Walmart Black Friday

23 Jan 19
lazybeachgrl

It took me a while to take the Poshmark plunge. I read reviews and, like most reviews, they were mixed. Some people swore by the amazing sales they were getting, some people complained they didn’t make any money, some people complained they purchased something and never received it…yada, yada, yada. But, after careful consideration and […]

23 Jan 19
innovatorx

Black Friday is the annual opportunity to pick up nearly everything on your wishlist at a deep discount. But if you’re looking for a TV and home audio equipment upgrade, the best deals of the year can be had just before the Super Bowl every February. The biggest retailers are slashing prices on TVs from […]

23 Jan 19
Bassoon Babe

If you’re anything like me, you can’t imagine your life without your closest friends by your side. I my case, I met all of my best friends in high school through being involved in the marching band. I joined the flute section in my school’s marching band my sophomore year. That year yielded unbelievable growth […]

23 Jan 19
WWF

  OCASIO-CORTEZ, NYC FEARS WORLD WILL END IN 12 YEARS..DUE TO GLOBAL WARMING, CLIMATE CHANGE =================== THE WALL TRUMP MIGHT DECLARE STATE OF EMERGENCY , USE OF ARMED FORCES, PRES CAN UNDERTAKE MILITARY CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS THIS WAY.. 1/3 OF THE NEEDED LAND IS OWNED BY FEDERAL GOVT OR NATIVE AMERICANS… 2/3 OF THE LAND IS […]

23 Jan 19
9to5Toys
Update (1/23 @ 11:45 am): Walmart is offering the refurbished iPhone 6 32GB with Straight Talk for $69.99 shipped. That’s about $80 off what we typically see on Amazon and beats our previous mentions by about $30. Customers will receive a 90-day warranty with their purchase. Walmart offers the Apple iPhone 6 32GB with pre-paid Straight Talk Wireless Service for $99 shipped. For comparison, this model usually sells for $149. Today’s deal is a match of our Black Friday 2018 and previous mentions. This device is ideal for kids or grandparents who do not need the latest tech. iPhone 6 sports a 4.7-inch Retina display, includes Touch ID, an 8MP camera and more. Going the pre-paid route is a great way to keep costly service fees in check since you only need to re-up at your discretion. With your savings, make sure to grab a new case to keep this iPhone safe. It’s easy for us to recommend this clear case with stellar ratings. Apple iPhone 6 features: 4G LTE Apple iOS 4.7″ Retina HD display Battery Talk Time up to 24 hours Wi-Fi Capable Dimensions: 5.44″ H x 2.64″ W x 0.27 ” D 8 MP Camera/ 1.2 MP Front Facing Camera GPS Capabilities Bluetooth 4.1 Wireless Technology
23 Jan 19
World Site News

Hong Kong (CNN Business)China’s economy may be slowing down, but the country is still set to eclipse the United States as the world’s top retail market for the first time.Retail sales in China will reach more than $5.6 trillion this year, about $100 billion more than in the United States, according to research published Wednesday…

