Rob Lowe

15 Jun 19
The Scottish Sun
Actor Rob Lowe joked that Prince William’s hair loss was a “traumatic experience”, but is it really such a big deal? Two men talk about the true impact of losing their locks. Men can lose their hair at anytime throughout their life and it is difficult to know what to do when it starts to happen ‘I felt so self-conscious I stopped going out’ Social club manager Michael Whitaker, 32, is single and lives in Leeds. “At a friend’s wedding last November, pictures from the stag do were plastered all over the gents’ loos. Michael before he embarked on the hair transplant process As people scrutinised them, they kept asking where I was in the photos. But they didn’t recognise me as the bald bloke at the back, thanks to my £6,000 hair transplant. As a kid, my hair was thick and grew quickly. I kept it short until I was about 21, then grew it long to fit in with my indie mates. It wasn’t until I decided to get it all chopped off again at 25 that I realised it had been hiding my horrifically receding hairline. I remember staring in the barber’s mirror, wondering how I hadn’t noticed that I had two big bald patches at the front of my scalp. I felt the panic rise. I was only in my mid-20s and was clearly going bald. It didn’t help that both my 31-year-old brother and my half-brother, who was in his 40s, still had a full head of hair, as did my late dad, who passed away in 2015 aged 66. During the hair transplant Michael wondered what his new hair would look like Being shy already, I didn’t feel I could confide in anyone and it began to affect my confidence. By the time I was 28 I stopped going out with my mates as often, as I felt so self-conscious. Working in a social club, I would try to avoid eye contact with customers, as I felt embarrassed about my hairline. If I saw a rare picture of myself that someone had taken without me knowing I’d cringe. It really affected my love life, too, as I couldn’t even bear to look in a mirror, let alone get intimate with someone. I didn’t know how anyone could fancy me. Throughout my late 20s I did my best to cover up my baldness by keeping my hair in a mop-head style, while secretly trying everything I could – caffeine shampoos, hair growth supplements and lotions – but none of them worked. [quote]By the summer of 2017 I was nearly 30, but looked and felt like a lonely middle-aged bloke[/quote] On a routine check-up with my GP, my doctor noticed my hair loss and offered to test my testosterone levels, which came back normal. By the summer of 2017 I was nearly 30, but looked and felt like a lonely middle-aged bloke. I knew I had to do something about it, so I started researching hair transplants. I didn’t mention my plans to anyone until Christmas Day that year, when I was playing with my two-year-old nephew’s Spider-Man mask and he suddenly yanked it off me, exposing my receding hairline. My family gasped – because I’d always combed my hair over, they hadn’t had a clue about how bald I’d got. I could tell Mum was shocked, but it was the push I needed to tell them about my plan to have a hair transplant. [quote]Nearly a year on I’m getting my hair cut every month and no longer hate looking in the mirror[/quote] Thankfully, they said if I really wanted to do it they supported me 100%. I had my first consultation at The Hair Dr in Leeds in January 2018, and a few weeks later I used my savings to have FUE (follicle unit extraction), which involves removing hair follicles and their roots and transplanting them to areas that no longer have hair. It wasn’t painful, as I’d been given a local anaesthetic, but it took 12 hours to do 4,000 grafts. Looking in the mirror afterwards, it was still hard to imagine what my hair would eventually look like, and that night I had to sleep upright with a travel pillow so I didn’t roll on to the transplant sections. Now Michael gets his hair cut every month and enjoys styling it into a quiff A week later I went through the ‘ugly duckling’ stage, where the original transplanted hairs start to fall out to make way for new ones. I’d been warned about it so wasn’t too shocked, but I had to be patient as it took another five months for new hair to grow. It was during that time that I went on my friend’s stag do and no one could believe I’d had a transplant, as I was still pretty bald. But by the summer my hair finally began to grow back. I got my first proper haircut that September, which I was even able to style into a quiff for the first time. Nearly a year on I’m getting my hair cut every month and no longer hate looking in the mirror. I now look forward to going out with the lads instead of dreading it, while next on my to-do list is dating. I’m almost confident enough to approach women. With hindsight I can see how much of an impact going bald had on me. It shattered my self-esteem, but now it feels like I’m getting the old me back.”   ‘Bald-shaming is so outdated’ Clay Lowe, 50, is a learning and development specialist. He lives in Leamington Spa with wife Ruth, 45, and their son Devon, 23, and daughter Brittany, 21. “Sitting at my college dorm desk, there was a knock at the door. Without a word, a fellow student came up to me, smiled then rubbed my head and left. Within seconds another student did the same. When Clay began to lose his hair he decided to shave it all off and embrace the inevitable I didn’t mind, though – my nickname was Buddha, and it had become a tradition for my friends to rub my bald head for good luck before an exam. I was more than happy to help. Growing up in New Jersey, USA, I had a full afro. As a teen I loved experimenting with my hair and went from having it really short to trying to pull off the Jheri curl look like Lionel Richie. But when I signed up with the US army at 18, I had to shave my hair into a buzz cut, just like in the movies. Some people might have hated the sound of the clippers buzzing as they watched their hair fall to the floor, but I didn’t. I liked what I saw in the mirror when it was finished – I looked smart, like I meant business, and it also made it easier to take care of my hair. A year into my cadet training in New York, the barber noticed that I was thinning on top and my hair wasn’t growing back as steadily as it used to. [quote]It probably helped that I’ve always been confident in my own skin[/quote] I was really surprised, as my afro had always been so thick that it didn’t occur to me I might ever go bald. The barber suggested we try a ‘high and tight’ to disguise it, which meant leaving some hair on the top of the scalp and shaving the back and the sides. But when he told me a few months later that I was going really thin on top, I asked him to just shave it all off. There was no point putting off the inevitable. While the thought of going bald might have put the fear of god into some men, it didn’t faze me. I certainly wasn’t the type to go for a wig or pay a fortune for plugs, and with afro hair it’s not like you even have the option of a comb-over to hide the bald patches. So why try to fight it? It probably helped that I’ve always been confident in my own skin, and if that meant embracing my baldness then I was going to do that, too. Plus, I wasn’t the only one going through it. [quote]I never considered what women might think of my baldness…I figured they either liked me as I looked or weren’t worth my time[/quote] At the military academy where I was training, students younger and older than me were losing their hair, too, so it didn’t feel like a big deal – just part of life. Instead, we’d laugh about it and give each other nicknames. As well as Buddha, I was also called Melon as my head was so smooth. Although my friends never made fun of me, sometimes my family did. We have always said in our family that the balding gene is supposed to skip a generation. My grandad didn’t have it and my dad did, so it should have skipped me, so we like to joke about the fact that it didn’t. My brother got lucky – he’s in his 30s and still has a full head of hair. When it came to dating, I never considered what women might think of my baldness, and there was no way I was going to ask anyone I was seeing for their opinion. I figured they either liked me as I looked or weren’t worth my time. Aged 10 Clay had a thick afro which he was forced to shave into a buzz cut at age 18 when he joined the US army I met my wife Ruth while at cadet training, and two years after I graduated, aged 23, we moved in together. By then I was