Aaron Kosminski

01 Jul 19
Earth and Skye

I’ve been hearing about Jack the Ripper for as long as I can remember. I always knew that there were many different theories surrounding who, what, why… but nothing is truly known. So, I thought it might be about time to read a little more about this infamous serial killer. Especially since I have a few books based around him and I really wasn’t quite adding up the hints and information that was found in some of the short stories I’ve been reading.

30 Jun 19
Midnight Theater Presents

Okay a classic of horror, bizarre, weird and the unusual. Saucy Jack killed 5 prostitutes in the east side of London from August of 1888 through November of 1888. He taunted police. The sent letters to the newspapers bragging. He got away with it and disappeared. Or did he? The classic “Who Done It”. One […]

19 Jun 19
News Archives Uk

Jack the Ripper, from author Lewis Carroll to Liverpool cotton salesman James Maybrick, the perpetrator of the grisly crimes that Victorian London has never been identified. Now, one of the case's first suspects is back in the news. ace Smithsonian reports, Aaron Kosminski, a barber from Poland, has been linked to the Jack the Ripper […]

14 Jun 19
practicejack

I am an avid amateur Ripperologist. I have watched numerous documentaries about the subject. Read almost every book published about the topic in the past 30 years (and even a few older ones). Reviewed hours and hours of material online about the subject. I have seen many theories about the ‘true identity’ of the Ripper, […]

25 May 19
Russia News Now

Home » Crimes, Eurabia, Europe » Kebab seller accused of Killing and Eating Little Girl says “I don’t care whether she’s alive or dead”     A kebab shop owner charged with disposing of Charlene Downes’ body has sensationally claimed he doesn’t care ‘whether she’s alive or dead’ in his first ever on-camera interview. Iranian […]

25 Apr 19
Call Me Stormy

Following much absurd and thorough investigation, the centuries-old Jack The Ripper cold case may have finally been solved. Following a new DNA test performed on a shawl belonging to one of The Ripper’s alleged victims, the evidence points to Aaron Kosminski, who immigrated to East London from Poland in the 1880s and worked in the […]

22 Apr 19
PattayaToday

In terms of mysteries of the criminal world, and the “Who done it?” question that eclipses all others, there is nothing more mysterious then who was Jack the Ripper. You might have seen countless movies on the subject, read myriad books on the topic, or listened to a plethora of online sleuths that think they […]

15 Apr 19
All Things Thriller

  He may have left Poland because of persecution. It was tough to be Jewish in the latter part of the 19th Century, especially in Eastern Europe and its bordering areas of Central Europe. There were lots of tensions. To boil things down to the skeletal remains, a burgeoning movement of the moment was catching […]

11 Apr 19
A Writer's Existence

                Everybody who wasn’t raised in a cave has heard of Jack The Ripper. He is without a doubt the most famous serial killer of all time. Countless references to him in newspapers, books, TV, and movies have made this guy infamous to us all. However, what do you really know about him and his […]

