swoope, a tight end who played basketball in college at Miami, signed with the Raiders, according to ESPN. Swoope has 23 receptions for 384 yards and four touchdowns for Indianapolis from 2015 to 2018. To make room on the roster, the Raiders released quarterback Landry Jones. That leaves three quarterbacks on the 90-man roster — Carr, Mike Glennon and Nathan Peterman. — Brown, who did not attend the first day of organized team activities on the day of media access, was on the field during the closed session Wednesday. The Raiders posted a photo of Brown at practice on their Twitter feed and Brown did the same on his Instagram account. Like our Oakland Raiders Facebook page for more Raiders news, commentary and conversation.
22 May 19
Chico Enterprise-Record
ALAMEDA — It happened about midway through the lone practice open to the media at the Raiders four-day organized team activity. Amid the drizzle and cloud cover Tuesday, quarterback Derek Carr produced a rainbow, a perfect pass some 50 yards in the air which dropped into the waiting arms of Tyrell Willliams, who had gotten past the last line of defense. “It’s nice to hit that on the first day, especially just to be able to catch one and get in the end zone,” Williams said. “It’s exciting. Hopefully we’ve got a lot more coming with that.” One deep shot doesn’t mean the Raiders are bringing back the days of Daryle Lamonica to Warren Wells. But there were a few other Carr throws that were probing the last line of defense, including a downfield dime on a wheel route to running back Jalen Richard. Carr was ready for the first query about the deep throw. He’s heard the talk that he’s too conservative and not attack-oriented enough. “Contrary to popular belief, I like throwing it down the field,” Carr said. “We’re pretty good at it here. To be able to do that today — I do that to mess with you guys — we had fun.” For complete Oakland Raiders coverage follow us on Flipboard. Williams, at 6-foot-4, 215 pounds, doesn’t arrive with the publicity or bombast of Antonio Brown, acquired from the Pittsburgh Steelers. Yet he was a significant acquisition, signing for four years and a maximum of $44.3 million as an unrestricted free agent from the Los Angeles Chargers. Over the past three seasons, Williams has been one of the top downfield receivers in the NFL with 153 receptions for 2,440 yards and 16 touchdowns, an average of 15.9 yards per catch. Williams is fast enough to get open deep and big enough to win jump-ball situations against smaller defensive backs. When Carr wants to take a shot downfield, Williams is about as safe as it gets. Tyrell Williams victimizes the Raiders’ David Amerson in 2016. “We like to go down the field and I feel like that’s one of my strong points is stretching the field,” Williams said. “I think that will be big for me to be able to get a lot of coverages that go to A.B (Brown) so I feel like I’ll get a lot of one-on-one coverage down the field. It’ be big for myself.” Gruden’s reputation is that he prefers to pile up the short completions, work the ball down the field. His system should mesh perfectly with Brown, who is adept at run-after-catch routes and hitting seams. In truth, 40 yards is 40 yards — whether it’s a catch-and-run or a pass that sails that distance in the air. And the less time the ball is in the air, the fewer chances for a defender to make a play on the ball. Carr’s career best of 7.3 yards per attempt last season had a lot to do with his 68.9 percent completion percentage, also a career high There was grumbling among the fan base for throwing short of the stake and utilizing check-downs too often. It didn’t help that the Raiders most reliable receiver, Jordy Nelson, had gone from explosive threat to cagey veteran who worked well underneath but whose downfield speed was limited. Gruden’s vision with Brown and Williams is to have the best of both worlds with the ability to turn short throws into big gains and long throws into even bigger ones. “A lot of football today is run-pass options where you stretch the team laterally,” Gruden said. “You’re running bubble screens and fly sweeps, but you also have to stretch them vertically. If you can stretch the field vertically and horizontally, you become a much more difficult offense to defend. That;’s a goal that we have had here as we put together our team.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]NOTES — Erik Swoope, a tight end who played basketball in college at Miami, signed with the Raiders, according to ESPN. Swoope has 23 receptions for 384 yards and four touchdowns for Indianapolis from 2015 to 2018. To make room on the roster, the Raiders released quarterback Landry Jones. That leaves three quarterbacks on the 90-man roster — Carr, Mike Glennon and Nathan Peterman. — Brown, who did not attend the first day of organized team activities on the day of media access, was on the field during the closed session Wednesday. The Raiders posted a photo of Brown at practice on their Twitter feed and Brown did the same on his Instagram account. Like our Oakland Raiders Facebook page for more Raiders news, commentary and conversation.