shaving my head at home to save myself a trip to the barber, and sometimes Ruth would do it for me because I couldn’t always get to the back. She also gives the most awesome head rubs! I left the army in 1997 and now own a consultancy business. For the last 28 years I’ve shaved my head once a week. It feels like my trademark look. I’m sure stubble on the sides and back would sprout through if I didn’t shave it, but all of the crown and top of the head has gone now. Despite what some might say, I don’t think there’s a stigma attached to going bald, and anyone who tries to shame someone for it is outdated. There are so many positive role models who are bald, such as Jason Statham, Vin Diesel and Dwayne Johnson, who all embrace it. [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN FABULOUS” posts_category=”30″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] Besides, it’s thought baldness is a sign of virility, which means we have higher testosterone levels, so what could be manlier than going bald? Even if I did have hair, I’d still shave it all off because it suits me. It’s who I am.” [bc_video video_id=”5997355369001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Prince Harry’s bald spot looks bigger than ever as he greets crowds with Meghan Markle in Bristol”] GOT a story? RING The Sun on 0207 782 4104 or WHATSAPP on 07423720250 or EMAIL exclusive@the-sun.co.uk  
15 Jun 19
The Sun
Actor Rob Lowe joked that Prince William’s hair loss was a “traumatic experience”, but is it really such a big deal? Two men talk about the true impact of losing their locks. Men can lose their hair at anytime throughout their life and it is difficult to know what to do when it starts to happen ‘I felt so self-conscious I stopped going out’ Social club manager Michael Whitaker, 32, is single and lives in Leeds. “At a friend’s wedding last November, pictures from the stag do were plastered all over the gents’ loos. Michael before he embarked on the hair transplant process As people scrutinised them, they kept asking where I was in the photos. But they didn’t recognise me as the bald bloke at the back, thanks to my £6,000 hair transplant. As a kid, my hair was thick and grew quickly. I kept it short until I was about 21, then grew it long to fit in with my indie mates. It wasn’t until I decided to get it all chopped off again at 25 that I realised it had been hiding my horrifically receding hairline. I remember staring in the barber’s mirror, wondering how I hadn’t noticed that I had two big bald patches at the front of my scalp. I felt the panic rise. I was only in my mid-20s and was clearly going bald. It didn’t help that both my 31-year-old brother and my half-brother, who was in his 40s, still had a full head of hair, as did my late dad, who passed away in 2015 aged 66. During the hair transplant Michael wondered what his new hair would look like Being shy already, I didn’t feel I could confide in anyone and it began to affect my confidence. By the time I was 28 I stopped going out with my mates as often, as I felt so self-conscious. Working in a social club, I would try to avoid eye contact with customers, as I felt embarrassed about my hairline. If I saw a rare picture of myself that someone had taken without me knowing I’d cringe. It really affected my love life, too, as I couldn’t even bear to look in a mirror, let alone get intimate with someone. I didn’t know how anyone could fancy me. Throughout my late 20s I did my best to cover up my baldness by keeping my hair in a mop-head style, while secretly trying everything I could – caffeine shampoos, hair growth supplements and lotions – but none of them worked. [quote]By the summer of 2017 I was nearly 30, but looked and felt like a lonely middle-aged bloke[/quote] On a routine check-up with my GP, my doctor noticed my hair loss and offered to test my testosterone levels, which came back normal. By the summer of 2017 I was nearly 30, but looked and felt like a lonely middle-aged bloke. I knew I had to do something about it, so I started researching hair transplants. I didn’t mention my plans to anyone until Christmas Day that year, when I was playing with my two-year-old nephew’s Spider-Man mask and he suddenly yanked it off me, exposing my receding hairline. My family gasped – because I’d always combed my hair over, they hadn’t had a clue about how bald I’d got. I could tell Mum was shocked, but it was the push I needed to tell them about my plan to have a hair transplant. [quote]Nearly a year on I’m getting my hair cut every month and no longer hate looking in the mirror[/quote] Thankfully, they said if I really wanted to do it they supported me 100%. I had my first consultation at The Hair Dr in Leeds in January 2018, and a few weeks later I used my savings to have FUE (follicle unit extraction), which involves removing hair follicles and their roots and transplanting them to areas that no longer have hair. It wasn’t painful, as I’d been given a local anaesthetic, but it took 12 hours to do 4,000 grafts. Looking in the mirror afterwards, it was still hard to imagine what my hair would eventually look like, and that night I had to sleep upright with a travel pillow so I didn’t roll on to the transplant sections. Now Michael gets his hair cut every month and enjoys styling it into a quiff A week later I went through the ‘ugly duckling’ stage, where the original transplanted hairs start to fall out to make way for new ones. I’d been warned about it so wasn’t too shocked, but I had to be patient as it took another five months for new hair to grow. It was during that time that I went on my friend’s stag do and no one could believe I’d had a transplant, as I was still pretty bald. But by the summer my hair finally began to grow back. I got my first proper haircut that September, which I was even able to style into a quiff for the first time. Nearly a year on I’m getting my hair cut every month and no longer hate looking in the mirror. I now look forward to going out with the lads instead of dreading it, while next on my to-do list is dating. I’m almost confident enough to approach women. With hindsight I can see how much of an impact going bald had on me. It shattered my self-esteem, but now it feels like I’m getting the old me back.”   ‘Bald-shaming is so outdated’ Clay Lowe, 50, is a learning and development specialist. He lives in Leamington Spa with wife Ruth, 45, and their son Devon, 23, and daughter Brittany, 21. “Sitting at my college dorm desk, there was a knock at the door. Without a word, a fellow student came up to me, smiled then rubbed my head and left. Within seconds another student did the same. When Clay began to lose his hair he decided to shave it all off and embrace the inevitable I didn’t mind, though – my nickname was Buddha, and it had become a tradition for my friends to rub my bald head for good luck before an exam. I was more than happy to help. Growing up in New Jersey, USA, I had a full afro. As a teen I loved experimenting with my hair and went from having it really short to trying to pull off the Jheri curl look like Lionel Richie. But when I signed up with the US army at 18, I had to shave my hair into a buzz cut, just like in the movies. Some people might have hated the sound of the clippers buzzing as they watched their hair fall to the floor, but I didn’t. I liked what I saw in the mirror when it was finished – I looked smart, like I meant business, and it also made it easier to take care of my hair. A year into my cadet training in New York, the barber noticed that I was thinning on top and my hair wasn’t growing back as steadily as it used to. [quote]It probably helped that I’ve always been confident in my own skin[/quote] I was really surprised, as my afro had always been so thick that it didn’t occur to me I might ever go bald. The barber suggested we try a ‘high and tight’ to disguise it, which meant leaving some hair on the top of the scalp and shaving the back and the sides. But when he told me a few months later that I was going really thin on top, I asked him to just shave it all off. There was no point putting off the inevitable. While the thought of going bald might have put the fear of god into some men, it didn’t faze me. I certainly wasn’t the type to go for a wig or pay a fortune for plugs, and with afro hair it’s not like you even have the option of a comb-over to hide the bald patches. So why try to fight it? It probably helped that I’ve always been confident in