23 Jan 19
Red Bluff Daily News
The following information is compiled from Red Bluff Police Department, Red Bluff Fire, Tehama County Sheriff’s Department, Corning Police Department, Corning Fire, Cal Fire and California Highway Patrol logs. Animal McCoy Road: A cow was found on the dirt portion of McCoy about 11:50 a.m. Saturday with its ears chewed and a bloody face and two dogs near the cow. A second report involving dogs going after cattle on McCoy was made about 3 p.m. Saturday. Another report around midday Sunday was made on Matlock Loop involving a black pit bull. Alta Vista Court: A man keeps finding his cats shot and then put onto his property. Arrests Alberto Delgado-Aguilar: 61, of Corning was arrested Friday in the area of Hoag, east of Marguerite and charged with DUI resulting in bodily injury. Bail was $76,900. Anthony Edward Gniech: 51, of Red Bluff was arrested Friday in the 9700 block of First Avenue and charged with criminal threats. Bail was $50,000. Cody Lee Kilburger: 24, of Gerber was arrested Friday in the area of San Benito and Vestal and charged with burglary. Bail was $80,000. Olivia Christine Rome: 26, of Red Bluff was arrested Friday in the 300 block of Walnut Street and charged with carrying dirk or dagger and attempted burglary. Bail was $92,500. Rodrigo Gutierrez-Sosa: 40, of Corning was arrested Saturday in the 7500 block of Plumas Drive and charged with taking vehicle without owners consent. Bail was $50,000. Andrea Marie Austin: 37, of Corning was arrested Sunday in the 23100 block of Flournoy Avenue and charged with assault with force likely to produce great bodily injury. Bail was $30,000. Rodrigo Adrian Gonzalez-Garcia: 44, of Anchorage was arrested Monday at Rolling Hills Casino and charged with burglary. Gary Lee Maniord: 57, of Los Molinos was arrested Monday in the 7900 block of Oak Street in Los Molinos and charged with threaten to commit crime: death or great bodily injury. Bill Steven McCabe: 21, of Red Bluff was arrested Sunday at Walmart and charged with forgery. Brenna Sue Plummer: 34, of Red Bluff, also known as Brenna Sue Palacios of Red Bluff was arrested Monday in the 800 block of Shasta Avenue and charged with buy or receive stolen vehicle or equipment. Bail was $19,500. Crash State Route 36E, West of Ponderosa Way: A 66-year-old Red Bluff woman was airlifted to Mercy Medical Center in Redding with major injuries following a crash at 3:55 p.m. Sunday. Jan Byrd was a passenger in a 2007 Toyota driven by Teresa Lynn Welker, 56, of Red Bluff. The road was covered in a layer of fresh hail and Welker lost control, hitting a guard rail. Thefts South Siskiyou Loop, cross of Humboldt Drive: A person broke into the volunteer fire station in Rancho Tehama between Jan. 14 and Saturday and took a chain saw and battery. Brookridge Drive: A gray 2010 Scion XD four door was taken Monday from a Red Bluff residence. Meadowbrook Lane: A man reported several items taken from his residence during the day Monday, possibly by two transients he let stay. Missing items included two computers and a cell phone. Rowles Road: A Vina company reported Friday someone tried to drive a company vehicle off the property, but got stuck.
23 Jan 19
The Colorado Sun
PUEBLO — It’s a late Friday afternoon on Pueblo’s Santa Fe Avenue, a two-lane strip of road that winds out east of the Steel City, as it’s still sometimes called. The street crests a hill and runs into a part of the county known as the Mesa, where Family Dollar, Dollar Tree and Dollar General stores all are within walking distance of each other on this busy boulevard also populated by fast-food stores, strip malls, drive-up banks and gas stations. These are three of the 18 deep-discount retailers that have filled in the gaps as conventional grocers have pulled up stakes in Pueblo County. They offer walking-distance convenience and lower prices than even the four Walmart stores in the area. And it’s evident that Pueblo needs the dollar stores as much as the dollar stores need the southern Colorado city. The are 18 dollar stores in Pueblo County, Colorado, which has a population of about 166,000 people. Along a stretch of the city of Pueblo’s South Santa Fe Avenue Family Dollar, Dollar General and Dollar Tree are within three-tenths of a mile of each other. (Mike Sweeney, Special to The Colorado Sun) One of the city’s poorest neighborhoods, Salt Creek, sits along the same stretch of Santa Fe Avenue, near where Colorado Fuel & Iron Company dumped a byproduct known as black slag that created a Superfund site. Roll a bit farther and Santa Fe turns into the business route of U.S. 50, where migrant and middle class families live near the chile farms for which the area is known. A small grocery store, LaGree’s, one of three in the chain (the others are in Cripple Creek and Divide) serves the area. Just beyond the market, a Family Dollar does brisk business near the town of Avondale, where family grocery stores shut down long ago.   A couple miles to the north of the Mesa’s commercial strip are Pueblo’s East Side neighborhoods. The sole grocery store there, a Safeway, closed two years ago. Two Family Dollars, two Dollar Trees and two Dollar Generals picked up the slack. One of the city’s main thoroughfares, Pueblo Boulevard, is a patchwork of these dollar stores. A new, much larger Dollar General, offering more frozen foods, opened in early December on the city’s West Side. Shauna Engle looks through the clearance rack in front of the South Santa Fe Avenue Family Dollar store on Nov. 30, 2018 in Pueblo, Colorado. (Mike Sweeney, Special to The Colorado Sun) New jobs have been announced in Pueblo County — 200 at Vestas’ wind tower factory, one of the city’s largest employers, and 160 at a proposed new fresh-produce distribution center. And the county’s cannabis economy continues to grow.  But Pueblo hasn’t regained its economic footing in the way other Front Range communities have and many people depend on the proximity of these deep-discount stores to stretch their budgets and meet their basic needs. Like other communities across the country that are trying to reinvent their once-thriving economies, Pueblo is grappling with how to rebuild a strong economic base that takes into account the necessity of national deep-discount retailers as well as growth from Pueblo-based businesses.   Unlike other places, such as Tulsa, Oklahoma, and towns in Lake County, California,  where local officials have a more uneasy relationship with the dollar store chains or have passed zoning restrictions against them altogether, Pueblo has looked to these stores as a necessary part of economic development. The demographics influence business “How does a community remain competitive and allow a base for any retailer to be successful in the community?” said Chris Markuson, director of economic development for Pueblo County. “We believe it’s two-fold. The first is consumer education about purchasing power. The second piece is growing the median income and the household wealth across the entire community.” The city champions “made-in-Pueblo” businesses, such as the longtime family farms on the Mesa, the revival of businesses like Walter’s Brewery and Taproom, and new concepts, such as TickTock Pueblo, a pay-as-you-go coffee house and coworking space. And Markuson pointed to the city’s “Buy Local” campaign to encourage growth of the county’s family farms as well as the independent businesses that have opened or expanded in Pueblo in recent years using the city’s enterprise zone and tax credit program, like the bath-products company Formulary 55 and coffee roasters Solar Roast and Gypsy Java, as well as Pueblo’s success in being a