A.i

17 Jul 19
screenjives

The Fresh Prince has had a long and illustrious career with films like Ali, The Pursuit of Happyness, Six Degrees of Separation, The Legend of Bagger Vance before I am Legend, Concussion, Seven Pounds, Collateral and a few more to stretch his acting prowess. This accompanied by  Independence Day, Bad Boys, Men in Black, Wild […]

17 Jul 19
Doug Hawley

 356 Words                                          After twenty three rejections of my masterpiece “House Of Rats”, I started looking for a more reasonable publisher.  The publishers and editors that I had been dealing with were a bunch of snobbish Ivy League arts and literature majors that couldn’t tell a good story to save their lives.  They’d probably turn down […]

17 Jul 19
Judul Situs

Tokenizing Opportunities About Canlead Limited was registered on the 14 December 2016 in the United Kingdom (Reg No. 10524761) to provide software and services. Canlead has built and maintained the Canlead platform beta version since 2018. Qindel Group is a technology consulting partner based in Madrid, Spain is working in conjunction with Canlead, utilising their […]

17 Jul 19
Science Bitch

An A.I. program learns it’s at risk of being shut down, how will it respond? The best sci-fi short films… Director’s Statement: While Watch Room might be considered both science and fiction, its core concerns are far more rooted in the former. Luminaries across scientific disciplines have warned of the perils inherent in developing AI. […]

17 Jul 19
Fortune
Silicon Valley has its guard down when it comes to the threat posed by state-sponsored hackers and snoops. That was the consensus of a group of cybersecurity experts in a roundtable discussion at the Fortune Brainstorm Tech conference in Aspen, Colo., on Tuesday. “I think people in the Valley are naïve to the foreign nation-state threat,” said Tim Junio, the co-founder and CEO of Expanse, a San Francisco-based startup that helps clients monitor and reduce their digital “attack surface” and whose investors include TPG Growth, Palantir Technologies co-founder Peter Thiel, and Michael Dell. “It’s incredibly rare—and late in the game—for companies to think about the fact that foreign actors are going to recruit people to penetrate their networks.” The biggest companies are acutely aware that foreign governments are looking to access their networks through any means available—whether by hacking in from outside or planting a spy inside. But startups are much less likely to view themselves as potential targets of state-sponsored activity. “I do think that in Silicon Valley the smaller companies are not as aware as they should be of the threat of insider breaches and foreign players like China,” said Michael Brown, former CEO of cyber security software company [hotlink]Symantec[/hotlink] and now the director of the U.S. Department of Defense’s Valley-based Defense Innovation Unit. “Should that be,” he added rhetorically, “something that our government should protect?” The relationship between Washington D.C. and Silicon Valley has been the subject of debate this week after inflammatory comments made by Thiel in a speech on Sunday. Thiel, a Facebook board member, criticized [hotlink]Alphabet[/hotlink] subsidiary Google for its decision not to continue a contract that gave the Department of Defense access to its artificial intelligence capabilities. But Brown said that the idea of a rift between the Valley and federal government was overblown. His Defense Department unit, he said, receives a lot of support from the tech community. “We see lots of companies that want to help,” said Brown. “When we send out a request, we typically get 30 to 40 responses inbound.” One way to combat the threat from foreign governments and criminal hackers alike is for companies to focus on promoting and enforcing better cyber “hygiene” in their workforce. Dorian Daley, executive vice president and general counsel of tech giant [hotlink]Oracle[/hotlink], said that the company has a security oversight committee of top execs that convenes on a quarterly basis to drill down on security issues. “We have what I call a ‘corporate colonoscopy,’” said Daley. “People need to be held accountable. They need to be called on the carpet.” Vigilance from the top down is crucial, but it’s not going to make the threat go away, argued Dmitri Alperovitch, the co-founder and CTO of cybersecurity firm CrowdStrike, which held an IPO last month. Certain foreign governments, according to Alperovitch, pose an ongoing threat. “There are only four problems in cybersecurity: China, Russia, North Korea, and Iran,” said Alperovitch, perhaps half joking. “It’s not just not the nation-state hackers. A lot of the criminals are operating out of those countries as well.” And if a network has a weakness they’ll find it eventually. More must-read stories from Fortune Brainstorm Tech 2019: —A.I.’s hidden biases continue to bedevil businesses. Can they be stopped? —Land O’Lakes CEO: Big data is helping farmers deal with climate swings —How Spotify “playlisting” turned an unknown artist into a star —U.S. risks falling behind in crypto, warns ‘Crypto Mom’ SEC commissioner —Verizon executive calls for federal privacy rules on 5GGet Fortune’s Eye on A.I. newsletter, where artificial intelligence meets industry
17 Jul 19
Korean-Electronics.com

