Anastigmat

02 Jun 19
Redwood Times
Early photography is the focus of a new display in the Victorian Room at the Clarke Historical Museum in Eureka. “This exhibit explores photography and its role in the Victorian period as a new medium for art and documentation,” said Community Curator Hannah Denton, who created and curated the exhibit. “Victorian Era Photography” opened in May during National Photography Month and will be available to view over the next few months. It includes examples of photos taken during the Victorian era (1837-1901) as well as some of the tools used to take and process those images, Denton said. Several cameras used in that period are also on view. The exhibit highlights three of the early types of photography: daguerreotype, tin type and cartes de visite, all used long before film, then digital, became popular. “The daguerreotype was introduced in the very early Victorian period. … Daguerreotypes were seen more as a mechanical aspect. It wasn’t necessarily artistic, to show the person’s characteristic or their personality,” Denton said. “It was mostly just to create an identical likeness. Right before daguerreotype, the only way you’d get a really good likeness of a person was a very detailed portrait, which only the wealthy could afford. When daguerreotypes started to become popular, you could go to the studio, sit down for 10 minutes and get your almost exact replica taken.” “Cartes de visite,” she said, “… was the most popular kind during the Victorian era, because they were easier to replicate and you could take multiple at a time.” Pictured are several early portraits, including two at center and right by early local photographer A.W. Ericson. (Heather Shelton — The Times-Standard) The Clarke exhibit also has a section about stereoscopes, which gained popularity in the mid-1800s. They are seen as an early version of what is known today as the View-Master. “Stereocards, they’re two images that are almost the same, slightly different,” Denton said. “When you look through the viewfinder, they have a 3D effect.” A usable stereoscope is available in the Victorian Room so people can view the three-dimensional images and better understand this type of photography. Three early cameras are also on display, including an 1890’s Eastman Kodak camera, a Blair Camera Co. Makers Brown Leather Box camera and a Kodak Anastigmat camera that belonged to local photographer A.W. Ericson who, said Denton, “began his photography journey in 1879.” “Ericson’s work,” she said, “functioned frequently as the window into Humboldt County, appearing in many different expositions across the country like the Panama-Pacific International Exposition and widely published as postcards and prints.” Several of Ericson’s photographs are also on view in the Victorian Room. The Clarke Historical Museum — which features myriad other exhibits about Humboldt County’s vast history — is located at 240 E St. in Eureka. Hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Sunday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is also open during Friday Night Markets, Fridays through October, from 5 to 8 p.m. and during Arts Alive!, the first Saturday of the month from 6 to 9 p.m. The suggested admission donation is $5 per person and $10 for families. For more information about the museum, go to http://www.clarkemuseum.org or call 707-443-1947.    
02 Jun 19
Times-Standard
Early photography is the focus of a new display in the Victorian Room at the Clarke Historical Museum in Eureka. “This exhibit explores photography and its role in the Victorian period as a new medium for art and documentation,” said Community Curator Hannah Denton, who created and curated the exhibit. “Victorian Era Photography” opened in May during National Photography Month and will be available to view over the next few months. It includes examples of photos taken during the Victorian era (1837-1901) as well as some of the tools used to take and process those images, Denton said. Several cameras used in that period are also on view. The exhibit highlights three of the early types of photography: daguerreotype, tin type and cartes de visite, all used long before film, then digital, became popular. “The daguerreotype was introduced in the very early Victorian period. … Daguerreotypes were seen more as a mechanical aspect. It wasn’t necessarily artistic, to show the person’s characteristic or their personality,” Denton said. “It was mostly just to create an identical likeness. Right before daguerreotype, the only way you’d get a really good likeness of a person was a very detailed portrait, which only the wealthy could afford. When daguerreotypes started to become popular, you could go to the studio, sit down for 10 minutes and get your almost exact replica taken.” “Cartes de visite,” she said, “… was the most popular kind during the Victorian era, because they were easier to replicate and you could take multiple at a time.” Pictured are several early portraits, including two at center and right by early local photographer A.W. Ericson. (Heather Shelton — The Times-Standard) The Clarke exhibit also has a section about stereoscopes, which gained popularity in the mid-1800s. They are seen as an early version of what is known today as the View-Master. “Stereocards, they’re two images that are almost the same, slightly different,” Denton said. “When you look through the viewfinder, they have a 3D effect.” A usable stereoscope is available in the Victorian Room so people can view the three-dimensional images and better understand this type of photography. Three early cameras are also on display, including an 1890’s Eastman Kodak camera, a Blair Camera Co. Makers Brown Leather Box camera and a Kodak Anastigmat camera that belonged to local photographer A.W. Ericson who, said Denton, “began his photography journey in 1879.” “Ericson’s work,” she said, “functioned frequently as the window into Humboldt County, appearing in many different expositions across the country like the Panama-Pacific International Exposition and widely published as postcards and prints.” Several of Ericson’s photographs are also on view in the Victorian Room. The Clarke Historical Museum — which features myriad other exhibits about Humboldt County’s vast history — is located at 240 E St. in Eureka. Hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Sunday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is also open during Friday Night Markets, Fridays through October, from 5 to 8 p.m. and during Arts Alive!, the first Saturday of the month from 6 to 9 p.m. The suggested admission donation is $5 per person and $10 for families. For more information about the museum, go to http://www.clarkemuseum.org or call 707-443-1947.    
18 May 19
Life Hacks