22 May 19
Oroville Mercury-Register
ALAMEDA — It happened about midway through the lone practice open to the media at the Raiders four-day organized team activity. Amid the drizzle and cloud cover Tuesday, quarterback Derek Carr produced a rainbow, a perfect pass some 50 yards in the air which dropped into the waiting arms of Tyrell Willliams, who had gotten past the last line of defense. “It’s nice to hit that on the first day, especially just to be able to catch one and get in the end zone,” Williams said. “It’s exciting. Hopefully we’ve got a lot more coming with that.” One deep shot doesn’t mean the Raiders are bringing back the days of Daryle Lamonica to Warren Wells. But there were a few other Carr throws that were probing the last line of defense, including a downfield dime on a wheel route to running back Jalen Richard. Carr was ready for the first query about the deep throw. He’s heard the talk that he’s too conservative and not attack-oriented enough. “Contrary to popular belief, I like throwing it down the field,” Carr said. “We’re pretty good at it here. To be able to do that today — I do that to mess with you guys — we had fun.” For complete Oakland Raiders coverage follow us on Flipboard. Williams, at 6-foot-4, 215 pounds, doesn’t arrive with the publicity or bombast of Antonio Brown, acquired from the Pittsburgh Steelers. Yet he was a significant acquisition, signing for four years and a maximum of $44.3 million as an unrestricted free agent from the Los Angeles Chargers. Over the past three seasons, Williams has been one of the top downfield receivers in the NFL with 153 receptions for 2,440 yards and 16 touchdowns, an average of 15.9 yards per catch. Williams is fast enough to get open deep and big enough to win jump-ball situations against smaller defensive backs. When Carr wants to take a shot downfield, Williams is about as safe as it gets. Tyrell Williams victimizes the Raiders’ David Amerson in 2016. “We like to go down the field and I feel like that’s one of my strong points is stretching the field,” Williams said. “I think that will be big for me to be able to get a lot of coverages that go to A.B (Brown) so I feel like I’ll get a lot of one-on-one coverage down the field. It’ be big for myself.” Gruden’s reputation is that he prefers to pile up the short completions, work the ball down the field. His system should mesh perfectly with Brown, who is adept at run-after-catch routes and hitting seams. In truth, 40 yards is 40 yards — whether it’s a catch-and-run or a pass that sails that distance in the air. And the less time the ball is in the air, the fewer chances for a defender to make a play on the ball. Carr’s career best of 7.3 yards per attempt last season had a lot to do with his 68.9 percent completion percentage, also a career high There was grumbling among the fan base for throwing short of the stake and utilizing check-downs too often. It didn’t help that the Raiders most reliable receiver, Jordy Nelson, had gone from explosive threat to cagey veteran who worked well underneath but whose downfield speed was limited. Gruden’s vision with Brown and Williams is to have the best of both worlds with the ability to turn short throws into big gains and long throws into even bigger ones. “A lot of football today is run-pass options where you stretch the team laterally,” Gruden said. “You’re running bubble screens and fly sweeps, but you also have to stretch them vertically. If you can stretch the field vertically and horizontally, you become a much more difficult offense to defend. That;’s a goal that we have had here as we put together our team.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]NOTES — Erik Swoope, a tight end who played basketball in college at Miami, signed with the Raiders, according to ESPN. Swoope has 23 receptions for 384 yards and four touchdowns for Indianapolis from 2015 to 2018. To make room on the roster, the Raiders released quarterback Landry Jones. That leaves three quarterbacks on the 90-man roster — Carr, Mike Glennon and Nathan Peterman. — Brown, who did not attend the first day of organized team activities on the day of media access, was on the field during the closed session Wednesday. The Raiders posted a photo of Brown at practice on their Twitter feed and Brown did the same on his Instagram account. Like our Oakland Raiders Facebook page for more Raiders news, commentary and conversation.