[INQ. NO. 1907E08] GVLABS presented its world’s-first, state-of-the-art wireless charging A.I smart glasses ‘ Givor’ at the Las Vegas CES show in January 2019, drawing keen attention there. It is a smart glasses that has simultaneous interpretation using A.I and offline translation function. Since GVLABS was established in 2017, the company has been dedicated to […]

17 Jul 19
Fortune
The number of Americans who regard the threat to online privacy as a “crisis” is growing—61% share this view, according to recent polls by SurveyMonkey, which is a 10% jump from a year ago. All of this has fueled momentum from both ends of the political system to regulate companies like Facebook and [hotlink]Google[/hotlink]. But while the desire for regulation is growing, there is little consensus of how the U.S. should go about this—and some are warning of unintended consequences if Congress jumps in too quickly. At Fortune’s Brainstorm Tech conference in Aspen, Colo. Tuesday, Kai Ryssdal, host of public radio’s Marketplace, hosted a town hall in which figures from the left and right warned more federal oversight of tech companies could be a mistake. “Bureaucracies are neither unbiased nor altruistic,” warned Diane Katz, a senior research fellow at the Heritage Foundation, who added that more regulation could perversely favor tech giants like Facebook and Google, which have the legal resources to handle new compliance burdens in ways that smaller competitors do not. Meanwhile, Corynne McSherry of the Electronic Frontier Foundation said the public should be wary of big tech companies’ recent support for federal privacy legislation, saying this is a tactic to stall tougher state privacy laws. “Federal regulators are often not very good at it,” said McSherry, adding it’s a poor idea to impose one-size-fits-all laws on the technology sector. Others, including Luigi Zingales of University of Chicago Business School, argued regulation can work, providing it’s well-targeted. He gave the example of laws requiring cellular companies to port phone numbers to competitors—a result that has produced lower prices for consumers and better quality stemming from competition. Zingales decried the current approach to governing the tech industry, saying the government has effectively outsourced regulation to private entities—a point echoed by Karla Monterroso of the non-profit group Code2040, who argued the five biggest tech companies have more power than nation states, and that Congress has surrendered control over many aspects of policy and infrastructure to them. While many decried the fecklessness of Congress in overseeing the tech industry, others pointed out it’s a two-way street. “As clueless as Congress is about tech, tech is as clueless about Congress,” quipped venture capitalist Roy Bahat. “The fact that [Senator] Orrin Hatch is clueless is partly our fault.” Ultimately, much of the current crisis over tech is rooted in a concentration of power, said Zingales. But addressing this poses particular problems, notably when it comes to Facebook and Google. Even though it would be possible to break the social network into three separate companies—Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp—he predicted one of them would consolidate monopoly power all over again. As for Google, Zingales said it would be easy hive off YouTube but that applying antitrust remedies to its search engine is much harder. It’s not viable to split up control over search results into the letters A-L, he noted. Zingales also cautioned that aggressive regulation could to lead to the innovation culture of France—a country that’s long failed to produce Silicon Valley-style companies. Others went even further in defending the U.S. tech sector. Chris Tolles, CEO of content aggregation site Topix, said Facebook and Google are “national treasures in some ways” and that blowing them up could create a vacuum filled by Chinese companies. As for the challenge of regulating speech on platforms like Facebook, this too proved a divisive issue. Despite plenty of toxic content—the Anti-Defamation League provided ample examples to the Fortune gathering on Monday—Katz