American West

25 Apr 19
At Home He Feels Like A Tourist

The Price Wyndham’s Theatre, 10th April 2019 Pretty pleased with myself here. Played chicken with Delfont Mackintosh Theatres and won, eventually getting a cheap, in a known, if not entirely comfortable, berth at the Wyndham’s near the end of the run. Arthur Miller, David Suchet, Brendan Coyle and some very strong reviews from the original […]

25 Apr 19
Links King

There is nothing, this indicates, quite as natural to people as betting is. Betting has been part of individual tradition on every continent on Earth. From the Natives of North America to China and 12bet  in between, placing a wager on the outcome of a game has been part of activities life. Sports betting remains […]

25 Apr 19
The Atlantic Post

A Two Part Feature Series By Natasha Akpoti Nigeria is simply a geographical expression of the imperialists’ greed and spite.    ***************************************** Recent, I was on a flight from Dallas to London when I struck an interesting conversation with an American professor of African history. We talked about the human race and countries. America, he […]

25 Apr 19
Organic Ranking

There’s nothing, this indicates, quite as natural to human beings as betting is. Betting has been an integral part of individual lifestyle on every continent on Earth. From the Natives of North America to China and everywhere between, putting a wager on the outcome of a game has been an integral part of activities 12bet. […]

25 Apr 19
onlylol

There is nothing, it appears, really as natural to people as betting is. Betting has been a part of human tradition on every continent on Earth. From the Natives of North America to China and every where between, placing a wager on the end result of a game title has been an integral part of […]

25 Apr 19
Telugu News

Chandra Bose death mystery deepen New evidence from the American handwriting expert Carl Baggett seeks to establish the fact that Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose indeed lived in India for decades post-independence as Gumnami Baba. Baggett has reached this conclusion after he analysed letters written by Netaji and Gumnami Baba. Carl Baggett’s unquestionable authority comes with […]

25 Apr 19
RAF 238 Squadron

Five years ago, that is how this blog got started. A photo without a caption shared by Cathy Swanson. She only knew her father was there. Collection Gil Gillis On April 24, 2019 Mark Gibson shared this page from his father’s logbook. Collection Mark Gibson Now, let’s turn back the clock to April 26, 1942… […]

25 Apr 19
ODE TO A TEEN

The first time I saw Mercy Chinwo on-screen, she was auditioning for the second season of Nigerian Idols, the currently-defunct Nigerian version of the international Idol series. Nigerian Idol ran for five seasons between 2010 and 2015, providing a notable platform for young gifted singers to showcase their talent to a vibrant audience. The primetime […]