04 Apr 19
The Irish Sun
THIRTY-NINE stab wounds punctured Martha Tabram’s breasts and genitals when her lifeless body was found outside an apartment block in Whitechapel, London. It was a crime that left police puzzled for over 130 years – Martha, a prostitute, had been brutally murdered – but who had committed such a terrible crime, and why? Emilia Fox, star of Silkent Witness, turns real life detective in the show Now, a brand new BBC documentary – fronted by Silent Witness star Emilia Fox – has used modern detective techniques to reinvestigate and concluded that Martha was “beyond all doubt” the first victim of notorious serial killer, Jack the Ripper. Jack The Ripper: The Case Reopened, which airs tonight on BBC One, also uses Geo-profiling to confirm Ripper’s identity as Polish barber Aaron Kosminski, named in a DNA study last week. Martha Tabram was murdered on August 7 1888 Forced to sell sex – then killed On the night of August 7, 1888, prostitute Martha Tabram was out drinking with a friend, known as Pearly Poll, when they met a couple of soldiers. The mum-of-two had fallen on hard times since splitting from her husband and had been forced to sell sex to make ends meet. At 11.45pm, Martha left with the soldier and was seen entering George Yard Buildings in London’s Whitechapel. Victims Polly Nichols, Annie Chapman and Liz Stride has been assumed to be the first three The following morning, at 5am, a labourer found her body at the foot of his apartment building. She had been stabbed 39 times in the breasts and genitals. Although Martha was murdered just three weeks before Jack the Ripper started his infamous Whitechapel killing spree,  the 39-year-old was never counted as one of the five known victims… until now. Four months of murder Between August and November, 1888, Martha and five other women were murdered on the streets of Whitechapel. As the killing spree progressed, each body was found more mutilated than the last as the killer cut off body parts and disembowelled his victims for sexual kicks. Using detailed notes from the investigation at the time Emilia and criminologist Professor David Wilson recreate the crime scenes to gain a greater understanding of the killer’s methods. Experts also use a digital autopsy table – high-tech equipment which allows investigators to see internal organs of a woman’s body and draw wounds onto the image – to detail the horrific injuries inflicted on the victims. Emilia Fox with the digital autopsy table used to show police and juries injuries inflicted on victims The Ripper’s next victim, Polly Nichols, was found dead at 3.40am on Friday 31 August in Buck’s Row. Her throat had been cut with a knife penetrating as far as her backbone – then her abdomen was “carved” open and her genitals were stabbed in what Prof Wilson deemed “a sexualised act” of “overkill”. “He’s used far more force than is necessary to kill the victim,” he explains. “Once he’s killed her, that’s only the beginning. There’s things that he’s trying to achieve by the death of this woman.” The Ripper victims and photographs from the autopsies Hi next victim, Annie Chapman, was seen going into 29 Hanbury Street at 5am on Saturday September 8, with man a witness later described as “shabby genteel”. She was found dead an hour later. Her throat had been cut, the abdomen had been slashed entirely open and her uterus had been removed. A map of Whitechapel showing the sites of the six murders and Kosminski’s home On the early hours of Sunday September 30, Liz Stride had her throat cut in Dutfield’s yard but it’s thought the killer was interrupted because she was not mutilated. Israel Schwartz, who saw the Ripper attack Stride but dismissed it as a domestic, described the man as “30 years old, about 5ft 5in, fair complexion, dark hair with a brown moustache… wearing a dark jacket with a black peaked cap.” ‘Sexual frustration leads to second murder in a day’ The same morning, Catherine Eddowes was murdered in Mitre Square. Her throat was cut, her abdomen was ripped open by a long, deep, jagged wound and the left kidney and the major part of the uterus had been removed. Her bowel was draped over her shoulder and for the first time he attacked the face – cutting both eyelids, cutting the nose and slashing around the mouth. Prof Wilson concluded that having to leave Stride’s body without mutilation had left the Ripper’s blood lust unsatisfied. Catherine Eddowes was killed and mutilate in Mitre Square “He’s sexually frustrated so he runs off in search of another victim,” he said. “He’s not simply interested in killing. He kills Liz Stride but it’s not enough for him. If he was only interested in killing he’d have gone home. “But this is about his own misogynistic sexual needs after the woman has died.” Witness Joseph Lawende saw Eddowes talking to a man of “30, 5ft 7in, a fair