my own skin, and if that meant embracing my baldness then I was going to do that, too. Plus, I wasn’t the only one going through it. [quote]I never considered what women might think of my baldness…I figured they either liked me as I looked or weren’t worth my time[/quote] At the military academy where I was training, students younger and older than me were losing their hair, too, so it didn’t feel like a big deal – just part of life. Instead, we’d laugh about it and give each other nicknames. As well as Buddha, I was also called Melon as my head was so smooth. Although my friends never made fun of me, sometimes my family did. We have always said in our family that the balding gene is supposed to skip a generation. My grandad didn’t have it and my dad did, so it should have skipped me, so we like to joke about the fact that it didn’t. My brother got lucky – he’s in his 30s and still has a full head of hair. When it came to dating, I never considered what women might think of my baldness, and there was no way I was going to ask anyone I was seeing for their opinion. I figured they either liked me as I looked or weren’t worth my time. Aged 10 Clay had a thick afro which he was forced to shave into a buzz cut at age 18 when he joined the US army I met my wife Ruth while at cadet training, and two years after I graduated, aged 23, we moved in together. By then I was shaving my head at home to save myself a trip to the barber, and sometimes Ruth would do it for me because I couldn’t always get to the back. She also gives the most awesome head rubs! I left the army in 1997 and now own a consultancy business. For the last 28 years I’ve shaved my head once a week. It feels like my trademark look. I’m sure stubble on the sides and back would sprout through if I didn’t shave it, but all of the crown and top of the head has gone now. Despite what some might say, I don’t think there’s a stigma attached to going bald, and anyone who tries to shame someone for it is outdated. There are so many positive role models who are bald, such as Jason Statham, Vin Diesel and Dwayne Johnson, who all embrace it. [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN FABULOUS” posts_category=”363″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] Besides, it’s thought baldness is a sign of virility, which means we have higher testosterone levels, so what could be manlier than going bald? Even if I did have hair, I’d still shave it all off because it suits me. It’s who I am.” [bc_video video_id=”5997355369001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Prince Harry’s bald spot looks bigger than ever as he greets crowds with Meghan Markle in Bristol”] GOT a story? RING The Sun on 0207 782 4104 or WHATSAPP on 07423720250 or EMAIL exclusive@the-sun.co.uk  
15 Jun 19
The Irish Sun
Actor Rob Lowe joked that Prince William’s hair loss was a “traumatic experience”, but is it really such a big deal? Two men talk about the true impact of losing their locks. Men can lose their hair at anytime throughout their life and it is difficult to know what to do when it starts to happen ‘I felt so self-conscious I stopped going out’ Social club manager Michael Whitaker, 32, is single and lives in Leeds. “At a friend’s wedding last November, pictures from the stag do were plastered all over the gents’ loos. Michael before he embarked on the hair transplant process As people scrutinised them, they kept asking where I was in the photos. But they didn’t recognise me as the bald bloke at the back, thanks to my £6,000 hair transplant. As a kid, my hair was thick and grew quickly. I kept it short until I was about 21, then grew it long to fit in with my indie mates. It wasn’t until I decided to get it all chopped off again at 25 that I realised it had been hiding my horrifically receding hairline. I remember staring in the barber’s mirror, wondering how I hadn’t noticed that I had two big bald patches at the front of my scalp. I felt the panic rise. I was only in my mid-20s and was clearly going bald. It didn’t help that both my 31-year-old brother and my half-brother, who was in his 40s, still had a full head of hair, as did my late dad, who passed away in 2015 aged 66. During the hair transplant Michael wondered what his new hair would look like Being shy already, I didn’t feel I could confide in anyone and it began to affect my confidence. By the time I was 28 I stopped going out with my mates as often, as I felt so self-conscious. Working in a social club, I would try to avoid eye contact with customers, as I felt embarrassed about my hairline. If I saw a rare picture of myself that someone had taken without me knowing I’d cringe. It really affected my love life, too, as I couldn’t even bear to look in a mirror, let alone get intimate with someone. I didn’t know how anyone could fancy me. Throughout my late 20s I did my best to cover up my baldness by keeping my hair in a mop-head style, while secretly trying everything I could – caffeine shampoos, hair growth supplements and lotions – but none of them worked. [quote]By the summer of 2017 I was nearly 30, but looked and felt like a lonely middle-aged bloke[/quote] On a routine check-up with my GP, my doctor noticed my hair loss and offered to test my testosterone levels, which came back normal. By the summer of 2017 I was nearly 30, but looked and felt like a lonely middle-aged bloke. I knew I had to do something about it, so I started researching hair transplants. I didn’t mention my plans to anyone until Christmas Day that year, when I was playing with my two-year-old nephew’s Spider-Man mask and he suddenly yanked it off me, exposing my receding hairline. My family gasped – because I’d always combed my hair over, they hadn’t had a clue about how bald I’d got. I could tell Mum was shocked, but it was the push I needed to tell them about my plan to have a hair transplant. [quote]Nearly a year on I’m getting my hair cut every month and no longer hate looking in the mirror[/quote] Thankfully, they said if I really wanted to do it they supported me 100%. I had my first consultation at The Hair Dr in Leeds in January 2018, and a few weeks later I used my savings to have FUE (follicle unit extraction), which involves removing hair follicles and their roots and transplanting them to areas that no longer have hair. It wasn’t painful, as I’d been given a local anaesthetic, but it took 12 hours to do 4,000 grafts. Looking in the mirror afterwards, it was still hard to imagine what my hair would eventually look like, and that night I had to sleep upright with a travel pillow so I didn’t roll on to the transplant sections. Now Michael gets his hair cut every month and enjoys styling it into a quiff A week later I went through the ‘ugly duckling’ stage, where the original transplanted hairs start to fall out to make way for new ones. I’d been warned about it so wasn’t too shocked, but I had to be patient as it took another five months for new hair to grow. It was during that time that I went on my friend’s stag do and no one could believe I’d had a transplant, as I was still pretty bald. But by the summer my hair finally began to grow back. I got my first proper haircut that September, which I was even able to style into a quiff for the first time. Nearly a year on I’m getting my hair cut every month and no longer hate looking in the mirror. I now look forward to going out with the lads instead of dreading it, while next on my to-do list is dating. I’m almost confident enough to approach women. With hindsight I can see how much of an impact going bald had on me. It shattered my self-esteem, but now it feels like I’m getting the old me back.”   ‘Bald-shaming is so outdated’ Clay Lowe, 50, is a learning and development specialist. He lives in Leamington Spa with wife Ruth, 45, and their son Devon, 23, and daughter Brittany, 21. “Sitting at my college dorm desk, there was a knock at the door. Without a word, a fellow student came up to me, smiled then rubbed my head and left. Within seconds another student did the same. When Clay began to lose his hair he decided to shave it all off and embrace the inevitable I didn’t mind, though – my nickname was Buddha, and it had become a tradition for my friends to rub my bald head for good luck before an exam. I was more than happy to help. Growing up in New Jersey, USA, I had a full afro. As a teen I loved experimenting with my hair and went from having it really short to trying to pull off the Jheri curl look like Lionel Richie. But when I signed up with the US army at 18, I had to shave my hair into a buzz cut, just like in the movies. Some people might have hated the sound of the clippers buzzing as they watched their hair fall to the floor, but I didn’t. I liked what I saw in the mirror when it was finished – I looked smart, like I meant business, and it also made it easier to take care of my hair. A year into my cadet training in New York, the barber noticed that I was thinning on top and my hair wasn’t growing back as steadily as it used to. [quote]It probably helped that I’ve always been confident in my own skin[/quote] I was really surprised, as my afro had always been so thick that it didn’t occur to me I might ever go bald. The barber suggested we try a ‘high and tight’ to disguise it, which meant leaving some hair on the top of the scalp and shaving the back and the sides. But when he told me a few months later that I was going really thin on top, I asked him to just shave it all off. There was no point putting off the inevitable. While the thought of going bald might have put the fear of god into some men, it didn’t faze me. I certainly wasn’t the type to go for a wig or pay a fortune for plugs, and with afro hair it’s not like you even have the option of a comb-over to hide the bald patches. So why try to fight it? It probably helped that I’ve always been confident in my own skin, and if that meant embracing my baldness then I was going to do that, too. Plus, I wasn’t the only one going through it. [quote]I never considered what women might think of my baldness…I figured they either liked me as I looked or weren’t worth my time[/quote] At the military academy where I was training, students younger and older than me were losing their hair, too, so it didn’t feel like a big deal – just part of life. Instead, we’d laugh about it and give each other nicknames. As well as Buddha, I was also called Melon as my head was so smooth. Although my friends never made fun of me, sometimes my family did. We have always said in our family that the balding gene is supposed to skip a generation. My grandad didn’t have it and my dad did, so it should have skipped me, so we like to joke about the fact that it didn’t. My brother got lucky – he’s in his 30s and still has a full head of hair. When it came to dating, I never considered what women might think of my baldness, and there was no way I was going to ask anyone I was seeing for their opinion. I figured they either liked me as I looked or weren’t worth my time. Aged 10 Clay had a thick afro which he was forced to shave into a buzz cut at age 18 when he joined the US army I met my wife Ruth while at cadet training, and two years after I graduated, aged 23, we moved in together. By then I was shaving my head at home to save myself a trip to the barber, and sometimes Ruth would do it for me because I couldn’t always get to the back. She also gives the most awesome head rubs! I left the army in 1997 and now own a consultancy business. For the last 28 years I’ve shaved my head once a week. It feels like my trademark look. I’m sure stubble on the sides and back would sprout through if I didn’t shave it, but all of the crown and top of the head has gone now. Despite what some might say, I don’t think there’s a stigma attached to going bald, and anyone who tries to shame someone for it is outdated. There are so many positive role models who are bald, such as Jason Statham, Vin Diesel and Dwayne Johnson, who all embrace it. [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN FABULOUS” posts_category=”24″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] Besides, it’s thought baldness is a sign of virility, which means we have higher testosterone levels, so what could be manlier than going bald? Even if I did have hair, I’d still shave it all off because it suits me. It’s who I am.” [bc_video video_id=”5997355369001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Prince Harry’s bald spot looks bigger than ever as he greets crowds with Meghan Markle in Bristol”] GOT a story? RING The Sun on 0207 782 4104 or WHATSAPP on 07423720250 or EMAIL exclusive@the-sun.co.uk  
15 Jun 19
GoldDerby
Betty Gilpin earned her first Emmy nomination last year for playing Debbie Egan, a.k.a. Liberty Belle, on the Netflix comedy “GLOW.” With Season 2, Gilpin has the material to possibly earn another nomination as Debbie became a producer and came to blows with Ruth (Alison Brie). Gilpin recently spoke with Gold Derby contributing writer Kevin Jacobsen about how Debbie would react to getting award nominations, the increase in difficulty with the physical stunts in Season 2 and how she relates to Debbie’s journey of finding her self-worth. Watch the exclusive video chat above and read the complete interview transcript below. [pmc-related-link href=”https://www.goldderby.com/video/alison-brie-interview-glow-2/” type=”SEE” target=”_blank”]Alison Brie Interview: ‘GLOW’[/pmc-related-link] Gold Derby: Betty, you were nominated for your first Emmy last year and you’ve been nominated at the Critics’ Choice Awards, our very own Gold Derby Awards and as part of your ensemble cast at the SAG Awards. My first question is, how do you think Debbie would have reacted to this level of acclaim? Betty Gilpin: I think she’d probably turn into a monster (laughs). I think she would be out on the town with Rob Lowe on the top of a building just really living her life in a sequined onesie, just screaming and forgetting that she told the babysitter she’d be home by 1. GD: You certainly haven’t had this level of accolades in your career before “GLOW” so what have these past few years been like as far as being on the red carpet and being at such an esteemed event like the Emmys? BG: It’s funny, I’ve been making my living as an actor for, I guess, 13 years now, since I was 19. So to have this fun twist happen, it’s so exciting but I’m so glad it didn’t happen when I was 19 ‘cause I feel like I would be totally swept up in it and terrified and maybe become a monster and now I feel like it’s this fun crazy pageant I get to go to and I feel so grateful but I also have things in mind like my dog and nuclear weapons (laughs). GD: Speaking of the Emmys, I wanted to talk about some of the stunt work on the show which actually won an Emmy last year for the first season and going into Season 2 of “GLOW,” your character and the rest of the wrestlers go from amateurs to having their own TV show and it really mirrors what you guys probably went through as a cast where a lot of you were amateurs at that kind of physical stunt work and now in Season 2 you have a good base of knowledge, I would imagine. Did you feel that there was an increase in difficulty when it came to the stunt work in Season 2? BG: There was definitely an increase in difficulty. Shauna Duggins became the first female stunt coordinator to win an Emmy ever and she is basically our Grace Kelly, Mr. Miyagi. We’re so lucky to work with her. We also work with Chavo Guerrero Jr., who’s a pro wrestler and our wrestling sensei. Season 1 started out with pretty rudimentary forward rolls and a very safe body slam. We went in with kid gloves and had a very Montessori stepping through these moves experience and by Season 2 they were like, “Suplex her now. Do it. We don’t have time to talk about your feelings.” It was much faster and more extreme which was so much fun. As a theater nerd, I had never played a sport ever so this is my first sport and I now understand the appeal. GD: Also, Debbie in Season 2, I think she could’ve gone in a number of different directions as a character and we ultimately see her become a producer of the “GLOW” TV show so before the season started and as things were going along, how much input did you have into what direction to take your character in? BG: Liz Flahive and Carly Mensch, the creators of “GLOW,” they had these ideas in their head long before Season 1 even started and I had said to them, “What if there was a kind of ‘9 to 5’ aspect for Debbie’s storyline of her finding empowerment in work?” And they were like, “We’re on it. We don’t need your input.” (Laughs.) But yeah, I think that they so brilliantly write Debbie as finding her power in wrestling and finding ways in which that bleeds into her finding her power in her professional life and in her personal life and then ways in which she is still a complete mess. I feel like Debbie is so many different people inside her own head and