warehousing and distribution hub for national retailers. “National retail can coexist with local retail,” Markuson said. “The difficulty is at what point are consumers able to choose to purchase things at a local, independent retailer as opposed to a national retailer. A big function of that is how much they’re earning in a paycheck.” Pueblo’s unemployment rate for October 2018 was 4.6 percent, compared to the state rate of  3.2 percent for the same period. But it’s Pueblo’s poverty rate — 18.2  percent in 2017 (defined as the percentage of people with income below the poverty line of $24,860 for a family of four), compared with the state poverty rate of 10.3 percent — that makes every dollar matter to the area’s poorest families. Pueblo’s median household income was $42,386 in 2017, according to the U.S. Census, compared with the state median income of $65,458 for the same period. It’s also a city that has generations of poverty entrenched in the community despite other economic forces, according to Anne Stattelman, the longtime former director of Posada, a nonprofit that provides emergency housing and shelter to families. That’s what these dollar stores are betting on, said Colorado State University, Pueblo’s Abhay Shah, who teaches a course in retail management and is associate dean at the university’s Hasan School of Business. “Pueblo is a poor socioeconomic area,” he said. “The Family Dollars and Dollar Generals saw an opportunity to come in and offer prices that are lower than a Walmart … Their typical set-up is a small store relative to Walmart, people who work there are paid minimum wage, and their overhead is low.” Sherry Gomez finishes up a shopping trip at the Family Dollar along South Santa Fe Ave. Nov. 30, 2018 in Pueblo, Colo. Gomez says she shops dollar stores in part because her East Side neighborhood grocery store, Safeway, closed in 2016. (Mike Sweeney, Special to The Colorado Sun) That’s what keeps Sherry Gomez, who lives on the city’s East Side, shopping at the dollar stores on nearby Santa Fe Avenue. “I can get pretty much all I need here and up the street,” she said as she loaded bags from the Family Dollar into her trunk. Dollar General and Dollar Tree are within about three-tenths of a mile. “Pretty much anything that I could get at Walmart — and it’s not as overwhelming.” Though Gomez makes a special trip, or “loop” as she calls it, every week or so to do her shopping, others use the stores because they’re conveniently located on the way home from work. One of those is Shauna Engle, 50, who lives on the Mesa. “I’ll stop by to pick up something I need when I don’t want to drive all the way into town,” Engle said, as she looked through a rack of clothes outside the store. Cash-strapped folks “our BFFs” Dollar stores are the new Walmarts for the poorer rural and city areas, according to Penn State University sociologist Ann Tickamyer, who has studied poor areas of southern Ohio where manufacturing has shut down and many businesses have closed up shop. “The larger phenomenon is that there’s a lot of deprivation and hardship in these areas,” she said. “And they do to some extent provide jobs and cheaper prices.” Though Dollar General wouldn’t give specifics on how it decides where to open stores and didn’t respond to requests for an interview for this story, company spokeswoman Crystal Ghassemi said in an email that when choosing store locations, “we generally serve customers within a 3- to 5-mile radius, or 10-minute drive. We also take demographic trends, competitive factors, traffic patterns and community concerns into consideration.” But in a meeting with investors in 2016, Dollar General’s then chief merchandising officer Jim Thorpe called cash-strapped families earning less than $35,000 a year “our best friends forever.” At the time, this one demographic accounted for 43 percent of the chain’s $22 billion in annual sales, Bloomberg reported. The company opened 1,315 stores in 2017 and logged $23.5 billion in sales. By last summer, Dollar General and Dollar Tree had about 30,000 stores between them, thriving as other retailers founder or reinvent themselves to compete with the small-box discount stores, Forbes reported. Out on U.S. 50, beyond the farms that produce one of the county’s most valued exports — the green chiles branded with the Pueblo name and stocked by the posh grocer Whole Foods, instead of the more famous Hatch chiles from New Mexico  — you hit Avondale, a small community of mostly working class and working poor, including the many migrants who tend the surrounding farms. Stores follow U.S. 50 east On a dirt road turnoff across from Avondale Elementary, you’ll find El Centro de los Pobres and Sister Nancy Crafton, a lay nun and nurse who has been providing food, housing assistance, and medical care to migrants and the poor who come here from all across the state for 30 years. Sister Nancy, as she’s known throughout the county, is grateful that the dollar stores are here.   “Anything is appreciated in this climate of extreme poverty,” she said as she greeted and hugged the many people who sat waiting for assistance with bills, with health concerns, or just to check in. Sister Nancy Crafton, of the Sisters of Charity, shown here in a Dec. 3, 2018, photo, is in charge of El Centro de Los Pobres in Avondale, Colorado. Crafton views dollar stores as a lifeline for the poor when many others often see them as blight. (Mike Sweeney, Special to The Colorado Sun) “These stores have become our mom-and-pops. Our families only have very limited dollars, so if they are able to buy the tools to fix a car battery or windshield, artificial flowers for their shrines or to commemorate someone passing, and especially a small toy for a dollar for their children, these stores are serving a need for them in this diminished economy.” Dimas, 38, who goes only by his first name, helps Crafton and her volunteer staff gather and organize the boxes of food, clothes, and personal care supplies donated by area churches, restaurants and grocery stores. Once a landscaper, he was injured in an ATV accident that left him unable to walk without pushing a walker. He said he depends on the nearby dollar stores for basics: eggs, bottled water, beans, dish detergent, toothpaste. “I also get my phone cards there,” he said, adding that he sometimes sends boxes back to Honduras. Dimas, shown here at a Pueblo, Colorado, Dollar General store along South Santa Fe Ave. Dec. 3, 2018, shops dollar stores weekly. A former migrant worker, he was disabled in an ATV accident. (Mike Sweeney, Special to The Colorado Sun) On a recent day at the Dollar General, he loaded up his cart with a case of water priced at $3.50; a 64 oz. bottle of dish detergent, $1; two large cans of menudo for $3.50 each; a new toothbrush at $1; and a 12-pack of Coke marked three for $10. “I also buy cleaning stuff here when I need it,” he said. Like Sherry Gomez on Santa Fe Avenue, he makes the dollar store loop when he can get a ride, since his injured legs don’t allow him to drive. “I go to them instead of Walmart,” he said. “I can get a lot more.” More from The Colorado Sun Sunriser: The battle over clean power, Coloradans have a lot of student debt, Pueblo’s dollar stores, Polis’ first law and more Dollar stores — 18 of them — have filled in gaps as conventional grocers pulled up stakes in Pueblo The first bill Jared Polis will sign into law involves beer Nearly half of all young adults in Colorado owe money on a student loan, study examining state’s $26 billion ledger shows Denver teachers vote to strike with overwhelming majority in favor; Gov. Jared Polis to try and broker a deal
23 Jan 19
Sincerely, Shelbi