25 Apr 19
Mother Jones
One month ago, the United States was supporting a United Nations-led plan to bring peace to Libya through a mediated agreement that, presumably, would unify the country under one government’s rule. Then Donald Trump hopped on the phone and called a warlord.  This presidential contact with strongman Khalifa Haftar, a general who has controlled the eastern part of Libya for roughly five years, further complicated the increasingly violent civil war brewing between militias allied with the UN-recognized government in Tripoli and those supporting Haftar’s Libyan National Army. The White House only revealed that the conversation took place four days after it happened—and eight days after Secretary of State Mike Pompeo urged an “immediate halt” to Haftar’s advance and denounced him for “undermining prospects for a better future for all Libyans.” Trump sounded a different tune with Haftar during their call, according to the White House. The two men discussed “ongoing counterterrorism efforts” and “a shared vision for Libya’s transition to a stable, democratic political system.”  Ben Fishman, a former Obama administration official who worked on Libya policy, tells Mother Jones that Trump’s call undermined “the traditional policy toward Libya, including in his administration over the past two years.”  Earlier this month, when Haftar launched a military offensive to seize the capital, the United States joined its allies in condemning the maneuver as a major impediment to peace in North Africa, which has been mired in conflict since the ouster of dictator Moammar Qaddafi in 2011. Three years ago, an interim government called the Government of National Accord was set up with backing from the United Nations, but its grip on power has been tenuous and rival factions have dominated the political process.  The US has supported the UN’s peacemaking process and repeatedly sanctioned Libyans who “threaten the peace, security, stability, sovereignty” of the region. Peter Bodde, a senior American diplomat in Libya, reportedly even warned Haftar against moving on Tripoli, according to a report in Bloomberg. But Trump’s phone call all but abandoned that position. Bloomberg reported that Trump and National Security Adviser John Bolton gave Haftar the “impression of a US green light for an offensive” to topple the UN-backed government.  That sort of abrupt reversal has occurred several times during Trump’s two years in office. For instance, in December Trump announced the withdrawal of all American service members in Syria only a few months after his top aides vowed to maintain troops in the country indefinitely. Qatar, a country Trump accused in 2017 of being a “funder of terrorism,” became a key ally in “stopping the funding of terrorism” last year. “Even saying what the administration’s policy is on any given major issue is virtually impossible,” Jon Finer, former chief of staff to Secretary of State John Kerry, wrote for Politico early in Trump’s first year of office. “This is not just embarrassing, but dangerous.” Haftar’s army has been accused of war crimes, including the burning of dozens of houses, throughout its campaign to seize control of several important oilfields in southern Libya. A former Qaddafi ally and military officer, Haftar portrays himself as an opponent of Islamist fundamentalism, but his ranks include a group of literalist Muslims known as Salafists. Despite his spokesman’s affirmation last week on Twitter that democracy “will return to our nation,” Haftar, who once said his homeland was “not ripe for democracy,” has shown little inclination toward ceding power to the people. His assault on the capital began during the same week UN Secretary General António Guterres was in Tripoli organizing a conference to broker peace among Libya’s warring militias. “I still hope it is possible to avoid a bloody confrontation in and around Tripoli,” Guterres said on Twitter after meeting with Haftar.  Despite Trump’s apparent endorsement of Haftar’s actions, Libya’s official government denied any change in US policy. “We deal with statements from the State Department and direct contacts with the American administration and the message is very clear: They are not pleased with the attack on Tripoli,” Prime Minister Fayez al-Sarraj told Bloomberg this week. A State Department official reiterated this view in a statement provided to Mother Jones. “We have voiced our deep concern at the highest levels about instability in Tripoli,” the official said. “All involved parties should return to the political process to provide a secure and prosperous future for all Libyans.” Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan said last week that the Pentagon and “the executive branch are well-aligned on Libya,” but even he refused to endorse Haftar’s military offensive. “A military solution is not what Libya needs,” he told reporters on April 19.  The US has had a long history with Haftar, who in the 1980s turned on Qaddafi and assisted a failed CIA-backed effort to oust him. Haftar then fled to Virginia, where he lived for two decades. Upon his return to Libya, where he raised an army, US government officials, including the special envoy to Libya, communicated with him, Fishman said, but he consistently refused to accept a role such as commander of the military under civilian control. After establishing a truce with the UN-backed government in the west, Haftar ended the uneasy peace earlier this year by crafting a deal to take over a major Libyan oil field, the New York Times reported. Tripoli, home to the central bank and state-owned oil corporation, was an obvious next step in what Fishman describes as Heftar’s “effort toward total control of the country.” Saudi Arabia, Russia, France, and the United Arab Emirates have all extended implicit—and in some cases, explicit—support to Haftar, who has courted international allies with the assurance that he would provide stability to a combustible region. His international backing was clear at a UN Security Council meeting last week, where a proposal to demand a ceasefire flopped amid apparent opposition from Russia and the United States. What Trump stands to gain from a protracted conflict isn’t clear. “I do not see a role in Libya,” he said three months after taking office. “I think the United States has, right now, enough roles.” According to the White House description of the conversation, Trump discussed counterterrorism and oil production with the Libyan strongman. (The price of oil is a topic of particular fascination to Trump and, as in previous conflicts, oil production could be negatively affected.) But as Haftar struggles to gain ground against a motley assortment of militias aligned against him, the “continued campaign may only prolong the country’s instability,” the New York Times reported. At least 20,000 civilians have already been displaced by the fighting and some of Haftar’s forces have been pushed roughly 40 miles out of the city. Amid all the chaos, Trump’s decision to call the general seems even more baffling. “It was surprising, to say the least,” Fishman says. 