22 May 19
Daily Democrat
ALAMEDA — It happened about midway through the lone practice open to the media at the Raiders four-day organized team activity. Amid the drizzle and cloud cover Tuesday, quarterback Derek Carr produced a rainbow, a perfect pass some 50 yards in the air which dropped into the waiting arms of Tyrell Willliams, who had gotten past the last line of defense. “It’s nice to hit that on the first day, especially just to be able to catch one and get in the end zone,” Williams said. “It’s exciting. Hopefully we’ve got a lot more coming with that.” One deep shot doesn’t mean the Raiders are bringing back the days of Daryle Lamonica to Warren Wells. But there were a few other Carr throws that were probing the last line of defense, including a downfield dime on a wheel route to running back Jalen Richard. Carr was ready for the first query about the deep throw. He’s heard the talk that he’s too conservative and not attack-oriented enough. “Contrary to popular belief, I like throwing it down the field,” Carr said. “We’re pretty good at it here. To be able to do that today — I do that to mess with you guys — we had fun.” For complete Oakland Raiders coverage follow us on Flipboard. Williams, at 6-foot-4, 215 pounds, doesn’t arrive with the publicity or bombast of Antonio Brown, acquired from the Pittsburgh Steelers. Yet he was a significant acquisition, signing for four years and a maximum of $44.3 million as an unrestricted free agent from the Los Angeles Chargers. Over the past three seasons, Williams has been one of the top downfield receivers in the NFL with 153 receptions for 2,440 yards and 16 touchdowns, an average of 15.9 yards per catch. Williams is fast enough to get open deep and big enough to win jump-ball situations against smaller defensive backs. When Carr wants to take a shot downfield, Williams is about as safe as it gets. Tyrell Williams victimizes the Raiders’ David Amerson in 2016. “We like to go down the field and I feel like that’s one of my strong points is stretching the field,” Williams said. “I think that will be big for me to be able to get a lot of coverages that go to A.B (Brown) so I feel like I’ll get a lot of one-on-one coverage down the field. It’ be big for myself.” Gruden’s reputation is that he prefers to pile up the short completions, work the ball down the field. His system should mesh perfectly with Brown, who is adept at run-after-catch routes and hitting seams. In truth, 40 yards is 40 yards — whether it’s a catch-and-run or a pass that sails that distance in the air. And the less time the ball is in the air, the fewer chances for a defender to make a play on the ball. Carr’s career best of 7.3 yards per attempt last season had a lot to do with his 68.9 percent completion percentage, also a career high There was grumbling among the fan base for throwing short of the stake and utilizing check-downs too often. It didn’t help that the Raiders most reliable receiver, Jordy Nelson, had gone from explosive threat to cagey veteran who worked well underneath but whose downfield speed was limited. Gruden’s vision with Brown and Williams is to have the best of both worlds with the ability to turn short throws into big gains and long throws into even bigger ones. “A lot of football today is run-pass options where you stretch the team laterally,” Gruden said. “You’re running bubble screens and fly sweeps, but you also have to stretch them vertically. If you can stretch the field vertically and horizontally, you become a much more difficult offense to defend. That;’s a goal that we have had here as we put together our team.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]NOTES — Erik Swoope, a tight end who played basketball in college at Miami, signed with the Raiders, according to ESPN. Swoope has 23 receptions for 384 yards and four touchdowns for Indianapolis from 2015 to 2018. To make room on the roster, the Raiders released quarterback Landry Jones. That leaves three quarterbacks on the 90-man roster — Carr, Mike Glennon and Nathan Peterman. — Brown, who did not attend the first day of organized team activities on the day of media access, was on the field during the closed session Wednesday. The Raiders posted a photo of Brown at practice on their Twitter feed and Brown did the same on his Instagram account. Like our Oakland Raiders Facebook page for more Raiders news, commentary and conversation.