complexion and a small fair moustache.” This time, he was wearing a salt and pepper jacket, a red neckerchief and a grey peaked cap – suggesting he may have changed his outfit between the two attacks. ‘Breasts and kidneys on the table, face obliterated and the heart missing’ The final victim, Mary Jane Kelly, was the only one killed in her room and the Ripper’s sick fantasies came to the fore. Her throat had been severed to the spine, then her organs were cut out from her body and arranged around the room, with her breasts and kidneys placed on the table next to the bed. Her heart was missing and her face was “gashed in all directions” with her nose, cheeks, eyebrows and ears partially removed. “Alone in the room, he’s got time to be with a dead victim,” said David. “Here he is exploring, he is allowing his fantasies to be fully flowered. A newspaper illustration of the Polly Nichols murder scene “When he’s got time to be alone with a dead woman he disfigures, he dehumanises, he obliterates.” Having gathered all the information on the dead women, the pair turn to a computer system called HOLMES (Home Office Large Major Enquiry System) set up in the wake of the Yorkshire Ripper murders to help police establish a pattern in serial murders. Inputting the details of 11 murders in the Whitechapel area in 1888, the computer rules out five that don’t fit the pattern, but concludes that Martha Tabram’s death fits. “Having walked the streets of Whitechapel…having looked at the MO and in particular having seen the evidence presented from HOLMES I’ve got absolutely no doubt that Martha Tabram is the first of the Jack the Ripper victims,” concludes Prof Wilson. Emilia investigates a crime scene in Silent Witness The find helps to narrow down the suspects through Geo-profiling  – establishing where a killer is most likely to live through looking at the sites of their crimes. Expert Dr Sam Lundegran reveals killers are either commuters or marauders, travelling away from home to commit crimes or striking in a pattern around their own homes, leaving a “buffer zone” to distance themselves. Serial killers fall into the marauding pattern 85-90 per cent of the time and the first murder, Prof Wilson says, is most likely to be close to home because the killer “wouldn’t know what to expect” and would need to get to a place of safety quickly. The Geo-profiling identifies a small area of Whitechapel, in the centre of the six murder sites, where the killer is likely to live. ‘The Prince, the painter and the doctor’ Professor Wilson is then able to dismiss the many theories surrounding the identity of the killer – including speculation that the Ripper was Prince Albert Victor, Queen Victoria’s grandson. The Prince – known as Eddy – was thought to have caught syphilis in the navy which turned him into a psychopath. One theory had Prince Albert Victor as a suspect but Prof Wilson discounted him “The problem with that is that the Eddy had an alibi,” says Prof Wilson. “He’s not actually in London when several of the murders occur. The night of the double murder, Queen Victoria notes in her diary that she has been having lunch with ‘Eddy’ in Balmoral.” Painter Walter Sickert, who was suspected because of his obsession with the murders and a series of paintings depicting the scenes, was also ruled out because he was on holiday in France and painted one of his most famous paintings, the October Sun, while some of the murders were taking place. James Maybrick, who apparently claimed to be the Ripper in a diary that “emerged” in 1992, was discounted because tests exposed the diary as a fake. Frances Tumblety’s unusual appearance rules him out of the case Frances Tumblety – a doctor from the US  who lived in Whitechapel – was also suspected. Emilia Fox said: “He was later charged with gross indecency after having sex with five different men. He undoubtedly hates women. He collected uteruses as grotesque specimens.” But Prof Wilson explained: “He has a striking appearance – he’s tall, he has a huge handlebar moustache and crucially he speaks with an American accent. “Neither of the two witnesses mentioned any of these characteristic.” [bc_video video_id=”6022390999001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”BBC documentary uses a digital autopsy table to investigate Jack the Ripper murders”] Instead, Prof Wilson identifies Polish immigrant Aaron Kosminski, who moved to Whitechapel in the early 1880s and worked as a hairdresser. Aaron, who was in his mid-twenties, lived with his brother and sister in Sion Square, in the centre of the murder sites. Medical records say he suffered from mental health issues from 1885, becoming paranoid. “He heard voices and he would later claim that those voices made him behave in a particularly violent way,” David revealed. Aaron Kosminski is named as the most likely to be the