25 Apr 19
Twin Cities
Seafood soft scrambles, Southern flair and global influences are some of the trends at new brunch places that have popped up in St. Paul. We’ve made the rounds and found 12 spots to add to our ever-growing list of great Twin Cities places to have that in-between meal. It might be worth noting (we learned the hard way) that some restaurants serve brunch only one weekend day but not both. We’ve included the hours and what days brunch is served to this list. GRAND CATCH Shrimp and Grits at Grand Catch in St. Paul, March 3, 2019. (Nancy Ngo / Pioneer Press) Attention, beignet fans: Grand Catch makes a delicious version of the warm and fluffy New Orleans-style square doughnuts. And that’s not all to look forward to. This Cajun spot near Macalester College spins such flavor-enhancing dishes as its rendition of chicken and waffles, but instead of waffles, you get sweet corn pancakes, a fried egg, brown butter coconut syrup and jalapeno butter. We also love the careful attention to detail, such as serving boneless — yet juicy — chicken that made it easy to cut. Then there’s the well-played shrimp and grits that preserve some of the grits’ coarseness for just the right texture and heft. Those wanting to try the seafood boil will be happy to know that it and a few other dishes off the regular menu are also available during brunch. Reservations are available here, which we recommend. On the Sunday we visited, the place was packed, and walk-ins had to wait awhile to be seated. Brunch 10 a.m-3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday; entrees $8-$17; 1672 Grand Ave, St. Paul; 651-348-8541; grandcatchmn.com HANDSOME HOG Hot Brown at Handsome Hog in St. Paul, Jan. 12, 2019. (Nancy Ngo / Pioneer Press) It’s safe to say that the brunch here is “eggcellent.” To prove it — and take advantage of Handsome Hog’s pork-centric menu during its Sunday brunch service — order the Boss Hog egg dish, which comes with bacon, house-made sausage and more sides. Or go for the Chop & Eggs, which includes a juicy Duroc chop, home fries and a ladle-full of red eye gravy. And then there’s Handsome Hog’s famous Hot Brown, with house ham, maple bourbon bacon, sunny-side-up egg and silky Mornay sauce. Either way you slice it, you can’t go wrong with any of the flavorfully bold brunch dishes here. Is pork-infused fare not your thing? There’s still plenty more to be had, such as the Cajun eggs Benedict, brisket hash, chicken and waffles, biscuits and gravy, and barbecue shrimp and grits, to name a few. Brunch 10 a.m-2 p.m. Sunday; entrees $12-$22; 203 E. Sixth St., St. Paul; 651-340-7710; handsomehog.com HOLMAN’S TABLE Grapefruit Brulee at Holman’s Table in St. Paul, Jan. 19, 2019. (Nancy Ngo / Pioneer Press) Since brunch took flight at this restaurant at the St. Paul Downtown Airport (also known as Holman Field), it’s attracted a packed house. The menu of brunch fare, as well as salads, sandwiches and brunch cocktails, is just as sophisticated as the restaurant space. Recommended is the cheffed up corned beef hash with a thick slice of corned beef, crisp potatoes, eggs and toast. We also swooned over the grapefruit brulee, a halved ruby red topped with crunchy, sweet caramelized sugar, house whipped cream and berry jam. It was a grapefruit concoction like no other. We couldn’t tell if we were eating breakfast or dessert — not a bad problem to have. We only wished that the grapefruit wedges had been scooped into a ramekin because it was a little sloppy doing it ourselves. For those who can’t make it to the restaurant on the weekend, there’s some good news. Some brunch items, such as the grapefruit brulee, breakfast bowls, omelettes and hash, are also available weekdays for breakfast. Brunch 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday; entrees $8-$17; Holman Field, 644 Bayfield St., St. Paul, 612-800-5298, holmanstable.com IN BLOOM Dutch Baby Pancakes with leeks, mushroom, goat cheese and fried egg at In Bloom in St. Paul, April 7, 2019. (Nancy Ngo / Pioneer Press) Brunch has recently sprung at the hearth-cooking restaurant that debuted last fall at Keg and Case West 7th Market. The menu is ambitious, and brunch favorites get star treatment in such dishes as venison chilaquiles or prime beef hash. Even classics are amped up, such as Dutch baby pancakes laden with veggies and more. You can also get nontraditional brunch items — a porterhouse, smoked white fish or duck hearts, anyone? Order a side of the grilled broccolini salad to share at the table to balance the richness of some of the dishes and because it’s just that good. This hot spot is often packed, so reservations are recommended. Brunch 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday; entrees $12-$22; 928 W. Seventh St., St. Paul; 651-237-9630; inbloomstp.com J. SELBY’S Breakfast Scramble at J. Selby’s in St. Paul, Aug. 11, 2018. (Nancy Ngo / Pioneer Press) This casual, order-at-the-counter plant-based vegan eatery is all about comfort food, and the brunch here — even sans meat — carries out that theme, too. Fluffy pancakes served with a better-than-average maple syrup was our favorite. If you can get over the texture difference, tofu scrambles that emulate scrambled eggs and Herbivorous Butcher “meats” make for flavorful and herbaceous brunch dishes. With most entree prices at $7 or less, you’ll have extra cash to splurge on that vegan cheesecake for dessert. Brunch 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Sunday; entrees $5-$14; 169 N. Victoria St., St. Paul; 651-222-3263; jselbys.com PAJARITO Huevos Rancheros at Pajarito in St. Paul, March 10, 2019. (Nancy