one of them is a powerful woman with a briefcase and one of them is just a sobbing pile of mascara and one of them is Liberty Belle, just completely insane. GD: Debbie’s relationship with Ruth is certainly complex and has some real baggage but it seemed like things had leveled out for a while until we get to the point where Ruth denies the network president’s sexual advances and Debbie finds out and she’s not really there for her and tells her she should have had sex with him in order to save the show and ultimately we see her in the ring with Ruth and she intentionally hurts Ruth and breaks her ankle. So what do you think Debbie is thinking in that moment and also how did you react to that reading it on the page? BG: I don’t think Debbie was like, “You should’ve had sex with him.” I think she says, “You should’ve flirted your way out of it and kept the flirty ball in the air to make him think that there was a possibility, to not make a scene,” which, I’m so disappointed in Debbie for saying that she should even do that. When I first read that scene I was very disappointed and angry and I didn’t wanna do that scene. I was, “This is anti-feminist and I’m upset,” but I realized we need to tell all sides of this story and I think it’s a window into how strong Debbie’s confidence is but how low her self-worth is and I think that her seeing that Ruth made that decision made her replay in her head moments where she didn’t think that was an option to say no or walk out. I think that Debbie’s good at treating herself with respect in some ways and in other ways she has so far to go. So I think that that really stirred up anger and self-hatred and then she just channeled it right at Ruth and lashed out. Did she intentionally break her ankle? Who hasn’t broken an ankle by accident? (Laughs.) I think she was in a Liberty Belle rage spiral and Ruth’s ankle happened to be in her hands. [pmc-related-link href=”https://www.goldderby.com/video/adrian-peng-correia-interview-glow-cinematographer-2/” type=”SEE” target=”_blank”]Adrian Peng Correia Interview: ‘GLOW’ cinematographer[/pmc-related-link] GD: Some of Debbie’s anger with that, do you think if this was maybe set in the present day as opposed to the ‘80s that Debbie would’ve had a different reaction or maybe it manifested in some other different way, to the decision on Ruth’s part to not go along with the sexual advances? BG: I certainly hope that Debbie would have a different reaction. I really hope so. It’s really interesting. They wrote this episode before the MeToo movement before any of this was even public and it just goes to show how long this has been going on. GD: The relationship between Debbie and Ruth is really the deepest relationship on the show and you and Alison Brie really are working on an intimate level, not just emotionally but physically in terms of throwing each other around the ring. So you’ve really been through a lot together. Have you ever that kind of a bond with a fellow actor before? BG: The bond that Alison and I have is pretty intense. I love her so much. No, I’ve never had a connection like this and the opportunity to play so many different levels with especially a female co-star. Usually, it’s “the girl.” We don’t usually get scenes with each other as ladies this much, let alone to play on this many different levels. I think that Ruth and Debbie, as much as they’ve been hurt by each other, the show within the show, “GLOW,” offers the perfect excuse to be close to each other and be with each other because they really know each other more than anyone else in this world and I think they’re both very lonely in different ways in their own lives and wish that they could turn to their best friend and say, “Here are the ways I’m hurting.” The heartbreaking thing is that the person that’s hurting them most is each other. GD: You also had a great episode this season with Kia Stevens, who plays Tammy, the Welfare Queen, where you explore being a working mother. What was it like just working with Kia on that and also are there other members of the ensemble that you want to work more intimately with in the future? BG: Yeah, Kia Stevens, I think she’s unbelievable. I went to theater school where I rolled around on the floor and cried about my childhood and did Shakespeare monologues for four years for $10 billion. I was like, “That’s what you need to do to be an actor” and then Kia’s like, “Oh, it’s my first time acting but I’ll give it a go” and then blows us out of the water. She’s incredible. I love that episode so much because I think these women feel safe within the show that they’re making, “GLOW,” and try on these stronger identities in the show, “How can I empower myself? How can I be a stronger person?” And then you’re also seeing behind the curtain their weaker, sadder, darker, messier moments that they probably don’t want to be a part of the TV show about their lives. I think that Episode 4 is such a good example of that, seeing ways in which they’re superheroes and ways in which they are disappointed in themselves, I think particularly for Debbie. GD: Debbie is a character that is constantly exploring new territory where she’s really figuring out who she is, she’s negotiating her way into a producer spot, she’s using her body in a way that she never really has before. Have you also felt yourself evolving alongside her as a performer through this experience? BG: 100%. I’m also realizing I forgot to answer part of your question about other members. Yes, I wanna do a version of Episode 4 with every single person in the cast. Thinking about getting more intimate with these girls, if the brain is a house, we know each other’s basement and attic and we couldn’t get to know each other better (laughs). But I would love to act with every single one of them individually more. Yes, to answer this question, I feel a parallel track with Debbie’s empowerment journey. My high school theater teacher told me that I was a good actor from the neck up and from the neck down I was scared Betty. As much as that hurt my feelings at 15, it was completely true and continued to be true for a long time. I was just not in my body and very self-conscious and believed the business when it told me that my body’s value was to pose and try and look small in the wide shot and audition for my next job. Using my body in this weird, crazy, borderline dangerous way in this job has been a training process for my brain of, “Okay, you’ve been telling yourself that your worth is this and it’s not.” I’ve been using myself head to toe in characters from now on. Let’s hope that lasts. [pmc-related-link href=”https://www.goldderby.com/video/beth-morgan-interview-glow-costume-designer/” type=”SEE” target=”_self”]Beth Morgan Interview: ‘GLOW’ costume designer[/pmc-related-link] GD: I wanted to really briefly touch on “The Good Twin” episode as well, which was a real fan favorite episode of Season 2 where we essentially see a broadcast of “GLOW,” complete with little sketches and music videos and all sorts of fun stuff. What was it like to just be acting as your wrestling persona, Liberty Belle, the whole time and just the whole experience of doing this little one-off episode? BG: It was off-the-rails wild. I have really spent a decade being told, “Okay, let’s do it again and just take out this choice, this choice and this choice. Make it smaller. Keep it simpler.” And to have an entire episode where we just kept getting bigger and bigger and wilder and weirder, we would do a take and be like, “Okay, they’re gonna come in and tell us that was insane and we’re going to acting jail.” And then they’d come and be like, “Great, you know what? Ramp it up.” “Okay? We want a Season 3, right?” Ali and I couldn’t stop laughing. The scene where the twin comes in and finds me in the shower, I ruined such amazing takes on her part because I was choking laughing. It was so much fun. GD: Circling back to the Emmys real quick, I should note that you were the only cast member of “GLOW” nominated at the Emmys last year and I think I and a lot of others might hope that that increases a bit for Season 2. Are there other performances in Season 2 that you observed on-set that you think are really worthy of that kind of Emmy consideration? BG: Yeah, Alison Brie I think should win all of the Emmys, all of the awards that exist, Marc Maron, I mean, everyone. Just nominate everyone (laughs). Working with Alison, it feels like we’re doing 10 different scenes at once and holding each other’s hand while shivving each other under the table. I could do this job with her forever. GD: So how things left off in Season 2, the ladies are heading off to Vegas to do their show there so it’s another big transition point into a new season and I know you guys just wrapped up production on Season 3. Is there anything at all you can tease about what we should expect even just on a broader thematic level? BG: I haven’t been asked this question yet. Even though I’m in Vancouver I feel like anything I say there’s gonna be a neck dart, a Netflix neck dart will take me out. We’re in Vegas, things are crazy, we’re making the show, we’re doing it as a floor show in Vegas. I think I’m allowed to say that. I will say, there is a person who joins our cast this year that will blow your mind. GD: Intriguing. Thank you so much, Betty, and break a leg at this year’s Emmys. BG: Thank you so much!