Wow I really haven’t written anything in so long! I’ve just been so busy (not really) with work and, well……. work. If we’re being honest, I’ve just been really lazy when it comes to writing. I sometimes feel that whatever I write people won’t want to read or won’t find it interesting enough. So I […]

22 Jan 19
Ace Backwords Blog

Ace Backwords January 22, 2018 at 11:11 PM ·  There’s no business like Show Business. 12 Comments 1 Share 14Steven Towberman and 13 others Share 1 year ago Ace Backwords updated his cover photo. January 22, 2018 at 2:15 PM ·  About 2 months old. They love to play all day. 4 Comments 32Cathy Hooper Lowe, Marcella Evans […]

22 Jan 19
Simply Me

Happy New Year and HELLO 2019!!!I know it seems that I started my blog and disappeared.Between the holidays, traveling to New York and than a quick turn around and headed to Disney World (both trips blog post coming soon) I am back and with a whole new design. Over the Thanksgiving holiday week ( I […]

22 Jan 19
GeekandGear.com

Roku Premiere 4K HDR for $29.99, NVIDIA Shield with Gaming Controller for $168, 65″ Vizio M-Series 4K HDR Smart HDTV for $550, Kingdom Hearts III in 7 Days. Want more deals? Join the IGN Deals Newsletter. By Eric Song and IGN Staff Welcome to IGN’s Daily Deals, your source for the best deals on the […]

22 Jan 19
The General Review

Peter was a Southern navel gazer in the fashion that stopped being viable as soon as the clock struck twelve on 1990, really collapsing, he often thought, with the Gulf War. He spent his afternoons on his back porch, remembering kayak-tripping down rivers in Tennessee and hiking the mountains of Virginia. After college, Peter had […]

22 Jan 19
Planes, Boats and Bicycles

Disclaimer: “We are not spokespersons or officially affiliated with Amazon in any way. This account is of our personal experience as seasonal employees in the Campbellsville, KY distribution center in 2018.  Subject information is to change.” Intro We moved onto our sailboat in April 2015 (“We’re Here!”), and spent our first hurricane season in Georgia at […]