serial killer Living so close meant he had time to go home, change and wash on the day of the double murder – explaining the different clothing described by the two witnesses. After the Kelly murder, Kosminski was questioned in house to house enquiries and police began to watch him, informally, which may explain the fact that he never murdered again. In 1890, his family put him in a workhouse infirmary because he was attacking his sister with a knife. He was then moved through various asylums and died of gangrene in 1919. “He lives in Whitechapel, he’s somebody who can blend into the background and has a history of violence,” said Prof Wilson. “He fits all our cold case criteria.” Emilia concludes: “At the end of our cold case review we feel confident that with the help of new technology, we have shed new light on the case of Jack the Ripper.” Jack the Ripper: The Case Reopened airs tonight on BBC1 at 9pm.
04 Apr 19
The Scottish Sun
THIRTY-NINE stab wounds punctured Martha Tabram’s breasts and genitals when her lifeless body was found outside an apartment block in Whitechapel, London. It was a crime that left police puzzled for over 130 years – Martha, a prostitute, had been brutally murdered – but who had committed such a terrible crime, and why? Emilia Fox, star of Silkent Witness, turns real life detective in the show Now, a brand new BBC documentary – fronted by Silent Witness star Emilia Fox – has used modern detective techniques to reinvestigate and concluded that Martha was “beyond all doubt” the first victim of notorious serial killer, Jack the Ripper. Jack The Ripper: The Case Reopened, which airs tonight on BBC One, also uses Geo-profiling to confirm Ripper’s identity as Polish barber Aaron Kosminski, named in a DNA study last week. Martha Tabram was murdered on August 7 1888 Forced to sell sex – then killed On the night of August 7, 1888, prostitute Martha Tabram was out drinking with a friend, known as Pearly Poll, when they met a couple of soldiers. The mum-of-two had fallen on hard times since splitting from her husband and had been forced to sell sex to make ends meet. At 11.45pm, Martha left with the soldier and was seen entering George Yard Buildings in London’s Whitechapel. Victims Polly Nichols, Annie Chapman and Liz Stride has been assumed to be the first three The following morning, at 5am, a labourer found her body at the foot of his apartment building. She had been stabbed 39 times in the breasts and genitals. Although Martha was murdered just three weeks before Jack the Ripper started his infamous Whitechapel killing spree,  the 39-year-old was never counted as one of the five known victims… until now. Four months of murder Between August and November, 1888, Martha and five other women were murdered on the streets of Whitechapel. As the killing spree progressed, each body was found more mutilated than the last as the killer cut off body parts and disembowelled his victims for sexual kicks. Using detailed notes from the investigation at the time Emilia and criminologist Professor David Wilson recreate the crime scenes to gain a greater understanding of the killer’s methods. Experts also use a digital autopsy table – high-tech equipment which allows investigators to see internal organs of a woman’s body and draw wounds onto the image – to detail the horrific injuries inflicted on the victims. Emilia Fox with the digital autopsy table used to show police and juries injuries inflicted on victims The Ripper’s next victim, Polly Nichols, was found dead at 3.40am on Friday 31 August in Buck’s Row. Her throat had been cut with a knife penetrating as far as her backbone – then her abdomen was “carved” open and her genitals were stabbed in what Prof Wilson deemed “a sexualised act” of “overkill”. “He’s used far more force than is necessary to kill the victim,” he explains. “Once he’s killed her, that’s only the beginning. There’s things that he’s trying to achieve by the death of this woman.” The Ripper victims and photographs from the autopsies Hi next victim, Annie Chapman, was seen going into 29 Hanbury Street at 5am on Saturday September 8, with man a witness later described as “shabby genteel”. She was found dead an hour later. Her throat had been cut, the abdomen had been slashed entirely open and her uterus had been removed. A map of Whitechapel showing the sites of the six murders and Kosminski’s home On the early hours of Sunday September 30, Liz Stride had her throat cut in Dutfield’s yard but it’s thought the killer was interrupted because she was not mutilated. Israel Schwartz, who saw the Ripper attack Stride but dismissed it as a domestic, described the man as “30 years old, about 5ft 5in, fair complexion, dark hair with a brown moustache… wearing a dark jacket with a black peaked cap.” ‘Sexual frustration leads to second murder in a day’ The same