American Crew

16 Jun 19
Sportscar Racing News

United Autosports recorded a hard-earned but well deserved fourth LMP2 class placing courtesy of Filipe Albuquerque, Paul Di Resta and Phil Hanson in the 87th running of the  world-famous Le Mans 24 Hour sportscar endurance race in France today (16 Jun) – claiming Ligier’s best finish for a third consecutive year. The Anglo-American team, contesting the legendary […]

16 Jun 19
Russia News Now

Donate Originally appeared at ZeroHedge The Russian embassy in Syria has slammed CBS News for sending its reporters into Idlib province, which is controlled by the al-Qaeda group Hayat Tahrir al-Sham (HTS), at a moment of a stepped up joint Russian-Syrian aerial assault campaign over the northwestern territory. Over the weekend the embassy tweeted of […]

16 Jun 19
BCNN1 WP

Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman said in remarks published Sunday that the kingdom will not hesitate to confront Iranian threats to its security. He joined the U.S. in accusing its bitter rival Iran of being behind the attacks on two oil tankers traveling near the Strait of Hormuz, a vital trade route for […]

16 Jun 19
National Post

The former NFL star said ‘You’ll get to read all my thoughts and opinions on just about everything’

16 Jun 19
Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group

This paragraph is excerpted from the American Technion Society Facebook page. Professor Avi Schroeder and Dr. Josh Schiffman of the The University of Utah are working with elephants at Utah’s Hogle Zoo on a possible new tool to fight against lung, bone, breast, and other cancers. Dr. Schiffman found that p53, a cancer-suppressing protein, is far more prevalent in […]

16 Jun 19
ThinkProgress
Sen. Tom Cotton (R-AR) isn’t interested in waiting for clearer answers about the confusing details and conflicting accounts of what happened to a pair of tanker vessels in the Gulf of Oman this week. According to Cotton’s watch, it’s time to attack Iran. “Iran for 40 years has engaged in these kinds of attacks, going back to the 1980s, and in fact Ronald Reagan had to re-flag a lot of vessels going through the Persian Gulf and ultimately take military action against Iran in 1988,” Cotton said Sunday on CBS’s Face the Nation. “These unprovoked attacks on commercial shipping warrant a retaliatory military strike.” The comments should come as no surprise. Cotton’s watch broke on “attack Iran day” years ago and he’s never replaced it. The bellicose senator has long been eager to see American weapons blow up parts of the country his interventionist predecessors targeted for a coup almost seventy years ago. And he is far from alone in leaping at the latest tanker explosions as vindication of a conclusion he’d already arrived at long before they occurred. But the very alacrity with which Cotton, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, and President Donald Trump have moved to assert that Iran is definitively behind the tanker incidents should be reason for others to pump the brakes. And experts outside the administration have reservations about the conclusive way this information is being portrayed — not least because there are multiple other international actors who might love to trick the U.S. into attacking Iran. “There are at least three other countries that have the capacity and certainly the motive to frame Iran, or if not to frame Iran at least to exacerbate further tensions with Iran and between Iran and the US,” former CIA officer and Center for Security Studies fellow Paul Pillar told the BBC on Saturday. “I’m referring specifically to Iran’s cross-Gulf rivals, Saudi Arabia and the UAE, and certainly Israel as well. All of those governments have an incentive to keep Iran ostracized, punished, loathed, and to preclude anything that could look like a rapprochement between Washington and Tehran.” In the same interview, Pillar agreed that Iran is the likeliest culprit for the tanker damage, but said the evidence put forth so far “don’t…add up to a conclusive case.” The night-vision footage released by the U.S. shows a vessel consistent with some of those used by the Iranian Revolutionary Guard. It seems to show people aboard that small ship removing some sort of object from the hull of the Kokuka Courageous. But the U.S. assertions that the ship and crew were Iranian military, and that the object was a limpet mine, require at least modest leaps beyond what the publicly available intelligence has proven. The head of the company that runs the Kokuka Courageous has said his ship was not damaged by a static explosive device such as a limpet mine but rather was struck by a missile or torpedo. Pompeo himself has been somewhat more circumspect about leveling accusations at Iran, as National Iranian American Council founder and foreign policy commentator Trita Parsi noted in a column for NBC News. Pompeo attributes the view that Iran definitely attacked the Kokuka this week to a “government assessment” rather than to the intelligence community specifically, Parsi observed. And the Secretary of State’s continued assertion that tanker damage incidents earlier this spring were consistent with Iranian military activity remains dubious at best, with some security experts arguing those explosions were inconsistent with the kinds of attacks they’ve seen on such vessels in their careers. Iran and U.S. officials have also made conflicting claims over who rescued the forty-odd sailors aboard the two tankers damaged this week. Taken together, the details and lingering questions suggest that it’s unwise to make definitive statements about what was done, by whom, and to what end. Cotton has never subscribed to such cautious deliberation when it comes to attacking Iran. His comments Sunday were consistent with the longstanding fascination among right-wing hawks — most prominently John Bolton, who now holds a key White House post and has shown himself willing to massage and manipulate intelligence reports in service of war agendas in the past — have held with renewing open military conflict with Iran. “We can make a military response in a time and a manner of our choosing,” Cotton said, “but yes, unprovoked attacks on commercial shipping warrant a retaliatory military strike against the Islamic Republic of Iran.” The war-drums set will need to do better than this to get their way with the international community that would inevitably be dragged into such a conflict. As Pillar noted to the BBC, this particular president faces a substantially higher bar to legitimating use of American military force. “Let’s be honest, the Trump administration has a real credibility problem, particularly with regard to the president himself, who is, to put it bluntly, a serial liar,” Pillar said. “I think it would be very difficult for the U.S. government, with its own output of videos or statements, to produce something that would be sufficient to persuade the rest of the world as to what happened.”
16 Jun 19
TheCritique Archives

The Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia exploits a terrorist attack to condemn Iran, while insisting that no one should condemn him for a murder.

16 Jun 19
Rose Rambles...

Editor’s Note: My, my…what have we here? This is a report generated by American intelligence Media bringing our attention to a substantial case against Mark Zuckerberg, the supposed “genus” who derived Facebook. Isn’t it interesting that the very day the US military ended a very similar project…Facebook was started by Mark? Well, spurned lovers doe […]

16 Jun 19
Yeshiva World News

It was the escalator ride that would change history. Four years ago on Sunday, Donald Trump descended through the pink marble and brass atrium of Trump Tower to announce his candidacy for president , the first step on a journey few believed would take him all the way to the White House. It turns out […]

16 Jun 19
FOX40

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman said in remarks published Sunday that the kingdom will not hesitate to confront Iranian threats to its security. He joined the U.S. in accusing its bitter rival Iran of being behind the attacks on two oil tankers traveling near the Strait of […]

16 Jun 19
Russia News Now

Rodney Shakespeare speaking to Press TV. The recent attacks on two oil tankers near the Persian Gulf were “false-flag attacks” to further target Iran amid heightened tensions between Tehran and Washington. “This was an obvious false-flag attack …. the signs are this is an attempt to blame Iran,” Rodney Shakespeare said in an interview with […]

16 Jun 19
KTLA

Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman said in remarks published Sunday that the kingdom will not hesitate to confront Iranian threats to its security. He joined the U.S. in accusing its bitter rival Iran of being behind the attacks on two oil tankers traveling near the Strait of Hormuz, a vital trade route for […]