22 May 19
Santa Cruz Sentinel
ALAMEDA — It happened about midway through the lone practice open to the media at the Raiders four-day organized team activity. Amid the drizzle and cloud cover Tuesday, quarterback Derek Carr produced a rainbow, a perfect pass some 50 yards in the air which dropped into the waiting arms of Tyrell Willliams, who had gotten past the last line of defense. “It’s nice to hit that on the first day, especially just to be able to catch one and get in the end zone,” Williams said. “It’s exciting. Hopefully we’ve got a lot more coming with that.” One deep shot doesn’t mean the Raiders are bringing back the days of Daryle Lamonica to Warren Wells. But there were a few other Carr throws that were probing the last line of defense, including a downfield dime on a wheel route to running back Jalen Richard. Carr was ready for the first query about the deep throw. He’s heard the talk that he’s too conservative and not attack-oriented enough. “Contrary to popular belief, I like throwing it down the field,” Carr said. “We’re pretty good at it here. To be able to do that today — I do that to mess with you guys — we had fun.” For complete Oakland Raiders coverage follow us on Flipboard. Williams, at 6-foot-4, 215 pounds, doesn’t arrive with the publicity or bombast of Antonio Brown, acquired from the Pittsburgh Steelers. Yet he was a significant acquisition, signing for four years and a maximum of $44.3 million as an unrestricted free agent from the Los Angeles Chargers. Over the past three seasons, Williams has been one of the top downfield receivers in the NFL with 153 receptions for 2,440 yards and 16 touchdowns, an average of 15.9 yards per catch. Williams is fast enough to get open deep and big enough to win jump-ball situations against smaller defensive backs. When Carr wants to take a shot downfield, Williams is about as safe as it gets. Tyrell Williams victimizes the Raiders’ David Amerson in 2016. “We like to go down the field and I feel like that’s one of my strong points is stretching the field,” Williams said. “I think that will be big for me to be able to get a lot of coverages that go to A.B (Brown) so I feel like I’ll get a lot of one-on-one coverage down the field. It’ be big for myself.” Gruden’s reputation is that he prefers to pile up the short completions, work the ball down the field. His system should mesh perfectly with Brown, who is adept at run-after-catch routes and hitting seams. In truth, 40 yards is 40 yards — whether it’s a catch-and-run or a pass that sails that distance in the air. And the less time the ball is in the air, the fewer chances for a defender to make a play on the ball. Carr’s career best of 7.3 yards per attempt last season had a lot to do with his 68.9 percent completion percentage, also a career high There was grumbling among the fan base for throwing short of the stake and utilizing check-downs too often. It didn’t help that the Raiders most reliable receiver, Jordy Nelson, had gone from explosive threat to cagey veteran who worked well underneath but whose downfield speed was limited. Gruden’s vision with Brown and Williams is to have the best of both worlds with the ability to turn short throws into big gains and long throws into even bigger ones. “A lot of football today is run-pass options where you stretch the team laterally,” Gruden said. “You’re running bubble screens and fly sweeps, but you also have to stretch them vertically. If you can stretch the field vertically and horizontally, you become a much more difficult offense to defend. That;’s a goal that we have had here as we put together our team.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]NOTES — Erik Swoope, a tight end who played basketball in college at Miami, signed with the Raiders, according to ESPN. Swoope has 23 receptions for 384 yards and four touchdowns for Indianapolis from 2015 to 2018. To make room on the roster, the Raiders released quarterback Landry Jones. That leaves three quarterbacks on the 90-man roster — Carr, Mike Glennon and Nathan Peterman. — Brown, who did not attend the first day of organized team activities on the day of media access, was on the field during the closed session Wednesday. The Raiders posted a photo of Brown at practice on their Twitter feed and Brown did the same on his Instagram account. Like our Oakland Raiders Facebook page for more Raiders news, commentary and conversation.