morning, Catherine Eddowes was murdered in Mitre Square. Her throat was cut, her abdomen was ripped open by a long, deep, jagged wound and the left kidney and the major part of the uterus had been removed. Her bowel was draped over her shoulder and for the first time he attacked the face – cutting both eyelids, cutting the nose and slashing around the mouth. Prof Wilson concluded that having to leave Stride’s body without mutilation had left the Ripper’s blood lust unsatisfied. Catherine Eddowes was killed and mutilate in Mitre Square “He’s sexually frustrated so he runs off in search of another victim,” he said. “He’s not simply interested in killing. He kills Liz Stride but it’s not enough for him. If he was only interested in killing he’d have gone home. “But this is about his own misogynistic sexual needs after the woman has died.” Witness Joseph Lawende saw Eddowes talking to a man of “30, 5ft 7in, a fair complexion and a small fair moustache.” This time, he was wearing a salt and pepper jacket, a red neckerchief and a grey peaked cap – suggesting he may have changed his outfit between the two attacks. ‘Breasts and kidneys on the table, face obliterated and the heart missing’ The final victim, Mary Jane Kelly, was the only one killed in her room and the Ripper’s sick fantasies came to the fore. Her throat had been severed to the spine, then her organs were cut out from her body and arranged around the room, with her breasts and kidneys placed on the table next to the bed. Her heart was missing and her face was “gashed in all directions” with her nose, cheeks, eyebrows and ears partially removed. “Alone in the room, he’s got time to be with a dead victim,” said David. “Here he is exploring, he is allowing his fantasies to be fully flowered. A newspaper illustration of the Polly Nichols murder scene “When he’s got time to be alone with a dead woman he disfigures, he dehumanises, he obliterates.” Having gathered all the information on the dead women, the pair turn to a computer system called HOLMES (Home Office Large Major Enquiry System) set up in the wake of the Yorkshire Ripper murders to help police establish a pattern in serial murders. Inputting the details of 11 murders in the Whitechapel area in 1888, the computer rules out five that don’t fit the pattern, but concludes that Martha Tabram’s death fits. “Having walked the streets of Whitechapel…having looked at the MO and in particular having seen the evidence presented from HOLMES I’ve got absolutely no doubt that Martha Tabram is the first of the Jack the Ripper victims,” concludes Prof Wilson. Emilia investigates a crime scene in Silent Witness The find helps to narrow down the suspects through Geo-profiling  – establishing where a killer is most likely to live through looking at the sites of their crimes. Expert Dr Sam Lundegran reveals killers are either commuters or marauders, travelling away from home to commit crimes or striking in a pattern around their own homes, leaving a “buffer zone” to distance themselves. Serial killers fall into the marauding pattern 85-90 per cent of the time and the first murder, Prof Wilson says, is most likely to be close to home because the killer “wouldn’t know what to expect” and would need to get to a place of safety quickly. The Geo-profiling identifies a small area of Whitechapel, in the centre of the six murder sites, where the killer is likely to live. ‘The Prince, the painter and the doctor’ Professor Wilson is then able to dismiss the many theories surrounding the identity of the killer – including speculation that the Ripper was Prince Albert Victor, Queen Victoria’s grandson. The Prince – known as Eddy – was thought to have caught syphilis in the navy which turned him into a psychopath. One theory had Prince Albert Victor as a suspect but Prof Wilson discounted him “The problem with that is that the Eddy had an alibi,” says Prof Wilson. “He’s not actually in London when several of the murders occur. The night of the double murder, Queen Victoria notes in her diary that she has been having lunch with ‘Eddy’ in Balmoral.” Painter Walter Sickert, who was suspected because of his obsession with the murders and a series of paintings depicting the scenes, was also ruled out because he was on holiday in France and painted one of his most famous paintings, the October Sun, while some of the murders were taking place. James Maybrick, who apparently claimed to be the Ripper in a diary that “emerged” in 1992, was discounted because tests exposed the diary as a fake. Frances Tumblety’s unusual appearance rules him out of the case Frances Tumblety – a doctor from the US  who lived in Whitechapel – was also suspected. Emilia Fox said: “He was later charged with gross indecency after having sex with five different men. He undoubtedly hates women. He collected uteruses as grotesque specimens.” But