14 Jun 19
The Irish Sun
PLAYING a swashbuckling stuntman, Keanu Reeves steals the show in the new instalment of Toy Story. His swaggering motorcyclist, Duke Caboom, is set to delight movie-goers — but under the cocky facade, the toy is plagued by doubts. Keanu Reeves stars as Duke Caboom, a swaggering motorcyclist, in the latest installment of Toy Story In order to succeed, Caboom is forced to “confront his fear of failure”. So perhaps there is nobody more suited to the role than Keanu, who is all too used to battling adversity. The hard-working actor, 54, has endured a life of tragedy and heartache. The son of an absent father who ended up behind bars, Keanu’s life has been rocked by shocking deaths and illness. His only child, Ava, was stillborn and his partner, Jennifer Syme, later died in a freak accident aged 28. Keanu Reeves was born in 1964 in Beirut, Lebanon He said in 2006, five years after Jennifer’s death: “Grief changes shape but it never ends. People have a ­misconception that you can deal with it and say, ‘It’s gone, and I’m better’. “They’re wrong. When the people you love are gone, you’re alone.” Keanu has never married and, after enduring repeated heartache, cuts a forlorn figure in ­Hollywood. He said recently: “You know, I’m the lonely guy. I don’t have anyone in my life. But if it does occur, I would respect and love the other person — hopefully it’ll happen for me.” [bc_video video_id=”6039342921001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Toy Story 4 – New trailer for Disney Pixar sequel sees Woody try and rescue Forky with help from Duke Caboom voiced by Keanu Reeves”] [quote]Grief changes shape but it never ends. People have a ­misconception that you can deal with it[/quote] While he briefly dated his Speed co-star Sandra Bullock, 54, and Lost In Translation writer and director Sofia Coppola, 48, the love of his life was Jennifer, a fellow actress. The pair met in 1998 at a promotional party for his alt-rock band Dogstar and “instantly fell in love”. On Christmas Eve 1999, their daughter Ava Archer Syme-Reeves was stillborn. Under the strain of grief, the couple’s relationship collapsed within weeks. It was two years after the ­heartbreak of losing baby Ava that Jennifer attended a party hosted by goth rocker Marilyn Manson. [quote]I’ve always loved you, River. River is my best friend and I don’t have many of them[/quote] Though she was given a lift home from the Hollywood bash, she allegedly drove her Jeep back to the party while drunk and crashed into a row of parked cars. She was thrown from the front seat and died instantly. Keanu was said to have found it “very, very difficult to cope with her death” and harnessed his grief as the troubled title character in John Wick, who lost his wife in the 2014 film. He said: “I thought it was one of the foundations of the role. I love his grief. For the character and in life, it’s about the love of the person you’re grieving for. Any time you can keep company with that fire, it is warm. “I relate to that, and I don’t think you ever work through it. Grief and loss don’t ever go away.” Keanu Reeves and River Phoenix starred together in the 1991 movie My Own Private Idaho Both have been constants in Keanu’s life. Best friend and actor River ­Phoenix died in October 1993. The Stand By Me star, 23, collapsed outside Hollywood music venue The Viper Room after ­taking a “Speedball” — a combination of ­morphine and cocaine. Phoenix said Keanu was “like my older brother. But shorter”. In a joint interview, Keanu told him: “I’ve always loved you, River. River is my best friend and I don’t have many of them.” In 1999 Reeves’ girlfriend, Jennifer Syme, gave birth eight months into her pregnancy to Ava Archer Syme-Reeves, who was stillborn Keanu, who was 23 at the time, was filming blockbuster Speed with ­Sandra when River died. Sandra said: “I think Keanu has gone through a lot even though he doesn’t let on. He hides a great pain.” Asked about River, Keanu added: “How was I affected? How was I affected? “Uh, what do I say? I was terribly, terribly, terribly sad. Incredibly sad. And, um, I miss him very much.” Keani Reeves pictured with his two sisters Korraine and Kim at The Matrix premiere Dealt blow after blow, Keanu had previously learned that his younger sister Kim had leukaemia. He became her main carer in the early Nineties during her decade-long battle, helping to nurse her back to health. Keanu said: “She was always there for me, you know. I will always be here for her.” The siblings were born in Beirut, Lebanon, to Patricia Taylor — a showgirl and costume designer — and geologist Samuel Reeves. Reeves’ father Samuel suffered with drug addiction and walked out on the family when Keanu was just three When Keanu was three, Samuel walked out on the family. Patricia, originally from Essex, constantly moved house with her kids during their childhoods, raising them in Hawaii, Australia and New York before finally settling in Canada. But Keanu’s relationship with his dad caused him significant pain over the years. In 1994, Samuel was arrested for possession of cocaine and heroin and sentenced to ten years in jail. When asked about their relationship, Keanu said: “The story with me and my dad’s pretty heavy. It’s full of pain and woe and f***ing loss and all that s**t.” [quote]The story with me and my dad’s pretty heavy. It’s full of pain and woe[/quote] He was 13 when he last saw his father. Samuel tried to get back in touch in the mid-Nineties, at the height of Keanu’s fame, but the star “didn’t reach back out”. Keanu’s first acting job came on the Canadian series Hangin’ In in 1984. Then he moved to LA and made his big-screen debut in 1986 drama Youngblood, opposite Rob Lowe and Patrick Swayze. His career reached new heights after appearing with Winona Ryder in Bram Stoker’s Dracula in 1992, and the action movie Speed in 1994. Then things went stratospheric when he was cast in The Matrix five years later. Winona Ryder and Keanu Reeves pictured together in 2018 But stardom did not seem to change Keanu, who is considered the nicest man in Hollywood. He reportedly gave the ancillary profits from The Matrix — including money made from streaming and airline plays — to the film’s crew, netting them £26million. He said later: “I would rather people didn’t know that. It was something I could afford, a worthwhile thing.” In 1997, he was pictured sharing drinks and snacks with a homeless man, and once came to the rescue of The Help star Octavia Spencer when her car broke down in LA. Keanu Reeves voices Duke Caboom in Toy Story 4 She said: “No one would help me. It wasn’t until Keanu Reeves came by. He was on a motor- cycle, wearing his helmet and sunglasses and I didn’t recognise him.” In March, a flight he was on made an emergency landing in Bakersfield, California. Keanu organised a bus for the stranded passengers to get to LA, 100 miles away. Those who work with him have only positive things to say, too. Toy Story 4 director Josh Cooley was blown away by the star’s attitude. He asked to meet for lunch to discuss Duke Caboom and started “embodying the character to the point where he was posing and jumping up on a table”. [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN TV & SHOWBIZ” posts_category=”169″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] Josh added: “He would ask these really deep character questions, and you couldn’t ignore them.” Keanu wanted to know what drives Duke Caboom? What is the toy afraid of? But perhaps he could turn the questions on himself. After so many years of personal tragedy, surely there is nothing Keanu cannot handle.  Toy Story 4 (U) is released nationwide next Friday. [bc_video video_id=”6039342921001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Toy Story 4 – New trailer for Disney Pixar sequel sees Woody try and rescue Forky with help from Duke Caboom voiced by Keanu Reeves”] GOT a story? RING The Sun on 0207 782 4104 or WHATSAPP on 07423720250 or EMAIL exclusive@the-sun.co.uk