Ngo / Pioneer Press) Menu items offered at Sunday brunch are just as refined as those served at lunch and dinner at this contemporary Mexican bistro off West Seventh Street. We’ve always loved the depth of flavor of the dishes that come out of the kitchen here, and the brunch items are no exception. Of the six items offered for brunch, we highly recommend the huevos rancheros with a memorable house-made pico de gallo. The revueltas, a soft scrambled egg dish with veggies, crab and mascarpone, also leaves nothing to be desired. Brunch cocktails, incorporating mezcal and tequila, are one of a kind. Brunch 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday; entrees $7-$11; 605 W. Seventh St., St. Paul; 651-340-9545; pajaritostp.com PARLOUR King crab and curry scrambled eggs at Parlour in St. Paul, March 13, 2019. (Nancy Ngo / Pioneer Press) While we’re fans of the lunch and dinner menus, brunch service seemed a little off the first time we tried it. A brisket hash had only a sliver of meat, leaving us asking where’s the beef, and the chilaquiles left us wanting more sauce. The only item we liked from our group’s order was the famous Parlour burger, which you can get at brunch in addition to the lunch and dinner menus, with the option of adding an egg or bacon on top. Some weeks later, the brunch menu was overhauled,  we returned, and we’re glad we did. Parlour has ironed out the kinks, doing away with dishes that weren’t working while adding others. This time the hash came with a good helping of brisket, and an au jus and cheese sauce gave welcome depth. Our favorite egg dish was a soft scramble with king crab and seasoned with a yellow curry that married wonderfully. And then of course, there’s that Parlour burger. We added an egg to make it feel more brunch-y. Whether it’s morning, noon or night, we just can’t resist that burger. Brunch 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday; entrees $10$16.50; 267 W. Seventh St., St. Paul; 651-207-4433; parlourbar.com PUBLIC KITCHEN + BAR Steak and Eggs at Public Kitchen + Bar in St. Paul, March 9, 2019. (Nancy Ngo / Pioneer Press) This pretty 180-seat contemporary American restaurant with floor-to-ceiling windows was packed on a recent brunch outing, with all sorts — from families to millennials sipping on bottomless mimosas ($10) — gathered around the tables. The brunch menu includes Creole-influenced fare, and it’s clear the place is crazy about Benedicts. It offers four kinds: classic, crab cake, Creole and Florentine. The Creole Benedict easily won our hearts with its perfectly poached egg, flavor-laden house-made Andouille sausage and Creole-infused hollandaise. On a return visit, it will be difficult to choose between that and the steak and eggs, another dish we adored for its flawless over-easy eggs and a grilled flat iron steak we wanted medium rare. The chimichurri sauce and fingerling potatoes were icing on the steak. Brunch 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Entrees $9-$16; 229 E. Sixth St., St Paul; 651-348-6456; publickitchenstpaul.com RED RABBIT The Enzo soft scramble with burrata at Red Rabbit in St. Paul, Dec. 2, 2018. (Nancy Ngo / Pioneer Press) Come one, come all to this Summit Hill spot with ample seating that easily accommodates small to large groups. The brunch menu at this no-fuss contemporary eatery includes breakfast tacos, bowls, Belgian waffles and soft-scrambled eggs with house-cured salmon, among other items. Pizzas and pastas are also available. Our favorite off the menu was the Enzo, a composed soft-scramble dish tinged in romesco sauce, topped with creamy burrata and served with a side of crisp herb-seasoned potatoes. We also appreciated the Tuscan flair of The Bolzano, a bowl of creamy polenta topped with tomato sauce, pesto, poached egg and toasted pumpkin seeds. Brunch 10 a.m-2 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays; entrees $8-$17; 788 Grand Ave., St. Paul; 651-444-5995; redrabbitmn.com SALTY TART Salmon Tartine at Salty Tart in St. Paul, Nov. 15, 2018. (Nancy Ngo / Pioneer Press) Brunch is served seven days a week at this order-at-the-counter bakery and eatery. Clean and lean ingredients lend a light touch to the dishes. We haven’t had a bad bite here yet, but if we were to hone in on our favorites, it would be the melt-in-your-mouth salmon tartine plate with lightly smoked fish, creme fraiche and a soft-boiled quail’s egg cleverly rounded out with salmon roe and house pickles. The buckwheat crepe galette with an egg, prosciutto and oozing gruyere buried in a bed of arugula ensured we started off the day with plenty of greens. Another dish that made us smile was the shirred eggs with spinach and bacon and delicious baguette slices that came with it for dunking. And last but not least, there’s the primo coffee to wash it all down. Brunch menu served daily 8 a.m.-2 p.m.; entrees $7-$13; 289 E. Fifth St., St. Paul; 612-874-9206; saltytart.com THE LEXINGTON Eggs Benedict at The Lexington in St. Paul, Feb. 24, 2019. (Nancy Ngo / Pioneer Press) We didn’t expect to fall so hard for the Swedish pancakes, but it happened at this classy and classic St. Paul institution that revamped Sunday brunch service a few months ago. If the thin, fluffy, great-tasting pancakes weren’t enough, the apple butter and pecans mixed into the bacon bourbon maple syrup easily made our hearts go pitter-patter. The classic eggs Benedict with a delightful hollandaise sauce also sent us all aflutter. Reservations are recommended at this always wildly popular restaurant. Brunch 10 a.m-2 p.m. Sundays; entrees $12-$23; 1096 Grand Ave., St. Paul; 651-289-4990; thelexmn.com TILLIE’S FARMHOUSE Lemon Cornmeal Pancakes at TillieÕs Farmhouse in St. Paul, April 4, 2019. (Nancy Ngo / Pioneer Press) This laid-back neighborhood order-at-the-counter gem serves memorable homestyle, farm-fresh dishes such as lemon cornmeal pancakes ($6). Brunch dishes also pay attention to the seasons, sneaking in the freshest picks from nature’s bounty and making us glad to eat veggie-laden plates such as the root vegetable hash and garden Benedict. The down-to-earth atmosphere and prices keep the regulars coming back. Brunch 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays; $6-$13; 232 N. Cleveland Ave., St. Paul; 651-645-8950; tilliesfarmhouse.com [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]
25 Apr 19

