Activism

22 Apr 19
Daniel's Reading Diary

On the webpage of author Noviolet Bulawayo, there is a quote from Chinua Achebe “Let no one be fooled by the fact that we may write in English, for we intend to do unheard of things with it.” This is apt, Bulawayo writes in the voice of her childhood in Zimbabwe, it is 2008, the […]

22 Apr 19
Nonprofit Chronicles

“Universities,” says Harvard, “have a special role and special responsibility to confront the global challenges of climate change and sustainability.” Indeed they do. But by financing the exploration and production of fossil fuels, Harvard is failing to live up to that responsibility. In an effort to hold the university accountable, a group of prominent alumni, led by former […]

22 Apr 19
The Penenberg Post

I’m always conflicted when I see big corporations expressing an opinion on a controversial issue. On the one hand, it has nothing to do with them and is hardly their place, kind of like when white people attend a Black Lives Matter march. Let the people affected by the issue be the focus of the […]

22 Apr 19
The Dig

By Vy Nguyen “The future is Female” is the kind of feel-good slogan that you see on baby clothes, satisfying calligraphy Instagram accounts, clean and polished vintage shops around Portland, or a quirky laptop case/ Hydro Flask filled with stickers.

22 Apr 19
Archy Worldys

"At 16, I was a little blonde gymnast who loved each other. But after the accident, I woke up bald, lean and burned., says Julie Bourges. This 22-year-old blue-eyed blonde was burned to the third degree on 40% of her body on February 12, 2013. She was attending the carnival of her high school, near […]

21 Apr 19
F I O N A | L A M

A San Francisco Occupy Wall Street protester addressed the crowd with emotional vigour: “we are here to have a good time”[1]. Although the premise of social movements is to inspire and achieve change, most modern crusades seem content with simply talking, walking, and blaming. Perceiving their ideologies as objectively and undeniably ‘right’, these rebellions assume […]

21 Apr 19
F I O N A | L A M

The era of Web 2.0 has given the world a democratic means to communicate freely through social media. As a new form of online expression, memes provide a means to cope with everyday struggles, express opinion, remix media into a humorous reinterpretation. Within the context of social media and a visual attention economy, memes and […]

21 Apr 19
Robs Emporium

More than five million people have signed a petition against Brexit – but do petitions ever work? …

21 Apr 19
The Denver Post
When she completed the final, bouncy moves in another gymnastics floor routine that helped bring joy and exuberance back to a sport rocked by scandal, UCLA’s Katelyn Ohashi jauntily dropped the mic. It was a gesture that capped the final performance of a college career marked by viral videos of performances she designed to empower women and fight body shaming, powerful athletic displays that helped land repeated national TV appearances. The gymnast nicknamed “the Perfect 10” was in a tie for seventh at the NCAA Championships on Friday in Fort Worth and UCLA, the defending champion, finished third behind Oklahoma and LSU on Saturday. The Sooners scored 198.3375 points, to LSU’s 197.8250 and the Bruins’ 197.5375. Ohashi blew a kiss to the crowd after her floor routine and watched her teammates compete. “We remember why we do it,” Ohashi said (via the Los Angeles Times). “It’s not about the winning, it’s not about the first place, it’s about going out with no regrets, and that’s exactly what we did.” Despite the disappointment of the finish for UCLA, Ohashi leaves secure in the knowledge that she helped restore a sport left reeling by a sexual assault scandal that resulted in the conviction of Larry Nassar, the former USA Gymnastics and Michigan State physician who molested more than 300 women. Ohashi ranked first nationally and scored six perfect 10s in floor exercise this season, with video of her routine drawing more than 117 million views. Ohashi did it with delight, writing in a poem called “Fame” that “Not everyone’s destiny is going to be the same. Set your own goals and make your own fame.” UCLA gymnast Katelyn Ohashi competes during the women’s NCAA Division 1 gymnastics championship Friday, April 19, 2019, in Fort Worth, Texas. “I think I finally have really taken ownership of myself and me as a gymnast,” Ohashi said (via the Associated Press). “It just reminds you that timing is everything. I wouldn’t have been ready for all of this last year. I think this being my last year has set me up for a lot of the things I want to do in my future. I’ve always wanted to have a platform like this. So I think it’s really amazing.” She sends her message with music from artists including Tina Turner, Janet Jackson and Beyoncé as well as Earth Wind & Fire, the Jackson Five and Michael Jackson, but she is well aware that this is the end of the road for her. Like many gymnasts, she has had to overcome physical injuries and issues with food and body image. “I’ve said before, ‘gymnastics is abusive,’ but now I know it’s not the sport that’s abusive — it’s the culture that was created and accepted and normalized,” she told Marie Claire, describing the difference she found in college gymnastics. “It’s not about the gold medal — we’re not trying to go to the Olympics — we know this is it for us. After these four years, gymnastics is over.” She noted that “you can clearly see a difference between us and other teams,” she said of UCLA. “You can still get results without abuse.” Ohashi, a gender studies major who also blogs and write poetry, is ready for the next phase of her life. “People are just starting to realize who I am, and they’re like, ‘Oh no, it can’t be over yet — you’re kidding me!’ ” she told Marie Claire. “But I never would have wished for this to happen any earlier because I wouldn’t have been ready for it. I have grown so, so much and stepped into who I want to be in the future.” That future holds plans for activism around issues such as body, image, mental health and domestic violence. “I’ve been waiting for my platform to get to this point,” she told the magazine, noting that she shares a blog called Behind the Madness with a friend. “I’ve always been sharing this stuff — I just have a lot more ears now.” [related_articles location=”right” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]
21 Apr 19
DEVIKA GIRISH

Fear is not an option: Anand Patwardhan’s essay film traces the pattern of political and sectarian violence across the modern history of India

21 Apr 19
The Cannabis Advocacy

With the legalization of cannabis at the federal level being a major debate in the United States today, it is essential for everyone to be informed of why it would be beneficial for the United States Congress to approve of this legalization. This would be a huge change for America after decades of activism by […]

21 Apr 19
DEVIKA GIRISH

Face off: a conversation about Jordan Peele’s Us and issues of horror, race, class, and criticism itself

21 Apr 19
BLACK-PLOITATION

On Thursday, April 18, 2019, #JusticeForLucca started trending on Twitter after a video of a police officer slamming an unarmed, young Black man’s head into the pavement began surfacing on the Internet. The video captures the exact moment when—after his fellow officer, Lacerra, has already pepper-sprayed Lucca—Officer Krickovich slams Lucca’s head multiple times into the […]

21 Apr 19
Not My (Body) Type

I declared a minor in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies only a few months ago in Fall 2018.  The courses I had taken prior to declaring the WGS minor I did purely out of my own interest for the topics, and having a psychology major and sociology minor allowed me many opportunities to gain knowledge […]