22 May 19
East Bay Times
ALAMEDA — It happened about midway through the lone practice open to the media at the Raiders four-day organized team activity. Amid the drizzle and cloud cover Tuesday, quarterback Derek Carr produced a rainbow, a perfect pass some 50 yards in the air which dropped into the waiting arms of Tyrell Willliams, who had gotten past the last line of defense. “It’s nice to hit that on the first day, especially just to be able to catch one and get in the end zone,” Williams said. “It’s exciting. Hopefully we’ve got a lot more coming with that.” One deep shot doesn’t mean the Raiders are bringing back the days of Daryle Lamonica to Warren Wells. But there were a few other Carr throws that were probing the last line of defense, including a downfield dime on a wheel route to running back Jalen Richard. Carr was ready for the first query about the deep throw. He’s heard the talk that he’s too conservative and not attack-oriented enough. “Contrary to popular belief, I like throwing it down the field,” Carr said. “We’re pretty good at it here. To be able to do that today — I do that to mess with you guys — we had fun.” For complete Oakland Raiders coverage follow us on Flipboard. Williams, at 6-foot-4, 215 pounds, doesn’t arrive with the publicity or bombast of Antonio Brown, acquired from the Pittsburgh Steelers. Yet he was a significant acquisition, signing for four years and a maximum of $44.3 million as an unrestricted free agent from the Los Angeles Chargers. Over the past three seasons, Williams has been one of the top downfield receivers in the NFL with 153 receptions for 2,440 yards and 16 touchdowns, an average of 15.9 yards per catch. Williams is fast enough to get open deep and big enough to win jump-ball situations against smaller defensive backs. When Carr wants to take a shot downfield, Williams is about as safe as it gets. Tyrell Williams victimizes the Raiders’ David Amerson in 2016. “We like to go down the field and I feel like that’s one of my strong points is stretching the field,” Williams said. “I think that will be big for me to be able to get a lot of coverages that go to A.B (Brown) so I feel like I’ll get a lot of one-on-one coverage down the field. It’ be big for myself.” Gruden’s reputation is that he prefers to pile up the short completions, work the ball down the field. His system should mesh perfectly with Brown, who is adept at run-after-catch routes and hitting seams. In truth, 40 yards is 40 yards — whether it’s a catch-and-run or a pass that sails that distance in the air. And the less time the ball is in the air, the fewer chances for a defender to make a play on the ball. Carr’s career best of 7.3 yards per attempt last season had a lot to do with his 68.9 percent completion percentage, also a career high There was grumbling among the fan base for throwing short of the stake and utilizing check-downs too often. It didn’t help that the Raiders most reliable receiver, Jordy Nelson, had gone from explosive threat to cagey veteran who worked well underneath but whose downfield speed was limited. Gruden’s vision with Brown and Williams is to have the best of both worlds with the ability to turn short throws into big gains and long throws into even bigger ones. “A lot of football today is run-pass options where you stretch the team laterally,” Gruden said. “You’re running bubble screens and fly sweeps, but you also have to stretch them vertically. If you can stretch the field vertically and horizontally, you become a much more difficult offense to defend. That;’s a goal that we have had here as we put together our team.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]NOTES — Erik Swoope, a tight end who played basketball in college at Miami, signed with the Raiders, according to ESPN. Swoope has 23 receptions for 384 yards and four touchdowns for Indianapolis from 2015 to 2018. To make room on the roster, the Raiders released quarterback Landry Jones. That leaves three quarterbacks on the 90-man roster — Carr, Mike Glennon and Nathan Peterman. — Brown, who did not attend the first day of organized team activities on the day of media access, was on the field during the closed session Wednesday. The Raiders posted a photo of Brown at practice on their Twitter feed and Brown did the same on his Instagram account. Like our Oakland Raiders Facebook page for more Raiders news, commentary and conversation.
22 May 19
The Mercury News