of Heritage said hate speech can be too nebulous to define, and that the best solution is a market-based one in which consumers simply quit platforms that offend them. Zingales, however, argued that hate is “not a bug but a feature” of platforms like Twitter, and part of a business model that relies on incendiary behavior to attract attention and users. This provided a rare moment of unanimity at the Fortune town hall: For better or worse, everyone agreed that President Trump’s stream of divisive tweets has been great for Twitter’s business. More must-read stories from Fortune Brainstorm Tech 2019: —A.I.’s hidden biases continue to bedevil businesses. Can they be stopped? —Land O’Lakes CEO: Big data is helping farmers deal with climate swings —How Spotify “playlisting” turned an unknown artist into a star —U.S. risks falling behind in crypto, warns ‘Crypto Mom’ SEC commissioner —Verizon executive calls for federal privacy rules on 5GGet Fortune’s Eye on A.I. newsletter, where artificial intelligence meets industry
17 Jul 19
Fortune
Away, the purveyor of colorful rolling suitcases whose valuation surpassed $1 billion this spring, credits its success to a key decision: Not selling its luggage on [hotlink]Amazon[/hotlink]. “What I am glad we never did and that we’ve avoided so far is being on Amazon,” said Jen Rubio, co-founder and chief brand officer of Away, at Fortune’s Brainstorm Tech conference Tuesday in Aspen, Colo. Away, which is based in New York, sells its products on its own website throughout the U.S., Europe, and several other countries, as well as in brick-and-mortar stores in seven major cities. It has marketed the suitcases aggressively through Facebook and Instagram. But the travel company has eschewed Amazon, a strategic choice that Rubio believes has helped Away solidify its brand. Doing so has created a “moat,” she said, that has set it apart from competitors. “I really do think that you will have brands that you go to because you love the brand or the product, and that’s a differentiator, and everything else is a commodity that you’ll buy on Amazon,” Rubio said. “And I really don’t think there will be a middle space. So I think really just sticking to our guns, and not going on the [Amazon] platform was important for us.” A deal breaker, Rubio added, is the fact that Amazon doesn’t share data about its customers with vendors, meaning Away would be cut off from insights into who buys its products. Customer data is vital to a direct-to-consumer brand like Away, which plans to rely on that connection to consumers and analytics as it expands into other products and markets, she said. “What’s important is that customer relationship for us, and that’s how we’ve been able to build our brand,” Rubio said. Being able to collect customer metrics and analyze them will also help Away make its marketing more targeted, she added. “I know in my heart, and my gut tells me that this will make it easier to advertise on Facebook.” Rubio did, however, leave the door open to potentially partnering with Amazon in the future, under more favorable terms. “Never say never, but we’re committed to not going on Amazon with what they’ve offered us now,” she said. “Obviously it’s a massive platform with a lot of customers, but we’re not going to go on there as a wholesale brand.” More must-read stories from Fortune Brainstorm Tech 2019: —A.I.’s hidden biases continue to bedevil businesses. Can they be stopped? —Land O’Lakes CEO: Big data is helping farmers deal with climate swings —How Spotify “playlisting” turned an unknown artist into a star —U.S. risks falling behind in crypto, warns ‘Crypto Mom’ SEC commissioner —Verizon executive calls for federal privacy rules on 5G Get Fortune’s Eye on A.I. newsletter, where artificial intelligence meets industry
16 Jul 19
BCNN1 WP

Early Facebook investor and Trump supporter Peter Thiel weighed in on the Democrats taking on the president in 2020. “I’m most scared by Elizabeth Warren,” he said on Monday on Fox News’ “Tucker Carlson Tonight.” “She’s the one that’s actually talking about the economy, which is the thing that matters most,” Thiel told Carlson. He said the […]