I have a lovely little No1 Pocket Kodak from about the 1920s or 30s. It is the bottom of the range model with the “Single lens”. The aperture is not marked in f-numbers, but just labelled 1, 2, 3 and 4. Is there a way of knowing the f-number equivalent aperture for gauging exposures with […]

08 May 19
usingoldcameras

Specification Type: Twin Lens Reflex camera. Roll film 120 format 6 x 6 cm. Taking Lens: Novar-Anastigmat 75 mm f 3.5 or Carl Zeiss Tessar 75 mm f 3.5. Viewing Lens: Teronar-Anastigmat 75 mm f 3.5. Filter thread: 35.5 mm. Shutter: Prontor-SVS. Times B, 1 s…1/300 s. Manually cocked. Aperture: 10 blades. Adjustable from f […]

08 May 19
usingoldcameras

Background Zeiss Ikon was formed in 1926 in Dresden when Contessa-Nettel, Ernemann and Goerz merged around Zeiss owned Ica. Initially there were more than 200 camera models. In the period leading to the Second World War the balance of model range shifted from large format and plate cameras to rollfilm and 35 mm – miniature […]

02 May 19
pnasium

‘Why do you like the Graflex so much?’ Mr Nikos Pikopoulos, the camera saint, asked me. ‘The truth is I can’t really say… maybe it is a feeling generated by the leather covering, the brass metal bits and pieces, the view on the ground glass, the glorious curtain sound, the various back options, being SLR, […]

15 Apr 19
Grateful Gadgets

Bolsey B2 Vintage Wood SLR Film Camera Bolsey Camera 35mm camera Camera Strap Photographer Gift Camera gift Bolsey Model B2 35mm film camera and 44mm f3.2 Anastigmat lens with beautiful Natural Cherry Wood inlay. This vintage rangefinder camera was produced throughout the 1940’s-1950’s and made a great compact travel accessory. Each unique piece of natural […]

15 Apr 19
Grateful Gadgets

Bolsey B2 Vintage Wood SLR Film Camera Bolsey Camera 35mm camera Camera Strap Photographer Gift Camera gift Bolsey Model B2 35mm film camera and 44mm f3.2 Anastigmat lens with beautiful Natural Cherry Wood inlay. This vintage rangefinder camera was produced throughout the 1940’s-1950’s and made a great compact travel accessory. Each unique piece of natural […]

15 Apr 19
Grateful Gadgets

Bolsey B2 Vintage Wood SLR Film Camera Bolsey Camera 35mm camera Camera Strap Photographer Gift Camera gift Bolsey Model B2 35mm film camera and 44mm f3.2 Anastigmat lens with beautiful Natural Chestnut Wood inlay. This vintage rangefinder camera was produced throughout the 1940’s-1950’s and made a great compact travel accessory. Each unique piece of natural […]

02 Apr 19
pnasium

Cine equipment always fascinated me. I started buying home cine cameras and projectors first. At some point I was buying cine & still cameras and gradually only still cameras. I am not a collector, I am a user and cine film is too expensive. I have kept three cine cameras, three projectors and some cine […]

24 Mar 19
Mostly Black & White

The 0-series replica is a simple camera. It doesn’t even have a rangefinder. Mine now does.

21 Mar 19
News Archives Uk

The Italian earth observation satellite PRISMA will launch on Thursday aboard the Vega rocket of Arianespace. Vega is expected to lift off from the Center Spatial Guyanais launch pad in Kourou, French Guiana, at 22:50:35 local time (01:50 UTC on Friday).PRISMA or Precursore Iperspettrale della Missione Applicativa is a small hyperspectral imaging satellite built by […]