ALAMEDA — It happened about midway through the lone practice open to the media at the Raiders four-day organized team activity. Amid the drizzle and cloud cover Tuesday, quarterback Derek Carr produced a rainbow, a perfect pass some 50 yards in the air which dropped into the waiting arms of Tyrell Willliams, who had gotten past the last line of defense. “It’s nice to hit that on the first day, especially just to be able to catch one and get in the end zone,” Williams said. “It’s exciting. Hopefully we’ve got a lot more coming with that.” One deep shot doesn’t mean the Raiders are bringing back the days of Daryle Lamonica to Warren Wells. But there were a few other Carr throws that were probing the last line of defense, including a downfield dime on a wheel route to running back Jalen Richard. Carr was ready for the first query about the deep throw. He’s heard the talk that he’s too conservative and not attack-oriented enough. “Contrary to popular belief, I like throwing it down the field,” Carr said. “We’re pretty good at it here. To be able to do that today — I do that to mess with you guys — we had fun.” For complete Oakland Raiders coverage follow us on Flipboard. Williams, at 6-foot-4, 215 pounds, doesn’t arrive with the publicity or bombast of Antonio Brown, acquired from the Pittsburgh Steelers. Yet he was a significant acquisition, signing for four years and a maximum of $44.3 million as an unrestricted free agent from the Los Angeles Chargers. Over the past three seasons, Williams has been one of the top downfield receivers in the NFL with 153 receptions for 2,440 yards and 16 touchdowns, an average of 15.9 yards per catch. Williams is fast enough to get open deep and big enough to win jump-ball situations against smaller defensive backs. When Carr wants to take a shot downfield, Williams is about as safe as it gets. Tyrell Williams victimizes the Raiders’ David Amerson in 2016. “We like to go down the field and I feel like that’s one of my strong points is stretching the field,” Williams said. “I think that will be big for me to be able to get a lot of coverages that go to A.B (Brown) so I feel like I’ll get a lot of one-on-one coverage down the field. It’ be big for myself.” Gruden’s reputation is that he prefers to pile up the short completions, work the ball down the field. His system should mesh perfectly with Brown, who is adept at run-after-catch routes and hitting seams. In truth, 40 yards is 40 yards — whether it’s a catch-and-run or a pass that sails that distance in the air. And the less time the ball is in the air, the fewer chances for a defender to make a play on the ball. Carr’s career best of 7.3 yards per attempt last season had a lot to do with his 68.9 percent completion percentage, also a career high There was grumbling among the fan base for throwing short of the stake and utilizing check-downs too often. It didn’t help that the Raiders most reliable receiver, Jordy Nelson, had gone from explosive threat to cagey veteran who worked well underneath but whose downfield speed was limited. Gruden’s vision with Brown and Williams is to have the best of both worlds with the ability to turn short throws into big gains and long throws into even bigger ones. “A lot of football today is run-pass options where you stretch the team laterally,” Gruden said. “You’re running bubble screens and fly sweeps, but you also have to stretch them vertically. If you can stretch the field vertically and horizontally, you become a much more difficult offense to defend. That;’s a goal that we have had here as we put together our team.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]NOTES — Erik Swoope, a tight end who played basketball in college at Miami, signed with the Raiders, according to ESPN. Swoope has 23 receptions for 384 yards and four touchdowns for Indianapolis from 2015 to 2018. To make room on the roster, the Raiders released quarterback Landry Jones. That leaves three quarterbacks on the 90-man roster — Carr, Mike Glennon and Nathan Peterman. — Brown, who did not attend the first day of organized team activities on the day of media access, was on the field during the closed session Wednesday. The Raiders posted a photo of Brown at practice on their Twitter feed and Brown did the same on his Instagram account. Like our Oakland Raiders Facebook page for more Raiders news, commentary and conversation.
22 May 19
Sconnie Sports Talk

After two consecutive seasons without January football, Packer fans are getting anxious. But there is hope as we usher in a new era of coaching and players in preparation for Aaron Rodgers’ last few go-arounds. The defense has improved both through the draft and free agency, and the offense is looking to start the season […]

22 May 19
Las Vegas Review-Journal
#gallery-1669588-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1669588-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1669588-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1669588-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Oakland Raiders general manager Mike Mayock, left, and head coach Jon Gruden watch the team practice during an offseason training session at the team’s headquarters in Alameda, Calif., Tuesday, May 21, 2019. (Heidi Fang /Las Vegas Review-Journal) @HeidiFang Oakland Raiders quarterback Derek Carr, right, hands off the football to running back Doug Martin during an offseason training session at the team’s headquarters in Alameda, Calif., Tuesday, May 21, 2019. (Heidi Fang /Las Vegas Review-Journal) @HeidiFang Oakland Raiders head coach Jon Gruden listens to media questions after an offseason training session at the team’s headquarters in Alameda, Calif., Tuesday, May 21, 2019. (Heidi Fang /Las Vegas Review-Journal) @HeidiFang Oakland Raiders quarterback Derek Carr (4) throws a pass during an official team activity, Tuesday, May 