Angenieux

22 Apr 19
The Beat: A Blog by PremiumBeat
Let’s look at the cameras used to capture the entire Marvel Cinematic Universe. First up, we’ll explore the Phase One films. I was curious about which camera was most used throughout the production process of the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU), so I took a deep dive into each of the films to find out. This was quite the journey back through time — and through tons of research — into the production of each film. So let’s sift through each phase: Phase One (2008-2012), Phase Two (2013-2015), and Phase Three (2016-2019). We’ll also look at what the future holds with upcoming Phase Four Marvel films. Here’s what I learned about the camera packages used on each Marvel Phase One film — from Iron Man to The Avengers. (Stay tuned in the following days for the next article in this series.) MCU Phase One: “Avengers assemble!” Iron Man Image via Marvel Studios. Director: Jon Favreau Director of Photography: Matthew Libatique US Release: May 2008 Camera Package: Arriflex 235 (PanARRI) Panavision Panaflex Millennium XL Panavision Panaflex Millennium Lenses Panavision Primo Angenieux Optimo 4:1 (17-80mm T2.2) and 12:1 (24-290mm T2.8) Cooke 15-40mm T2 Captured on 35 mm (Kodak Vision2 200T 5217, Vision2 500T 5218) In a conversation with the ASC, Libatique shared the following: Cinematography typically takes on the character of the lead performer, and Robert is so improvisational the photography became the same way. Working with [Favreau] was really about giving the actors the freedom to become their characters. We ended up doing a lot of rigging on a large scale, so we could be ready for anything. And once we started shooting, I started improvising. The Incredible Hulk Image via Universal Studios/Marvel Studios. Director: Louis Leterrier Director of Photography: Peter Menzies Jr. US Release: June 2008 Camera Package: Arriflex 235 Arriflex 435 ES Panavision Panaflex Millennium XL Panavision Panaflex Millennium Panavision Panaflex Platinum Panavision C-Series Lenses Captured on 35 mm In an interview with Collider, Louis Leterrier talked about the production: For me, it’s really not different. It really is not different. Do you know why? Because most of the budget goes into visual effects, so the actual tools that I had to shoot the movie with were pretty much the same. You know, the actors are a little bit more expensive and the visual effects are a little bit more expensive, but the actual money that I had to shoot my movie with was pretty much the same… You still struggle. You have to finish the day because the producers are like: “Oh you better finish the day or you’re going to get fired.” Image via Universal Studios/Marvel Studios. As for the now-legendary first crossover and appearance of Tony Stark (at the end of the film back in 2008) Leterrier shared the following: I begged Kevin Fiege, the President of Marvel, when I knew that Robert got cast, I was like: ‘We have to do crossovers.’ Crossovers — it’s the future of movie-making. Now that you have this, I was the one to beg them to do crossovers. They said Robert is going to be tough to convince. You know, and all that stuff and everything. So, eventually I got to talk to Robert and we liked each other, and he said, ‘Okay, I’ll come for a . . . I’ve got 5 hours that day.’ Let’s shoot in L.A. We were on the way back from Brazil about to go to the North Pole to shoot the opening sequence, with one day in L.A., actually. Iron Man was doing lots of reshooting. They reshot like two weeks, or something, and they had like half a day where they could give us half a day. So, I just directed Iron Man crew for one day. I brought in William Hurt that day and that was it. It was great. It was fantastic. That may be the understatement of the decade right there: “Crossovers — it’s the future of movie-making.” Iron Man 2 Image via Marvel Studios. Director: Jon Favreau Director of Photography: Matthew Libatique US Release: May 2010 Camera Package: Panavision Panaflex Millennium XL2 Arriflex 435 Advanced VistaVision Phantom Photo-Sonics Canon EOS 5D Mark II (some shots) Lenses Panavision Primo Angenieux Optimo Lenses, 15-40mm and 28-76mm Captured on 35mm (Kodak Vision2 50D 5201, Vision2 200T 5217, Vision3 500T 5219, Vision 500T 5279) Image via Marvel Studios. Talking to the ASC about the race track shoot, 2nd Unit DP Jonathan Taylor revealed his equipment list included a high-speed camera-tracking vehicle, a Porsche 928 rented from Propulsion in Paris (driven by Jean-François Dubut), mounted with VistaVision cameras from Geo and Procam; an insert car rigged with VistaVision cameras, Arri 435s, and Canon EOS 5D Mark IIs; and a Mercedes SUV-mounted Russian Arm rented from Bickers Action. Additionally, ground cameras were positioned to grab shots of the Rolls speeding by, and even a helicopter, rented from Flying Pictures, was employed for aerial shots. “We had all the toys, and we ran a whole convoy around the track,” Taylor continues. “It was quite a trick to pull the whole thing off.” Equipment-wise, however, the second unit had its hands full: We used a couple of Photo-Sonics cameras for some high-speed crashes with the race cars. We also had a high-speed track alongside and synced with the race cars so we could launch everything at the same time, and run parallel to the cars. [Second-unit key grip] Richard Mall built the track, and we had four cameras on it: a VistaVision, a Phantom, and two Arri 435s. Taylor also incorporated Canon EOS 5D Mark II DSLRs, fitted with Canon lenses, as crash cameras. One of the problems with doing action stuff is finding interesting places to put the camera . . . [we] actually put the 5Ds on the cars we were going to crash. We cut holes for the lenses in small Pelican cases that we painted to match the cars. We got some amazing shots. Of course, it’s not film quality, but for a 12-frame cut in an action piece, it holds up very well. Thor Image via Marvel Studios/British Cinematographer. Director: Kenneth Branagh Director of Photography: Haris Zambarloukos US Release: May 2011 Camera Package: Arriflex 435 Panavision Panaflex Millennium XL2 Panavision Panaflex Platinum Photo-Sonics 4ER Lenses Panavision G-Series, ATZ, AWZ2 and SP Lenses Captured on 35 mm (Kodak Vision2 50D 5201, Vision3 250D 5207, Vision3 500T 5219) Talking to British Cinematographer about previz and production, DP Haris Zambarloukos shared the following: In pre-production, The Third Floor set-up at Raleigh Studios in Manhattan Beach, where we shot most of the VFX sequences, they pre-visualised all the action sequences. Sometimes I would work with them on CG lighting, to give the previz a similar look to what we wanted to achieve, when we came to shoot. Along with the pre-visualised scenes, Wes created a ‘techviz’, where you can see the path of a witness camera in a scene. This meant we could discuss what equipment we’d need on the day, to make a shot work. For example, a shot might start at 40ft in the air, so we knew we’d need a 50ft crane. Captain America: The First Avenger Image via Paramount Pictures/Marvel Studios. Director: Joe Johnston Director of Photography: Shelly Johnson US Release: July 2011 Camera Package: Arri Alexa Arriflex 235 Arriflex 435 Canon EOS 5D Mark II Panavision Genesis HD Camera Panavision Panaflex Millennium XL2 Lenses Panavision Primo Lenses, 27: 275 mm and 17.5: 75 MM zoom, 14.5, 17.5, 21m 27, 35, 40, 50, 75,100 and 150 mm Primes. Canon Lenses Captured on 35 mm (Kodak Vision2 200T 5217, Vision3 500T 5219), SxS Pro, HD Video In his conversation with British Cinematographer, Shelly Johnson shared the following: Joe and I agreed to bend the period look slightly to accommodate a comic book superhero who wears a costume, face mask, and carries a large shield . . . We figured we could take certain liberties. On the other hand, Joe and I wanted a realistic look, so we had to strike a balance. Our research included studying visual components that we would integrate into the storytelling that are true to the period, as well as where we could stretch realism in compelling ways. The Avengers Image via Marvel Studios. Director: Joss Whedon Director of Photography: Seamus McGarvey US Release: May 2012 Camera Package: Arri Alexa Arriflex 435 Canon EOS 5D Mark II Canon EOS 7D Lenses Panavision Primo, Primo Zoom (PCZ), Frazier Lenses Canon EF Lenses Captured on 35 mm (Kodak Vision3 500T 5219), ARRIRAW, HD Video, Codex Image via Marvel Studios. In a conversation with ARRI, DP Seamus McGarvey spoke about avoiding a comic book look: Joss and I were keen on having a very visceral and naturalistic quality to the image . . . We wanted this to feel immersive and did not want a ‘comic book look’ that might distance an audience with the engagement of the film. We moved the camera a lot on Steadicam, cranes, and on dollies to create kinetic images; and we chose angles that were dramatic, like low angles for heroic imagery. For more on The Avengers production, check out 6 Filmmaking Takeaways from the Set of The Avengers and Avengers Assembled: Editing a Blockbuster. Update: A previous version of this post mentioned a portion of The Avengers was shot on an iPhone. This has been refuted by McGarvey. This concludes the first phase of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Stay tuned for more installments, and a summary of the cameras most often used on Marvel films. Looking for more articles on the filmmaking industry? Check these out. Breakout Director Kat Candler on the Best Festivals for First-Time Filmmakers NAB 2019: Our Favorite Releases from This Year’s Show Industry Insights: A Conversation with Actor and Director Melanie Mayron Industry Insights: Below the Line Women Speak Out Industry Insights: The Blasting Company on Animation Scoring
05 Apr 19
Freya

Angenieux AF 28-70mm f/2.6 Zoom Lens for Sony Alpha and Minolta A Mount #E3192 – Buy – Angenieux AF 28-70mm f/2.6 Zoom Lens for Sony Alpha and Minolta A Mount #E3192

04 Apr 19
SysGalaxy Market Research

Global Cinema Lenses Market report features the major aspect of the market in terms of historic data, fcurrent market situations, market demand along with detailed analysis of the key players involved in the market.Cinema Lenses Industry report also provides essential attributes associated with Cinema Lenses market and act an essential tool to companies active across the value […]

04 Apr 19
NOC SENSEI

Trovo sia giusto, dopo aver parlato di Victor Hasselblad e di Zenzaburo Yoshino, dedicare uno spazio apposito a Telemaco Corsi, Avvocato romano ideatore della Rectaflex, rivoluzionaria reflex italiana apparsa alla fine degli anni ’40. Il personaggio di Corsi e la storia della Rectaflex hanno numerosi aspetti in comune con quella di Hasselblad e Yoshino e […]

03 Apr 19
Film and Digital Times

CVP has been doing business for 30 years in the United Kingdom and Europe. Now they have opened a veritable playground for camera crews in a unique showroom in Newman Street, London. Their CVP Fitzrovia townhouse is called CVP Creative Experience and has five floors of production equipment from major manufacturers, including Sony, Canon, ARRI, RED, ZEISS, Panasonic, Blackmagic and many more.

With NAB 2019 approaching, it’s good to review CVP’s impressive showing at BSC Expo 2019. Their exhibit serves as a model for many expos to come. The exhibit area was thoughtfully laid out–with lots of space and room to move. There was a lens bar, Macro area with little live creatures, studio setup area on tripods and heads, handheld arena, gimbal and drone park, monitor wall, and an enormous bar and lounge area.

02 Apr 19
Casual Photophile

“After a few weeks with a Pentax 50mm lens, I had the feeling of suffocating. I realized that I needed a wide angle. As soon as I had my Zeiss Flektogon, the world looked very different.” Words spoken by Joel Meyerowitz on the Flektogon, and how it completely altered his photographic vision. During World War II there […]

02 Apr 19
TheaterByte

The gritty side of Queens, NY is explored as a private eye searches for a missing woman who was intimately involved with a local politician in this strong indie film debut.

29 Mar 19
The Beat: A Blog by PremiumBeat
Want to know about the cameras behind Netflix Originals? Here are the cameras Netflix has officially approved — and the films and series using them. It’s been a while since we’ve talked about the Netflix camera standards and the shows using them. Let’s take a look at the updated requirements, as well as what the latest Netflix shows are using. Netflix Camera Requirements Cameras must have a true 4K UHD sensor (equal to or greater than 3840 photosites wide). The capture requirements allow for RAW (REDCODE, ARRIRAW, etc) as well as COMPRESSED (XAVC, ProRes, or other I-Frame capable formats). Netflix also requires a minimum of 16-bit Linear or 10-bit Log processing, and minimum data-rate of Bitrate of 240 Mbps at 23.98 fps. Cameras that don’t meet these standards must be approved by Netflix, and are allowed in certain use cases like crash cams, POV, drones, and underwater. Approved Netflix Cameras Since our last report, Netflix added a few new cameras to its approved list, including the Panasonic AU-EVA1, Canon C700 FF, Sony broadcast cameras, and additional RED cameras. Netflix also maintained the traditional (and confusing) RED camera names that have since changed to the DSMC2 BRAIN with select sensors. Note that this isn’t a comprehensive list, and other cameras are allowed by require approval. (Kodachrome was captured on Super 35.) Here is the list of approved cameras. ARRI Alexa 65 6K — 6560 x 3100 ARRIRAW ARRI Alexa LF 4.5K — 4448 x 3096 ARRIRAW ProRes 422 HQ (or higher) Blackmagic URSA Mini 4.6K 4.6K — 4608 x 2592 CinemaDNG RAW Blackmagic URSA Mini Pro 4.6K 4.6K — 4608 x 2592 CinemaDNG RAW Canon C300 MK II 4K — 4096 x 2160 Canon RAW XF-AVC (4K) Canon C500 4K — 4096 x 2160 Canon RAW Canon C700 4.5 K — 4512 x 2376 4K — 4096 x 2160 Canon RAW XF-AVC (4K) ProRes HQ (4K) Canon C700 FF RAW FF — 5952 x 3140 RAW 2.35 — 5952 x 2532 4K — 4096 x 2160 UHD — 3840 x 2160 Canon RAW XF-AVC (4K) ProRes HQ (4K) Panasonic VariCam 35 4K — 4096 x 2160 V-RAW AVC-Intra4K Panasonic VariCam LT 4K — 4096 x 2160 V-RAW AVC-Intra4K Panasonic VariCam Pure 4K — 4096 x 2160 V-RAW Panasonic AU-EVA1 4K — 4096 x 2160 All-Intra 400 Firmware 2.02 or higher required Panavision DXL2 8K — 8192 x 4320 REDCODE RAW RED WEAPON VV 8K (Monstro, Dragon) 8K — 8192 x 4320 REDCODE RAW  RED WEAPON 8K S35 (Helium) 8K — 8192 x 4320 REDCODE RAW RED EPIC-W 8K S35 (Helium) 8K — 8192 x 4320 REDCODE RAW RED WEAPON 6K (Dragon) 6K — 6144 x 3160 REDCODE RAW RED EPIC 6K (Dragon) 6K — 6144 x 3160 REDCODE RAW RED EPIC-W 5K S35 (Gemini) 5K — 5120 x 2700 REDCODE RAW RED SCARLET-W 5K (Dragon) 5K — 5120 x 2700 REDCODE RAW RED RAVEN 4.5K (Dragon) 4.5K — 4608 x 2160 REDCODE RAW Sony Venice 6K — 6048 x 4032 RAW X-OCN XAVC-I Sony F55 4K — 4096 x 2160 F55RAW X-OCN XAVC-I (4K) Sony F65 4K — 4096 x 2160 F65RAW F65RAW-LITE XAVC (4K) Sony FS7 / FS7 II 4K — 4096 x 2160 XAVC (4K) Sony HDC-4300 4K 4096 X 2160 4K Baseband Video Sony PXW-Z450 UHD 3840 x 2160 XAVC-I QFHD 300 mode Cameras Behind the Scenes of Popular Netflix Originals Roma Alfonso Cuarón and Yalitza Aparicio as Cleo on the set via Carlos Somonte/Netflix. The 2019 Oscar winner of Best Director, Best Cinematography, and Best Foreign Language Film was captured digitally on the Alexa. Roma Camera Package: ARRI Alexa 65 Prime 65 ARRIRAW Stranger Things Stranger Things 3 Camera Package: RED DSMC2 Monstro 8K Leica Summilux-C Lenses REDCODE RAW Check out this great behind-the-scenes of season two’s cinematography. The Ballad of Buster Scruggs Cinematographer Bruno Delbonnel via Alison Cohen Rosa/Netflix. Buster Scruggs Camera Package: Arri Alexa Mini Arri Alexa XT Studio Zeiss Master Prime Fujinon Alura Lenses 15.5-45 and 30-80 ARRIRAW 3.4K Open Gate In an interview with IndieWire, cinematographer Bruno Delbonnel said: “I was trying to keep things as simple as possible since it was the first time Joel and Ethan Coen were using a digital camera. I’ve never been interested in the new technologies, I always tried to keep thing very simple. Light and framing are more important than the new toys. For years I was using the same package: a set of Cooke S4 lenses, an Arricam, and Kodak 5219. For this project, the closest to this set on digital was the Alexa studio and its optical finder and a set of master primes because of the extra stop I would need on remote locations with a very limited access to big generators. The main challenge for Buster Scruggs was to find a different ‘look’ for the six short stories while keeping the visual idea of an “Illustration book.” Ozark Ozark Camera Package: Panasonic VariCam 35 Cooke S4 Zeiss Super Speed Hawk V-Lite and V-Lite Vintage ’74 Lenses While talking to Awards Daily, DP Ben Kutchins said: “We’re always going for the more subtle version of what anything could be. You never want to hit the audience over the head. The most cinematic, slowburn version is the most interesting version to us. We’re always looking for that thing that’s just beneath the surface that’s a little darker than what you might see at first glance. We want to make the most cinematic version, while also keeping the camera close, and therefore keeping the audience close. So that it feels like a first-person experience. To never rely on the objective viewpoint.” In another interview with Deadline, Kutchines went on to say: “But in terms of how we shot, it was different from TV in that we didn’t use zoom lenses; we were very precise about the focal lengths that we used. In general, the show is shot on a 27 or a 32mm lens. That’s sort of our bread and butter; that’s what we live on. The idea of being a little wider and a little closer to the actors is something that we’ve strived for. So I would say if there is a rule, it’s to get the camera as close to the actor as possible and make it an intimate first-person experience. “We shot the show on a Panasonic VariCam, and the reason we chose that is a combination of needing to shoot on 4K, but also the camera really performs well in low light, and that’s something that we knew we were going to be doing a lot of. Really, there’s an effort on the show to use the least amount of light possible. If I’m looking at something and I’m not quite sure if it’s right, I just turn it off. That’s sort of been my go-to on this show.” Tidying Up with Marie Kondo Tidying Up with Marie Kondo Camera Package: Canon C300 Fujinon Cabrio Cine Zooms (six 19-90mm, three 85-300mm, one 14-35mm) In an interview with Post Perspective, DP Tom Curran shared: “I felt it wasn’t a series we could shoot on prime lenses, but we wanted the look that primes would bring. We ended up working with Fujinon Cabrio Cine Zooms and Canon cameras, which gave us a really filmic look.” As for getting enough light to shoot in small houses: “For the homes and all the movement, we used about 80 Flex lights — paper-thin LED lights that are easily dimmable and quick to install and take down. Even though we had a pretty small crew, we were able to achieve a pretty consistent look.” The Haunting of Hill House The Haunting of Hill House Camera Package: ARRI ALEXA 65 Prime 65 and Prime 65 S Lenses Arrested Development On set of Arrested Development via Saeed Adyani/Netflix. Arrested Development Camera Package: Panasonic VariCam LT (Season 5) Fujinon Cabrio zooms (15-35mm, 19-90mm, and 85-300mm) 10-bit 422 UHD (3840×2160) AVC Intra files at 23.98-fps. V-Log (with V-709 LUT on set) RED Epic (Season 4) Angenieux Optimo Lenses Panasonic AJ-HDC27 Varicam (Previous Seasons) Cinematographer Patrick Stewart gave insight to the production. When hired for Arrested Development, the first request Stewart approached Hurwitz with was to add a third camera. Shooting with three cameras with multiple characters can be a logistical challenge, but Stewart felt he could get through scenes more quickly, and effectively, in order to get the actors out on time. “I call the C-camera the center camera and the A and the B are screen left and screen right,” Stewart explains. “C covers the center P.O.V., while A and B cover the scene from their left and right side P.O.V., which usually starts with overs. As we continue to shoot the scene, each camera will get tighter and tighter. If there are 3 or more actors in the scene, C will get tighter on whoever is in the center. After that, C camera might cover the scene following the dialogue with ‘swinging’ singles. If no swinging singles are appropriate then the center camera can move over and help out coverage on the right or left side.” You can read this great in-depth piece over on Indie Shooter. Black Mirror Black Mirror Camera Packages: ARRI ALEXA (Season 1) RED Epic (Seasons 2-3) ARRI ALEXA 65 (Season 4 + Bandersnatch) RED Dragon (USS Callister, additional episodes) Sony F55 (used as second/third camera) 13 Reasons Why 13 Reasons Why Camera Package: Panasonic VariCam 35 (Season one) Hawk V-Lite Leica Summilux-C Lenses Panavision Millennium DXL (Season two) Red Helium 8K (Season two) In an interview with Pro Video Coalition, cinematographer Andrij Parekh said: “Understanding that we had to shoot 4K, I tested the Alexa 65, the Sony F55, and the Varicam. The Alexa 65 was glorious — but the camera was just too big for the style of the show (a lot of handheld and moving fast). I preferred the skin tones of the Varicam to the F55, and then I discovered the dual ISO feature of the Varicam — 800 and 5000 ISO. I tested both ISOs and the 5000 was incredibly ‘clean,’ with very little video artifacts or digital noise.” The Crown The Crown Camera Package:  Sony F55 Vintage Cooke Speed Panchros Tiffen Glimmer Glass While sharing behind-the-scenes information with the ASC Magazine, Adriano Goldman said: “When I joined, I was told that Netflix demands a 4K workflow from beginning to end, so I tested the Sony F55, the Sony F65, and the Red Dragon…the F55 was the smallest and easiest camera to work with, so it felt like the best way to go.” Lost in Space Lost in Space Camera Package: RED Weapon 8K Leica Summilux-C Primes In an interview with British Cinematographer, DP Sam McCurdy shares: “I’ve been a believer in Red for some years and applaud the way they try to develop new technologies to suit new ways of filming…We tested the Helium extensively and it was quickly apparent that there was nothing else out there like this in terms of its modern look.” He went on to say: “Although we deployed two Weapons, we shot the show as a single-camera drama. We used very little handheld or Steadicam and instead went back to basics. We didn’t want the new gimmicks like fancy 360-degree shoots. I felt we needed to be intimate with the family and their drama, and we were there to photograph that.” Narcos: Mexico Narcos: Mexico Camera Package:  Red DSMC2 Dragon Hawk V‑Lites (28, 35, 45, 55, 65, 80, 110, and 140mm lenses) Hawk Vintage ’74 anamorphic lenses DJI Inspire 1 (drone shots) While talking with Vantage Film, cinematographer Luis Sansans shared: “For season 4, we changed the look dramatically. After consulting with the producers, we decided to switch to anamorphic lenses and a 2:1 aspect ratio, which is between the 16:9 frame used previously and the full 2.40:1 of standard anamorphic.” Chilling Adventures of Sabrina Chilling Adventures of Sabrina Camera Package: RED Helium 8K Panavision G Series – Ultragold Series Anamorphic GLOW GLOW Camera Package: RED Dragon (Season 1) RED Weapon 8K S35 (Season 2) Cooke Anamorphic /i Prime Lenses In a conversation with Indie Wire, cinematographer Christian Sprenger shares: “The look of GLOW is meant to transport the audience to a grounded realistic setting of 1980s Los Angeles and then at specific times, to the elevated fantasy world of professional wrestling. Along with a custom film LUT from LightIron LA, the slightly imprecise quality of Cooke anamorphic lenses paired with the resolution of the Red felt like the perfect way to reference the audience’s nostalgia for ’80s cinema. Because we’re using modern technology, shooting at a t2.3 on the lenses and very higher ISOs on the camera, I was able to light very naturally and atmospherically instead of traditional ‘TV lighting.’ My goal was for the base of the show to feel very understated and mature so that when we did chose to heighten the aesthetic, there would be strong a stylistic contrast. That became a very powerful storytelling device throughout the season while still grounding the overall narrative and performances.” All images via Netflix. For more gear posts like this, check out these articles: The Cameras and Lenses Behind HBO’s Original Series The Cameras and Lenses Behind 2019’s Oscar-Nominated Films Building The Ultimate, High-Versatility Cinema Camera Package The Cameras Behind Netflix’s Original Films and Series (2017-2018)
26 Mar 19
MarketPresswire

  (I-BusinessNews.Com, March 26, 2019 ) Cinema Lenses are used to record continuous motion and are used to shoot video and digital broadcasts. Sony accounted for 22.084% of the global cinema lenses production volume market share in 2017. Other players accounted for 18.429%, 18.786% individually, such as Zeiss and Canon. Global giant manufactures mainly distributed […]

25 Mar 19
Electronic Device

The new research from Global QYResearch on Cine Lenses Market Share Report for 2019 intends to offer target audience with the fresh outlook on market and fill in the knowledge gaps with the help of processed information and opinions from industry experts. The information in the research report is well-processed and a report is accumulated […]

25 Mar 19
Electronic Device

The new research from Global QYResearch on Digital Cinema Lens Market Share Report for 2019 intends to offer target audience with the fresh outlook on market and fill in the knowledge gaps with the help of processed information and opinions from industry experts. The information in the research report is well-processed and a report is […]

22 Mar 19
Film and Digital Times

We now came to the high point of the visit: a meeting mechanical, styling, electronic and software engineers who designed VENICE at the Sony Atsugi Technology Center.