16 Jun 19
WTRF
NEW YORK (AP) — It was the escalator ride that would change history. Four years ago on Sunday, Donald Trump descended through the pink marble and brass atrium of Trump Tower to announce his candidacy for president , the first step on a journey few believed would take him all the way to the White House. It turns out the 2015 event might not have happened, at least not on June 16. And the over-the-top staging that featured a crowd including paid actors could have been even more theatrical if one early idea hadn’t been scrapped. (Trump nixed suggestions to feature a live elephant. “Too political,” he decided.) Now, the president who loves to reminisce about that “famous” Trump Tower moment is trying to recreate the magic as he formally launches his re-election bid Tuesday in Florida. Four years in, Trump still is echoing much of the same divisive rhetoric he let fly when he ditched the speech prepared for that original campaign kickoff. His 2015 announcement, according to those involved in the effort, was a classic Trump production aimed at highlighting all the things that made Trump, well, Trump: his brashness, his wealth and his skill for lighting rhetorical fires and watching the press scramble to respond. Trump had been in Europe playing golf the week before his scheduled announcement, with plans to return in time to go over remarks written by his ragtag team of early staffers. “I get a call while he is in Europe and he asked, ‘What do you think about postponing this a little?'” recalled Sam Nunberg, an early campaign adviser. But the press already had been invited, trips to early-voting states planned and the timing — a day after assumed front-runner Jeb Bush’s announcement — seemed ideal. And there was fear among advisers that any delay would trigger talk of cold feet about a campaign some observers doubted would ever happen because Trump had already flirted with, but then bailed on, previous bids. “I tell him, ‘We can’t do that. We have set this date. If we postpone it, it would be covered that you got cold feet and you would not be taken seriously,'” said Nunberg. “I told him that postponing would be like Madonna not performing at MSG on a show day,” referring to New York’s Madison Square Garden. So the show went on. Trump and his wife, Melania, emerged from an upper level of Trump Tower and descended the “famous” escalator, with the future president offering thumbs-ups and waves. It was a scene Trump had carefully crafted, paying frequent visits to the lobby as crews worked through the night to erect press risers, build the stage he would stand on and polish every inch of marble and brass. A speech had been written. But Corey Lewandowski, Trump’s first campaign manager, wrote in his book, “Let Trump Be Trump,” that the candidate “gave a quick look at the sheet of paper Corey handed him, folded it up, and put it in his breast pocket, never to look at it again.” Four years later Trump remembers it fondly. “I never forget standing on the famous escalator, you know the escalator, right?” he likes to tell crowds. “Remember the scene with Melania in front of me waving very elegantly and Trump coming down, waving less elegantly? But I just took a deep breath and I said, ‘Let’s go do it. Let’s make this country great,’ because it takes guts. It takes guts. And I’m so glad I did it.” And four years later, the speech Trump delivered, following an introduction from his eldest daughter, Ivanka, sounds just like one he would deliver today. “Our country is in serious trouble. We don’t have victories anymore,” Trump told the crowd, railing against China for “killing us on trade” and promising to build a “great, great wall” along the U.S.-Mexico border that the American ally would pay for, “Mark my words.” “When Mexico sends its people, they’re not sending their best,” Trump said in one infamous line. He panned Obama-era unemployment statistics as “full of nonsense” and described himself as “really rich.” “He’s doing exactly what he said he was going to do, and as a result of what he said he was going to do, he got elected,” said George Gigicos, who was hired to produce the 2015 event and went on to serve as advance director for both the campaign and at the White House. Trump, said Roger Stone, another longtime adviser, “orchestrated every minute detail of his announcement,” including vetoing a suggestion from his former personal attorney Michael Cohen to decorate the lobby with red, white and blue bunting and feature a live elephant to add to the circus. Trump “decided to come down the escalator and worked from his own handwritten notes rather than a prepared text,” said Stone, insisting that, “then, as now, Donald Trump does not have handlers or managers or chief strategists.” That included scrapping aides’ ideas on what he should wear. “He asked me about a black suit. I said, ‘Yes, that’s iconic, that’s ‘The Apprentice,'” recalled Nunberg. Trump disagreed. “He said, ‘You’re a moron. Blue is better. It works better with the flags.’ He was right.” Trump was thrilled with the speech’s reception and later remarked on how successful the day had been for his brand. “How great is this for Trump?” Nunberg recalled the candidate saying at one point. It helped, of course, that some in the crowd had been paid to be there. Extras were offered $50 to “wear t-shirts and carry signs and help cheer” in support of Trump’s announcement, according to a casting call email obtained by The Hollywood Reporter. The ploy was first discovered by Angelo Carusone, now president of the progressive Media Matters group. Carusone said after the event, he was struck that, at a time of selfie obsession, he couldn’t find anyone who had posted photos of themselves attending the event. “That was weird,” he remembered thinking. “People who care about a presidential press announcement are going to post selfies,” he said. He finally came across a single photo posted by a man who worked as an extra and taken with a woman who appeared to do the same. Trump’s campaign has never acknowledged knowingly hiring actors, but did acknowledge paying $12,000 to Gotham Government Relations, a firm that was said to have hired the Extra Mile Inc. casting company, according to a complaint filed with the Federal Election Commission. Neither Gotham nor GMLV Casting, which took over Extra Mile, responded to requests for comment in recent days. While some in Trump’s orbit suggested a return to Trump Tower for his re-election announcement, the president will head to Orlando — in a state he must win to secure a second term. This time, there will be no need to hire actors. Trump and his campaign say 100,000 tickets have been requested for Tuesday’s event at the 20,000-seat Amway Center. The event will feature a pregame show with food trucks, live music and jumbo screens to pump up the crowd. ___ Colvin reported from Washington. ___ Follow Colvin and Lemire on Twitter at https://twitter.com/colvinj and https://twitter.com/JonLemire