21, 2019 at the NFL football team’s headquarters in Alameda, Calif. (AP Photo/D. Ross Cameron) Oakland Raiders quarterback Derek Carr (4) throws a pass during an official team activity, Tuesday, May 21, 2019 at the NFL football team’s headquarters in Alameda, Calif. (AP Photo/D. Ross Cameron) Oakland Raiders quarterback Derek Carr prepares to throw the football during an offseason training session at the team’s headquarters in Alameda, Calif., Tuesday, May 21, 2019. (Heidi Fang /Las Vegas Review-Journal) @HeidiFang ALAMEDA, Calif. — On the first day that Raiders wide receivers could be covered, Derek Carr peered downfield and saw that Tyrell Williams wasn’t. He stepped into the pocket during a 7-on-7 period and hurled a 55-yard pass to Williams in stride. Touchdown. And a little proof that a missing dynamic to the offense may be found. Perhaps no position on the Raiders’ roster is more improved on paper than wide receiver. For the parchment to translate, Carr and recent additions like Williams look to develop their on-field chemistry. Tuesday’s start of organized team activities marked an important benchmark in their effort. As outlined in the NFL’s collective bargaining agreement, OTAs are the first time players are permitted to wear helmets during the offseason workout program, and it’s the first time that offensive and defensive players can directly oppose each other in drills. Or try. On the long score, Williams had multiple steps on the nearest safety. “It’s nice to hit that on the first day, especially to catch one and get in the end zone,” Williams said. “It’s exciting. Hopefully, we’ve got a lot more coming with that.” There are a lot of new faces for Carr. Amari Cooper is gone. Jordy Nelson is gone. Jared Cook is gone. Seth Roberts, Martavis Bryant, Brandon LaFell and Lee Smith are all gone. With the exception of LaFell, those players were on this same field last May. And although Smith was more of a blocker, all seven contribute to the same staggering turnover. Carr completed 274 passes for 3,227 yards and 19 touchdowns to his wide receivers and tight ends in 2018. Only 35 passes for 344 yards and two touchdowns were to wide receivers and tight ends still on the roster today. Tight ends Darren Waller and Derek Carrier and wide receivers Marcell Ateman, Dwayne Harris and Keon Hatcher are the lone returners. “It’s crazy what 12 months does, right?” Carr said Tuesday. “A whole new group. A new challenge of getting on the same page and things like that. But one thing I’ve seen with this new group is they work crazy hard. A lot of people say they do, but these guys, they’re texting me, saying, ‘Hey, I’m in town. Let’s go.’ I’ll get off my couch. I’ll bring my kids, and we’ll go throw. “It’s nice to see how hard they want to work and how great they want to be. … I’ll hit them up and say, ‘I’m going to be in town. Do you want to throw this day, this day,’ and they’ll be like, ‘Yeah, I’ll be there,’ and they’re literally taking flights the next day. It means something to them.” Antonio Brown was the Raiders’ blockbuster addition. He has shown initiative to work out and mingle with Carr away from Raiders headquarters, helping not only to build their chemistry but establish a tone for committing to the jelling process. Brown was absent Tuesday for unspecified reasons, something coach Jon Gruden cautioned not to “read much into.” Brown and Williams officially arrived March 13. In the several weeks that followed, the Raiders added Ryan Grant and J.J. Nelson as free agents, traded up to draft former Clemson slot receiver Hunter Renfrow in the fifth round, and invested substantial guaranteed money to sign undrafted rookie free agent Keelan Doss. Of them all, the 6-foot-4-inch Williams offers the most ability to stretch the field vertically. Carr has lacked a proper deep threat. Johnny Holton was his speediest wide receiver in 2017, but he had the ball skills of a cornerback. To that end, the Raiders tried in vain to convert him into a cornerback on their practice squad last year before parting ways. Bryant was hoped to solve the riddle in 2019, but his limited grasp of the playbook served to his detriment. Williams could be the Raiders’ answer. He flashed that Tuesday. “A lot of football today is run-pass options where you stretch the (defense) laterally,” Gruden said. “You’re running bubble screens and fly sweeps, but you’ve also got to stretch them vertically. If you can stretch them vertically and horizontally, you become a much more difficult offense to defend. That’s a goal we’ve had here as we put together our team.” More Raiders: Follow at reviewjournal.com/Raiders and @NFLinVegas on Twitter. Contact reporter Michael Gehlken at mgehlken@reviewjournal.com. Follow @GehlkenNFL on Twitter.
21 May 19
IQ

The most reverentially treated by revisionist history, Lennon admittedly beat any woman foolish enough to get close to him and infamously subjected his son Julian to the vilest verbal abuse, but committed far greater cultural atrocities. A second rate pop hack whose mind numbingly dull doggerel effectively hobbled rock ‘n’ roll, Lennon’s destructive, simple minded […]