14 Jun 19
The Sun
PLAYING a swashbuckling stuntman, Keanu Reeves steals the show in the new instalment of Toy Story. His swaggering motorcyclist, Duke Caboom, is set to delight movie-goers — but under the cocky facade, the toy is plagued by doubts. Keanu Reeves stars as Duke Caboom, a swaggering motorcyclist, in the latest installment of Toy Story In order to succeed, Caboom is forced to “confront his fear of failure”. So perhaps there is nobody more suited to the role than Keanu, who is all too used to battling adversity. The hard-working actor, 54, has endured a life of tragedy and heartache. The son of an absent father who ended up behind bars, Keanu’s life has been rocked by shocking deaths and illness. His only child, Ava, was stillborn and his partner, Jennifer Syme, later died in a freak accident aged 28. Keanu Reeves was born in 1964 in Beirut, Lebanon He said in 2006, five years after Jennifer’s death: “Grief changes shape but it never ends. People have a ­misconception that you can deal with it and say, ‘It’s gone, and I’m better’. “They’re wrong. When the people you love are gone, you’re alone.” Keanu has never married and, after enduring repeated heartache, cuts a forlorn figure in ­Hollywood. He said recently: “You know, I’m the lonely guy. I don’t have anyone in my life. But if it does occur, I would respect and love the other person — hopefully it’ll happen for me.” [bc_video video_id=”6039342921001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Toy Story 4 – New trailer for Disney Pixar sequel sees Woody try and rescue Forky with help from Duke Caboom voiced by Keanu Reeves”] [quote]Grief changes shape but it never ends. People have a ­misconception that you can deal with it[/quote] While he briefly dated his Speed co-star Sandra Bullock, 54, and Lost In Translation writer and director Sofia Coppola, 48, the love of his life was Jennifer, a fellow actress. The pair met in 1998 at a promotional party for his alt-rock band Dogstar and “instantly fell in love”. On Christmas Eve 1999, their daughter Ava Archer Syme-Reeves was stillborn. Under the strain of grief, the couple’s relationship collapsed within weeks. It was two years after the ­heartbreak of losing baby Ava that Jennifer attended a party hosted by goth rocker Marilyn Manson. [quote]I’ve always loved you, River. River is my best friend and I don’t have many of them[/quote] Though she was given a lift home from the Hollywood bash, she allegedly drove her Jeep back to the party while drunk and crashed into a row of parked cars. She was thrown from the front seat and died instantly. Keanu was said to have found it “very, very difficult to cope with her death” and harnessed his grief as the troubled title character in John Wick, who lost his wife in the 2014 film. He said: “I thought it was one of the foundations of the role. I love his grief. For the character and in life, it’s about the love of the person you’re grieving for. Any time you can keep company with that fire, it is warm. “I relate to that, and I don’t think you ever work through it. Grief and loss don’t ever go away.” Keanu Reeves and River Phoenix starred together in the 1991 movie My Own Private Idaho Both have been constants in Keanu’s life. Best friend and actor River ­Phoenix died in October 1993. The Stand By Me star, 23, collapsed outside Hollywood music venue The Viper Room after ­taking a “Speedball” — a combination of ­morphine and cocaine. Phoenix said Keanu was “like my older brother. But shorter”. In a joint interview, Keanu told him: “I’ve always loved you, River. River is my best friend and I don’t have many of them.” In 1999 Reeves’ girlfriend, Jennifer Syme, gave birth eight months into her pregnancy to Ava Archer Syme-Reeves, who was stillborn Keanu, who was 23 at the time, was filming blockbuster Speed with ­Sandra when River died. Sandra said: “I think Keanu has gone through a lot even though he doesn’t let on. He hides a great pain.” Asked about River, Keanu added: “How was I affected? How was I affected? “Uh, what do I say? I was terribly, terribly, terribly sad. Incredibly sad. And, um, I miss him very much.” Keani Reeves pictured with his two sisters Korraine and Kim at The Matrix premiere Dealt blow after blow, Keanu had previously learned that his younger sister Kim had leukaemia. He became her main carer in the early Nineties during her decade-long battle, helping to nurse her back to health. Keanu said: “She was always there for me, you know. I will always be here for her.” The siblings were born in Beirut, Lebanon, to Patricia Taylor — a showgirl and costume designer — and geologist Samuel Reeves. Reeves’ father Samuel suffered with drug addiction and walked out on the family when Keanu was just three When Keanu was three, Samuel walked out on the family. Patricia, originally from Essex, constantly moved house with her kids during their childhoods, raising them in Hawaii, Australia and New York before finally settling in Canada. But Keanu’s relationship with his dad caused him significant pain over the years. In 1994, Samuel was arrested for possession of cocaine and heroin and sentenced to ten years in jail. When asked about their relationship, Keanu said: “The story with me and my dad’s pretty heavy. It’s full of pain and woe and f***ing loss and all that s**t.” [quote]The story with me and my dad’s pretty heavy. It’s full of pain and woe[/quote] He was 13 when he last saw his father. Samuel tried to get back in touch in the mid-Nineties, at the height of Keanu’s fame, but the star “didn’t reach back out”. Keanu’s first acting job came on the Canadian series Hangin’ In in 1984. Then he moved to LA and made his big-screen debut in 1986 drama Youngblood, opposite Rob Lowe and Patrick Swayze. His career reached new heights after appearing with Winona Ryder in Bram Stoker’s Dracula in 1992, and the action movie Speed in 1994. Then things went stratospheric when he was cast in The Matrix five years later. Winona Ryder and Keanu Reeves pictured together in 2018 But stardom did not seem to change Keanu, who is considered the nicest man in Hollywood. He reportedly gave the ancillary profits from The Matrix — including money made from streaming and airline plays — to the film’s crew, netting them £26million. He said later: “I would rather people didn’t know that. It was something I could afford, a worthwhile thing.” In 1997, he was pictured sharing drinks and snacks with a homeless man, and once came to the rescue of The Help star Octavia Spencer when her car broke down in LA. Keanu Reeves voices Duke Caboom in Toy Story 4 She said: “No one would help me. It wasn’t until Keanu Reeves came by. He was on a motor- cycle, wearing his helmet and sunglasses and I didn’t recognise him.” In March, a flight he was on made an emergency landing in Bakersfield, California. Keanu organised a bus for the stranded passengers to get to LA, 100 miles away. Those who work with him have only positive things to say, too. Toy Story 4 director Josh Cooley was blown away by the star’s attitude. He asked to meet for lunch to discuss Duke Caboom and started “embodying the character to the point where he was posing and jumping up on a table”. [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN TV & SHOWBIZ” posts_category=”325″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] Josh added: “He would ask these really deep character questions, and you couldn’t ignore them.” Keanu wanted to know what drives Duke Caboom? What is the toy afraid of? But perhaps he could turn the questions on himself. After so many years of personal tragedy, surely there is nothing Keanu cannot handle.  Toy Story 4 (U) is released nationwide next Friday. [bc_video video_id=”6039342921001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Toy Story 4 – New trailer for Disney Pixar sequel sees Woody try and rescue Forky with help from Duke Caboom voiced by Keanu Reeves”] GOT a story? RING The Sun on 0207 782 4104 or WHATSAPP on 07423720250 or EMAIL exclusive@the-sun.co.uk
14 Jun 19
GeekandGear.com