16 Jul 19
Fortune
Intel was too ambitious in trying to create a better class of processors in recent years, leading to major delays that have created an opportunity for competitors to grab more of the market for PC chips, the company’s new CEO acknowledged on Tuesday. Bob Swan, in one of his first public appearances since being named permanent CEO in January, said [hotlink]Intel[/hotlink] wanted to improve its manufacturing process to speed the performance of its chips, as it had done successfully many times previously. But the improvement, first expected to debut as early as 2015 , is now planned for the second half of this year. The delay was “somewhat a function of what we’ve been able to do in the past, which in essence was defying the odds,” Swan said on Tuesday at Fortune’s Brainstorm Tech conference in Aspen, Colo. “At a time when it was getting harder and harder, we set a more and more aggressive goal. From that, it just took us longer.” Swan took over as interim CEO in June 2018, at a difficult time in the chipmaker’s history. Though still dominating sales of processors for PCs and servers, Intel was struggling to move to the more efficient manufacturing process. Rivals Advanced Micro Devices and Nvidia, which relied on outsourced chip manufacturing that continued to improve, leapfrogged ahead. Intel’s stock has barely budged since Swan was named CEO at the end of January and is up only 6% for all of this year. By contrast, AMD’s shares have gained 83% in 2019 and Nvidia is up 25%. Prior CEO Brian Krzanich resigned in June 2018, after the company said it discovered he had a past “consensual relationship” with an Intel employee. After a seven-month search, in January, Intel’s board selected Swan as the CEO—only the seventh in the company’s 50-year history. The new CEO, who was initially named interim when Krzanich left, has also been credited with improving morale at Intel. After finally getting the manufacturing delays out of the way, Swan says he set about improving the company’s culture. “The short story is we learned from it,” Swan said. The next generation of manufacturing improvements will be ready in about two years, he said. Intel is internally emphasizing greater sharing of information between units. The goal is to “pull entire company together” through “more truth and transparency and the free flow of information, Swan said. More must-read stories from Fortune Brainstorm Tech 2019: —A.I.’s hidden biases continue to bedevil businesses. Can they be stopped? —Land O’Lakes CEO: Big data is helping farmers deal with climate swings —How Spotify “playlisting” turned an unknown artist into a star —U.S. risks falling behind in crypto, warns ‘Crypto Mom’ SEC commissioner —Verizon executive calls for federal privacy rules on 5G Get Fortune’s Eye on A.I. newsletter, where artificial intelligence meets industry
16 Jul 19
Fortune
Apple plans to fund original podcasts that would be exclusive to its audio service, according to people familiar with the matter, increasing its investment in the industry to keep competitors Spotify and Stitcher at bay. Executives at the company have reached out to media companies and their representatives to discuss buying exclusive rights to podcasts, according to the people, who asked not to be identified because the conversations are preliminary. [hotlink]Apple[/hotlink] has yet to outline a clear strategy, but has said it plans to pursue the kind of deals it didn’t make before. Apple all but invented the podcasting business with the creation of a network that collects thousands of podcasts from across the internet in a feed on people’s phones, smartwatches, and computers. The Apple Podcast app still accounts for anywhere from 50% to 70% of listening for most podcasts, according to industry executives. The news sent shares of Spotify down as much as 2.7% to $150.09 in New York on Tuesday, marking the biggest intraday decline in three weeks. The stock had been up 36% this year through Monday’s close. After years without making substantial changes to its podcasting business, which first launched in 2005, Apple has recently focused on upgrading its app and has added new tools for podcast makers. Still, new entrants have encroached on Apple’s once-indomitable position, attracting new users by offering exclusive access to original podcasts. A representative for Cupertino, Calif.