Arts

23 Mar 19
Cassie Cee Art
23 Mar 19
Succulent Garden Art

Haworthia is a large genus of small succulent plants endemic to Southern Africa. Like the aloes, they are members of the subfamily Asphodeloideae and they generally resemble miniature aloes, except in their flowers, which are distinctive in appearance. They are popular garden and container projects. Generally easy to grow, the same best practices that yield […]

23 Mar 19
Metro
Which is your favourite? GameCentral readers discuss their greatest in-game achievements, from platinum-ing Dark Souls to Call Of Duty’s mile high club. The subject for this week’s Hot Topic was suggested by reader Tom Meadows, who asked which in-game reward did you find the most satisfying to get and how long did it take you? How much do you care about achievements in general and what inspires you to go after the more difficult or time-consuming ones? Although most people claimed not to obsess over achievements almost everyone seemed to make exceptions for games they particularly liked, often as a means to extend its running time to as long as possible.   [metro-fact-box title=”Time extension” colour=”grey” icon=”no-icon”] I’ve always been mildly against Achievements and Trophies. Not to the point where I hate them or anything but I never bothered with them on purpose and always thought people that were obsessed with them were weird. But occasionally, if it’s a game I really like, I will make the effort, as a last ditch attempt to drag out something that I just don’t want to end. The last game I did this with was The Witcher 3. Getting 100% was extremely time-consuming, especially getting all the Gwent cards, but it gave an excuse to explore the world some more and made it seem like the game hadn’t quite finished yet, even though it really had. I’m not sure pride is exactly the word I’d used, as it was all a bit silly and a waste of time really, but I enjoyed it and appreciated the excuse it gave to extend the life of a favourite game even further. Wiggum [/metro-fact-box]   [metro-fact-box title=”Much practice” colour=”grey” icon=”no-icon”] I’m a PlayStation 4 owner with a fair number of Trophies. I can generally take or leave them, but I do think that on certain occasions they’re worth pursuing and can add to the challenge of playing games. I was quite proud of getting the Platinums on Dark Souls (I to III) and Bloodborne. My fond memories of Head Over Heels meant I just had to get the platinum on Lumo, which was inspired by that great 8-bit game. I managed to do so after much, much practice. I also got the same top achievement on Bleed 2 which took some doing, believe me. Treguard ‘The Dungeon Master’ [/metro-fact-box]   [metro-fact-box title=”Switch it off” colour=”grey” icon=”no-icon”] I could not care less about Trophies/Achievements. To me it turns gaming from an organic experience into a checklist of busy work, just to hear that plink and feel rewarded. I turned the notification off a long time ago, and I’d advise others to try it. I understand that it’s a way to add longevity to a game, but I much prefer when games reward achievement with more gameplay or tangible rewards. I good recent example of this is Resident Evil 2 (game of the year already?) which gave me stuff like Hunk mode to suffer through and not just a metaphorical pat on the head. I think this restrictiveness is why an achievement system has been ignored by Nintendo, Miyamoto pretty much said it himself; ‘I’m not a big fan of using the carrots to motivate people to play. I want people to play because they enjoy playing and want to play more.’ ANON [/metro-fact-box]   E-mail your comments to: gamecentral@ukmetro.co.uk   [metro-fact-box title=”Feeling pushed” colour=”grey” icon=”no-icon”] I don’t know if it’s just me but Achievements feel like they’re more of an Xbox 360 era thing than current gen, even though of course they’re still going on. But for some reason, perhaps because of the annoucement of Back 4 Blood, the one that sprung to mind for me with this Hot Topic was the first Left 4 Dead. You had to beat ever campaign on expert and with nobody taking any damage from special Infected. Probably also reminded me because of that crazy story about the guy beating all the SoulsBorne games without taking a hit. I’m not pretending what I did was quite that impressive but it sure did tax my abilities to the max. It’s good to feel you’re being pushed though, stops you getting bored with games – the one you’re playing and the concept in general. I’m not an Achievement junkie or anything but I’d rather have them there than not as they can add a lot to a game, especially one that’s naturally replayable anyway. Wag [/metro-fact-box]   [metro-fact-box title=”Unexpected Achievement” colour=”grey” icon=”no-icon”] I cannot say that I am proud of any of my Achievements and Trophies, not even the Platinums. I do however like it when they pop, especially if it is unexpected. So I am going off on a slight tangent and will instead discuss the Achievement that has impressed me most. This is similar to Bioshock’s ‘Irony’, but I prefer it as I got it without knowing the objectives. I was trying to do a good, pacifist, completion on the first Dishonored and encountered someone who would help me if I gave him the code to a safe. I immediately did not like the guy but helping him appeared to be the only way to proceed on the pacifist path. After some deliberation I got the safe code and gave it to him, however I cleared the safe out beforehand. Doing this yields an Achievement called ‘The Art of the Steal’ and that is the Achievement that has impressed me most as I was not expecting it. PazJohnMitch [/metro-fact-box]   [metro-fact-box title=”Extra tension” colour=”grey” icon=”no-icon”] I think the one I’m most proud of, or at least enjoyed doing was Dead Space 2. You had to finish it on hardcore difficulty, which meant you could only save three times. I’m really not that great at games so I’m sure that’s nothing to Dark Souls experts but to me it was extremely difficult and I would be constantly worrying about whether I should save now or not. When you die you go back to your last save, so you don’t lose everything like ironman mode or anything, so