PLAYING a swashbuckling stuntman, Keanu Reeves steals the show in the new instalment of Toy Story. His swaggering motorcyclist, Duke Caboom, is set to delight movie-goers — but under the cocky facade, the toy is plagued by doubts. 8 Keanu Reeves stars as Duke Caboom, a swaggering motorcyclist, in the latest installment of Toy StoryCredit: […]

14 Jun 19

“Take Me Home: The John Denver Story” is a biopic of the late folk singer. It stars Chad Lowe (brother of Rob Lowe) as John. The name of the film comes from one of John’s biggest hits. In my view, the film is alright, though calling it great would be a stretch. Personally, I think […]

14 Jun 19
Toronto Sun

ORLANDO, Fla. — Keanu Reeves’ faces crinkles slightly when he hears the phrase, “Keanussance.” Yes, the Toronto-raised actor is on a bit of a roll in 2019. First, his titular action hero John Wick slayed the box office in last month’s Parabellum. Then had Twitter obsessing over him following an over-the-top cameo, as himself, in […]

14 Jun 19
UCC Family News

Message by Eric WilsonThis Sunday’s message will be delivered by Eric Wilson entitled, “Fresh Encounter with Doubt.” Summer in Stauffer!Morning Worship in Stauffer Chapel has begun. Bible class begins at 9AM, with worship service starting at 10:15. A Message from Carolyn NicksMany thanks for the prayers, messages, cards and support over the past few months. […]

14 Jun 19
Sound Books

https://soundcloud.com/scratchmasterslider/a-day-in-the-life-vol-1-1-1 Morning Hocus Pocus, C2C & Dajla ‘Move On’ vs. Kid Koala ‘Music for Morning People’ – Morning Intro Nightmares On Wax – Rob da Bank’s Alarm Call D’Angelo and The Vanguard – Really Love DJ Shadow – Midnight In A Perfect World Erykah Badu – On & On Skygaze – Piece Of Mind C2C […]

14 Jun 19
Sound Books

https://soundcloud.com/scratchmasterslider/a-day-in-the-life-vol-1-1-1 Morning Hocus Pocus, C2C & Dajla ‘Move On’ vs. Kid Koala ‘Music for Morning People’ – Morning Intro Nightmares On Wax – Rob da Bank’s Alarm Call D’Angelo and The Vanguard – Really Love DJ Shadow – Midnight In A Perfect World Erykah Badu – On & On Skygaze – Piece Of Mind C2C […]

14 Jun 19
Sound Books

https://soundcloud.com/scratchmasterslider/a-day-in-the-life-vol-1-1-2 Morning Hocus Pocus, C2C & Dajla ‘Move On’ vs. Kid Koala ‘Music for Morning People’ – Morning Intro Nightmares On Wax – Rob da Bank’s Alarm Call D’Angelo and The Vanguard – Really Love DJ Shadow – Midnight In A Perfect World Erykah Badu – On & On Skygaze – Piece Of Mind C2C […]

14 Jun 19
Sound Books

https://soundcloud.com/scratchmasterslider/a-day-in-the-life-vol-1-1-3 Morning Hocus Pocus, C2C & Dajla ‘Move On’ vs. Kid Koala ‘Music for Morning People’ – Morning Intro Nightmares On Wax – Rob da Bank’s Alarm Call D’Angelo and The Vanguard – Really Love DJ Shadow – Midnight In A Perfect World Erykah Badu – On & On Skygaze – Piece Of Mind C2C […]

14 Jun 19
News Directory

As the New Orleans Pelicans are listening to trade offers for Anthony Davis at the moment, the Los Angeles Lakers are trying to bring it ashore after they try February 7 to do. Almost five months from these initial trade talks, both the Lakers and the Pilgrims have made changes in the front office and […]