Prof Wilson explained: “He has a striking appearance – he’s tall, he has a huge handlebar moustache and crucially he speaks with an American accent. “Neither of the two witnesses mentioned any of these characteristic.” [bc_video video_id=”6022390999001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”BBC documentary uses a digital autopsy table to investigate Jack the Ripper murders”] Instead, Prof Wilson identifies Polish immigrant Aaron Kosminski, who moved to Whitechapel in the early 1880s and worked as a hairdresser. Aaron, who was in his mid-twenties, lived with his brother and sister in Sion Square, in the centre of the murder sites. Medical records say he suffered from mental health issues from 1885, becoming paranoid. “He heard voices and he would later claim that those voices made him behave in a particularly violent way,” David revealed. Aaron Kosminski is named as the most likely to be the serial killer Living so close meant he had time to go home, change and wash on the day of the double murder – explaining the different clothing described by the two witnesses. After the Kelly murder, Kosminski was questioned in house to house enquiries and police began to watch him, informally, which may explain the fact that he never murdered again. In 1890, his family put him in a workhouse infirmary because he was attacking his sister with a knife. He was then moved through various asylums and died of gangrene in 1919. “He lives in Whitechapel, he’s somebody who can blend into the background and has a history of violence,” said Prof Wilson. “He fits all our cold case criteria.” Emilia concludes: “At the end of our cold case review we feel confident that with the help of new technology, we have shed new light on the case of Jack the Ripper.” Jack the Ripper: The Case Reopened airs tonight on BBC1 at 9pm.
04 Apr 19
Metro
What will Emilia Fox uncover about Jack the Ripper in The Case Reopened? (Picture: BBC) One of the most notorious serial killers of all time is about to be examined once again in the BBC One documentary Jack The Ripper: The Case Reopened. Thursday night’s documentary, fronted by Silent Witness’s Emilia Fox, uses new technology to try and deduce the identity of the murderer, who left a trail of terror through London’s Whitechapel between August and November 1888. It’s set to be compelling – but what time is it on? Here’s what you need to know. What time is Jack The Ripper: The Case Reopened on BBC One tonight? The one-hour documentary kicks off at 9pm. It’s on right after BBC One’s new show Celebrity Painting Challenge, so make sure to set those reminders if you want to tune in. The actress will use new technology to try and figure out Jack’s identity (Picture: BBC) If you do miss out, you’ll be able to catch up with it on BBC iPlayer. Who was Jack The Ripper? He was a serial killer who preyed on women in Whitechapel, East London, in the latter part of 1888 – claiming at least five known victims, although the total may have been higher. Nobody was ever caught or convicted of the murders, and speculation over who he might have been continues to this day, with scientists claiming earlier this month that evidence points to him having been a Polish barber named Aaron Kosminski. Jack The Ripper claimed at least five female victims around Whitechapel in 1888 (Picture: Getty Images) Aaron, who was 23 at the time, was previously suggested as the killer back in 2014 following fresh DNA tests on blood and semen found on the shawl of one of his victims, Catherine Eddowes. Despite these suggestions though, his true identity still remains a mystery. Who else appears with Emilia Fox on Jack The Ripper: The Case Reopened? The actress appears on the show alongside Professor Of Criminology David Wilson as they examine the case. They will use modern technology in a bid to try and work out just who Jack The Ripper was as well as looking into his possible motives. [metro-fact-box id=”7022752″ title=”Got a showbiz story?” icon=”exclamation” /]  
04 Apr 19
Metro
It’s among the most infamous crimes ever (Picture: Stefano Bianchetti/Corbis via Getty Images) Tonight, BBC One will be airing Jack The Ripper: The Case Reopened, using modern technology to try and unearth the identity of one of the most infamous serial killers in history. Emilia Fox will be hosting the show, trying to work out the murderer’s motivations, and digging deep into why the case was never solved. Over the years there have been countless theories on who ‘Gentleman Jack’ could be, but with no conviction then or since, it’s hard to come to a concrete conclusion. In the run-up to the documentary, however, let’s take a look at those theories, as well as the suspects that aroused the most suspicion. The murders Between 1888 and 1891, six women were killed in the Whitechapel area of London, and attributed to a killer known as