Weather porn about Texas, a lesson for Earth Day 2019 http://bit.ly/2Gw6Etg Reposted from the Fabius Maximus Blog. Larry Kummer, Editor Information & News, Science & Nature 22 April 2019 A lesson for Earth Day – A people can be molded into a new form by years of skillful propaganda. This is happening in America today, […]

25 Apr 19
VM MARBLES PVT LTD

Poisonous Rocks and Minerals of the World We often wonder if the Earth beneath our feet could swallow us up. The truth is more insidious. Drop that rock you just picked up . . . you could get poisoned. This post details the ten most toxic and potentially deadly minerals that crystalize in the Earth’s […]

25 Apr 19
World Site News

Terrorism 3.0 will continue to spread like a global cancer, enhanced by the accelerative power of the internet. Until the other day, few Americans could likely find Sri Lanka on a map, nor even dimly remember its British colonial name, Ceylon. But the Indian Ocean nation flashed across news screens over the Easter weekend with…

25 Apr 19
Iowa Climate Science Education

Reposted from the Fabius Maximus Blog. Larry Kummer, Editor Information & News, Science & Nature 22 April 2019 A lesson for Earth Day – A people can be molded into a new form by years of skillful propaganda. This is happening in America today, as journalists systematically lie to us about the weather. They have […]

25 Apr 19
Magical BookLush

Learn about the fantastic novels written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle involving heart throbbing mysteries and adventures of Mr. Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson.