Apple Bottoms

22 Jul 19
The Technovore

The hub that does it all?

22 Jul 19
My C-SPOT

When the founder of a startup company shuts down her or his business, it’s customary to pen an essay that tells the rest of the community what went wrong. Call it a failure post-mortem. Nine out of 10 startups fail, which is why the failure post-mortem has become so common that it’s practically a Silicon […]

22 Jul 19
Shall We Get Dressed Now?

These are a list of ten things I have found make life easier when you are mobility limited: 1/ Litter picker/grab sticks. I can’t over state how useful I find these. Do look for ones that have a decent grip. They are still limited by two things, your strength and the weight of what you […]

22 Jul 19
Newsy Today

CLOSE There is a high demand for index funds, and 401 (k) textile retirement plans are significant. They are also dependent on technical stocks. (Photo: Getty Images) Ten years into the stock market town, it is wise to be alert to overheating signs. Although the economy is constantly expanding – and no market downturn seems […]

22 Jul 19
Living With a Sleeve

Polly has a lot of choice when it comes to crispbread and crackers these days (sorry – I couldn’t resist…). After a sleeve, lots of people feel that they can’t eat crispbreads or crackers as they’re carbohydrates or they’re slider foods, but it’s not always true. You just need to know which are the best […]

22 Jul 19
Technicboon

We decided to make a detailed review of this extraordinary mobile device, which by the New Year holidays has greatly reduced in price. As a result, UMIDIGI A3 Pro looked very attractive for those who appreciate the optimal price-quality ratio in the product, and according to this parameter, UMIDIGI products are one of the finest. […]

22 Jul 19
TheKrazyCrazyLifeofKass

Tuesday, June 24, 2415 | Sunset Valley, Valverde “Kass, is that you?” Every step across the hot sand of Old Pier Beach sent pangs of regret from the bottoms of her feet all the way up her leg. Kass winced, wishing she had the sense to wear flip flops or sandals for a midday romp […]

22 Jul 19
Noreen’s Keto Kitchen & Life

Keto, Low Carb, Gluten Free, Dairy Free, Grain Free, Diabetic Friendly & Sugar Free!!! Keto Crock Pot Pulled Pork by Noreen’s Keto Kitchen & Life! Pulled Pork Ingredients: 4-5 pound piece of fresh Bone-In Pork Shoulder (Picnic shoulder or pork butt) 1 cup of Apple Cider Vinegar ( Apple Cider Vinegar Organic ) 2 Tablespoons […]

22 Jul 19
PIMP your life

My friend sent me a message today, asking if her ACV (Apple Cider Vinegar) was bad. After looking at her photos I really couldn’t tell. I then thought to myself, “Can ACV even go bad?” “Wait, how long has mine been in the cupboard”. So of course, I had to investigate.

22 Jul 19
scoreit.online

Sponsored Links Guillaume Payen/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images Tinder is exploring a different approach to fighting app store fees — it’s simply ignoring what the store operators want. The dating giant has introduced a default payment process into its Android app that skips Google Play’s system entirely, instead taking payments directly. And if you go […]

22 Jul 19
Boston Herald
Within hours of Pearl Harbor, President Franklin Roosevelt began summoning the heads of American industry to Washington. Roosevelt knew the country would need an unprecedented buildup of planes, ships and other war material. Without hesitation, American companies responded. Ford, Packard, Chrysler, 3M, Hormel, General Mills, Pillsbury, Cargill, Boeing and many other major U.S. companies gave their all to the war effort. At Roosevelt’s request, the president of General Motors even left his company to oversee the war production effort as a lieutenant general in the U.S. Army. Roosevelt’s initial request for 50,000 new airplanes per year was openly mocked by the Germans as outlandishly high and impossible to achieve. But the mighty U.S. industrial base roared to life and pulled it off. By war’s end, the United States was producing 100,000 warplanes a year. U.S. industry literally transformed itself to save our country. It’s fair to wonder if our current CEOs would do the same. Would American companies in a new globalized economy drop everything for their country? Do American companies even consider themselves American anymore? The Daily Caller News Foundation asked 19 of the biggest names in corporate America if they saw themselves as “American” companies. It shouldn’t be a very hard question to answer. But 10 of the 19 — including Amazon, Apple, Chevron and General Electric — refused to answer altogether. The others mostly gave weasel answers. Only General Motors and the bank JPMorgan Chase were willing to clearly identify as American institutions. And even with them, the actual record is cause for concern. Billionaire tech investor Peter Thiel brought this issue to light recently when he accused Google of “seemingly treasonous” behavior for cozying up to the communist Chinese government. Amazingly, Google has been working on a censored search engine: Project Dragonfly, built for the Chinese government and designed to keep the Chinese people from seeing a free flow of information. At the same time, Google refused to work with the U.S. military. Thiel suggested that the FBI and CIA should investigate Google, which seems like a good place to start. More broadly, though, can we really call Google an American company? Google and many other U.S.-based companies have operations, sales and customers all over the world. They think of themselves globally. They value the bottom line above all. A dollar made in China is the same as a dollar made in America. The question for America is whether this is sustainable. Every big company has a Washington office dedicated to influencing U.S. government policy and regulation. With our increasingly powerful government and regulatory regime, it’s smart for companies to do this, and there is nothing wrong with it in theory. But now that corporate America is pushing Washington for its often globalist positions instead of for policies that benefit Americans, we may have a real crisis on our hands. We’re not talking about just a few corporate offices. Washington is completely dominated by corporate America. Big companies fund the influential trade associations all over Washington and hire lobbyists all over Congress and the regulatory agencies. These lobbyists understand our increasingly complex labyrinth of regulations. And they are often writing the laws Congress enacts. Think tanks are supposed to be independently analyzing and commenting on our policies. But who do you think funds the think tanks in Washington? Corporate America dominates in this sphere as well. When they want a new law or to stop a law or regulation they don’t like, these companies go even further, hiring public relations firms and ad agencies to convince us of their positions. All of this is a multibillion-dollar business. Lately, when senators and representatives leave Congress, they go to work for the corporate influence machine. Over two-thirds of the congresspersons who retired or lost their seats this last election cycle are now corporate lobbyists. That’s a record level. A seat in Congress has become an extended tryout for a high-paying corporate influence job. All of this would be of less concern if corporate interests still aligned with actual American interests, but those days seem to have ended sometime between the great industrial ramp-up for World War II and Google’s recent siding with communist China over the U.S. military. Where does this leave the American people? Tucker Carlson and Neil Patel co-founded The Daily Caller.
22 Jul 19
Hours of Idleness-A Photographer's Journey in St. Louis

— Virginia is a state where the Nation’s history unfolds, but it is also a place of great natural beauty and strong, local community. It is home to saltwater sunrises, cool mountain mists, and almost everything in-between. If you read Virginia Sublime Part 1, then you already know how this survey of the State is […]