-based Apple declined to comment. Podcasts App Apple launched Podcast Analytics last year, rolling out a service that gives podcast makers more insight into their listeners and performance. This year, Apple announced a dedicated Podcasts app for Mac computers and launched a web interface to expand the amount of people who can listen to podcasts through its service. Apple placed executive Oliver Schusser in charge of podcasts and music, with Ben Cave helping oversee the podcasting strategy. “You are nowhere in podcasting if you don’t have shows listed in Apple podcasts,” said Lex Friedman, the chief revenue officer of Art19, which provides services to podcast producers such as Wondery Media and Tribune. But given all of the recent activity by its competition, “it would surprise me if Apple didn’t do anything with exclusives.” Video Service Apple has refrained from funding podcasts thus far to avoid the perception of playing favorites. But the tech giant has evinced an interest in funding some of the programming it distributes. The company is producing dozens of original TV shows and movies for a new video service called Apple TV+. The first of those series will debut later this year. Spotify Technology, already Apple’s largest rival in paid music streaming, has spent about $400 million acquiring podcast companies. It’s also funded original shows from comedian Amy Schumer, journalist Jemele Hill, and hip-hop artist Joe Budden. Earlier this year, it announced a deal to host podcasts from a company founded by former President Barack Obama and his wife Michelle. These moves have established Spotify as the clear No. 2 player in podcasting, according to industry executives. The company has seized between 10% and 20% of listeners, and accounts for half of the audience on some shows. Other companies, including IHeartMedia, Stitcher, Pandora, and Luminary, have also devoted more resources to the medium. Apple is in the midst of building a suite of media services across audio and video that tether people to its phones and other devices. Podcasting is still a small business compared with music or TV. Podcasting companies generated $479 million in advertising sales in the U.S. last year, according to the Interactive Advertising Bureau. Growing Fast But the industry has been growing. Sales have grown 65% a year for the past three years, according to the IAB, while the number of monthly listeners to podcasts has doubled over the past five years. Still, Apple doesn’t make its own money off of the Podcasts app. It doesn’t charge for the software or run its own advertising. However, growing the Podcasts app and adding exclusives could give some consumers another reason to stick to their iPhone or subscribe to complementary paid services like Apple Music. Apple also has an advertising division focused on ads in the App Store, which theoretically could eventually be applied to Podcasts if it continues to increase its user base. More must-read stories from Fortune: —The fall and rise of VR: The struggle to make virtual reality get real —A new A.I. is running the table against poker pros. Is business strategy next? —Video game addiction: These are the warning signs to look out for —Apple has new MacBooks. Here’s what you need to know —Listen to our new audio briefing, Fortune 500 DailyCatch up with Data Sheet, Fortune‘s daily digest on the business of tech.
16 Jul 19
Fortune
The tech industry is awaiting the next billion people to come online so it can sell them their latest innovations or bombard them with ads.  But, as GGV Capital managing partner Hans Tung explained on Tuesday at the annual Fortune Brainstorm Tech conference in Aspen, Colo., many of those people will come from the emerging world. “A lot of growth is coming from smartphones,” Tung said. “And if you look at where smartphone users are coming from, three places stand out.” India, Latin American (largely Brazil), and Southeast Asia (especially Indonesia) are expected to be hotspots of online growth. Sao Paolo, Bogota, Mexico City, Jakarta, and New Delhi will be the new San Francisco, Seattle, and New York. Yet, the very places primed for growth are largely being ignored by the tech industry. “You look at some of these other emerging markets where the next billion users are coming from, they’re still underinvested,” Tung said. The growth, along with the business opportunity, will be mostly younger users. “They grew up on iPads,” Tung said. “They grew up listening to Spotify. They grew up looking at YouTube. They spend more time on YouTube than all the TV time I ever spent in my life.” More must-read stories from Fortune Brainstorm Tech 2019: —A.I.’s hidden biases continue to bedevil businesses. Can they be stopped? —Land O’Lakes CEO: Big data is helping farmers deal with climate swings —How Spotify “playlisting” turned an unknown artist into a star —U.S. risks falling behind in crypto, warns ‘Crypto Mom’ SEC commissioner —Verizon executive calls for federal privacy rules on 5G Get Fortune’s Eye on A.I. newsletter, where artificial intelligence meets industry