Jack The Ripper. They were Mary Ann Nichols, Annie Chapman, Elizabeth Stride, Catherine Eddowes, and Mary Jane Kelly (known as the five canonical murders, as they were all formally linked). The murders themselves were extremely gruesome, bearing the same hallmarks of abdominal and genital mutilation and organ removal. They also all lacked an obvious motive, and the killer typically targeted female sex workers. They also had a pattern, favouring killings around weekends and public holidays and within a few streets of each other. This led people to believe that the killer may have had surgical knowledge (although this is debated) or that they could have been trained in butchery. Similarly, this pattern indicated they may have been in regular employment and lived locally (although one theory persists that they were an educated upper-class man who went to Whitechapel specifically to kill). Over 100 suspects remain named in the case, and it would be impossible to list them all. However, here are some of the more prominent ones who’ve been posited over the years. Montague John Druitt (Picture: Wikimedia Commons) The five canonical murders took place in a short space of time – between August and November 1888. Not long the abrupt killings, the barrister was found dead in the Thames with a reported suicide note. In this note, he allegedly claimed to be going insane, and felt it was better for him to die. Police at the time linked the fact that Druitt’s family were surgeons, and came up with the theory that he may have committed the murders and taken him life afterwards. Detective, Sir Melville McNaghten, later wrote that he ‘had little doubt, his own family felt him to have been the murderer’. However, Inspector Frederick Abberline dismissed Druitt as a serious suspect due to the lack of hard evidence and the fact he was not local to Whitechapel. Aaron Kominski The 1894 memorandum written by Sir Melville Macnaghten, naming “Kosminski” as one of three suspects in the Jack the Ripper case (Picture: Wikimedia Commons) Russian Kominski was also named by McNaghten as a possible suspect, something which was backed up by others later. A handwritten footnote written by Chief Inspector Donald Swanson in Assistant Commissioner Sir Robert Anderson’s memoirs bore the man’s name, which was then investigated later by author Martin Fido in the 1980s. Looking back through records of those who lived in asylums at the time, there was only one Kominski; Aaron. He was also a Whitechapel resident. He was linked mostly due to his age at the time of the murders and the fact he had reported ‘homicidal tendencies’. In 2007, his DNA was then extracted from a piece of a shawl found near Catherine Eddowes’ body, although the legitimacy of this was widely questioned. Frances Craig In 2015, Dr. Wynne Weston-Davies wrote a book claiming his great-aunt Elizabeth Weston-Davies was actually Mary Jane Kelly (the last canonical victim of Jack The Ripper). In his book, the former surgeon stated that Elizabeth’s husband, Francis Craig was behind the identity of Jack The Ripper, and that he has committed the previous four in efforts to cover up that of his wife. The book reports that Francis, who lived in Whitechapel at the time and worked as a reporter, found out that his wife had been involved in sex work. She then apparently changed her name and went into hiding, but was unfortunately found and killed. Weston-Davies also claims that Craig faked the famous ‘From Hell’ letters in his own editorial style. Since none of these theories can ever be confirmed, they officially remain the stuff of conspiracy. That said, perhaps this new show can unearth something that no one ever has before. The documentary airs on BBC One on Thursday night at 9pm. [metro-link url=”https://metro.co.uk/2019/04/03/people-rather-no-deal-remain-according-new-poll-9105738/” title=”Most people would rather have no-deal over remain, according to new poll”] [metro-link url=”https://metro.co.uk/2019/04/03/judge-tells-rapist-uber-driver-knock-off-sobs-court-hearing-9105415/” title=”Judge tells ‘rapist’ Uber driver ‘Knock it off!’ as he sobs during court hearing”]
20 Mar 19
Calico Mag

Who is Jack the Ripper? A butcher, a surgeon, a doctor, an undertaker, a Polish Jewish hairdresser, the grandson of Queen Victoria … We heard everything about the identity of the famous and mysterious “Jack the Ripper”. In, eighteen hundred and eighty-eight, a series of murders took place in the district of Whitechapel, in the […]

20 Mar 19
Calico Mag

Who is Jack the Ripper? A butcher, a surgeon, a doctor, an undertaker, a Polish Jewish hairdresser, the grandson of Queen Victoria … We heard everything about the identity of the famous and mysterious “Jack the Ripper”. In, eighteen hundred and eighty-eight, a series of murders took place in the district of Whitechapel, in the […]