I guess it wasn’t really that impressive an achievement. But to me it was something to be proud of and added a lot to the tension and stress of an already scary game! Breekie [/metro-fact-box]   Catch up on every previous Games Inbox here   [metro-fact-box title=”The final ping” colour=”grey” icon=”no-icon”] The achievement I’m most proud of is the Platinum Trophy I got for Dark Souls. I don’t usually bother much about Trophies or Achievements, if one pops up it’s a surprise but I decided halfway though my first play through of Dark Souls to have a crack at it. Looking back, I must have been nuts because my gaming abilities are only average, especially when it comes to the toe-to-toe stuff and the requirements to get some of the Trophies are ‘out there’ in terms of difficulty. As if collecting all Pyromancies, Sorceries, and Miracles isn’t enough you have to be in the right place at the right time and fulfil certain criteria to get some of them. The real doozy though is the Knights Honour Trophy which requires you to get all the special weapons and there are 41 of them. Some are drops but some you can only get by converting boss souls to make the weapon which means you have to defeat some of the bosses more than once, as in Quelaag’s Fury Sword and the Chaos Blade. I remember very well converting the last weapon I needed for this Trophy, I must have checked it 10 or more times before pressing the button. It was the final Trophy I needed for the Platinum and it was a huge relief when it popped up followed shortly after by the ping for the Platinum. What surprised me was how I felt at the time. After all the time and effort invested I expected to be jumping up and down with glee but I didn’t, I felt regret and kind of sad that it was all over. Gill C. [/metro-fact-box]   E-mail your comments to: gamecentral@ukmetro.co.uk   The small print New Inbox updates appear twice daily, every weekday morning and afternoon. Readers’ letters are used on merit and may be edited for length. You can also submit your own 500 to 600-word 4Player viewer features at any time, which if used will be shown in the next available weekend slot. You can also leave your comments below and don’t forget to follow us on Twitter.
23 Mar 19
Daily News
Legenary Mt. San Antonio College baseball coach Art Mazmanian, who won an NCAA title as a player at USC and coached many years in the minor leagues and also was part of the coaching staff for Team USA during the 1984 Olympics, died on Friday in San Dimas. He was 91. During his playing days Mazmanian was an All-American second baseman on the USC Trojans’ 1948 national championship team, and was the Trojans’ first four-year letterman since 1915. In the 1948 College World Series championship series against Yale, which featured first baseman George H.W. Bush, who later went on to become President at the United States, Mazmanian hit .545 in the CWS as it went on to win the school’s first national title. In 1949, Mazmanian was drafted by the New York Yankees and signed for $4,000. That same year, the Yankees signed Mickey Mantle for $1,100. Jim McConnell, who wrote a “Then and Now” column for this publication, described it as only he could during a 2011 article. “Mantle went on to have a Hall of Fame career. Mazmanian has gone on to have a Hall of Fame life,” McConnell wrote. Indeed he did. Mazmanian, who graduated at Dorsey High in Los Angeles and was a coach there, was the baseball coach at Mt. SAC for 31 years from 1968-98, where his teams won 709 games and only had two losing seasons. More than 120 of his players played professionally, including players that went on to play in Major League Baseball such as Doug Bird, Ron Roenicke, Rob Nelson, Brett Tomko and Terry Clark. “He was one of the most beloved people on the planet,” said Debbie Cavion, associate athletics director at Mt. SAC, who had coached soccer on a field adjacent to Mazmanian. “He was a beautiful soul who only had kind things to say. People from all over the country knew him and loved him.” Mazmanian, who practically every year would coach for Mt. SAC and then coach a short-season in Major League baseball’s minor leagues, took a leave of absence while with the Baltimore Orioles organization in 1984 so he could serve as an assistant coach for the United States Olympic baseball team that competed in the Olympic Games in Los Angeles. Even though Mazmanian retired from Mt. SAC in 1999 when his wife Shirley was ill, he returned to coaching at South Hills High for five years and helped the Huskies win a CIF-SS divisional title in 2009. He finished his coaching career as an assistant coach at Claremont-Mudd-Scripps in 2016 when he was 88. “We are deeply saddened to hear of the passing of Coach Mazmanian,” said Mt. SAC President Bill Scroggins. “Coach Maz was an inspirational leader on and off the field. He was dedicated to Mt. SAC and the craft of baseball, but most of all, he was passionate about his students. People of all ages learned a great deal about baseball and life from this incredible man. On behalf of the Board of Trustees and the entire Mt. SAC family, we extend our condolences.” Maz, as we was known, spent six years playing in the minor leagues from 1949-54 and was mostly in the New York Yankees’ farm system, including 2 1/2 years with the Triple-A Kansas City Blues of the  American Association, but he never made it to the big leagues. While he was coaching at Mt. SAC, Mazmanian also was coaching in the minor leagues, a career that spanned from, 1949-87. During the 1960s, Mazmanian scouted for the Oakland Athletics and the Cleveland Indians. He started coaching again in 1971 and had his best success later in the decade with the Yankees organization as manager of their short season Class-A New York–Penn League affiliate, the Oneonta Yankees. He guided the O-Yankees to five straight division championships (1977–81) and four playoff championships (1977; 1979–81). He compiled a minor league managing record of 663-487. He is survived by his son, Stephen, and daughter, Nancy (who served in baseball public relations roles at USC and with the Anaheim Angels).  He was predeceased by his wife, Shirley. Services are pending, with information expected early next week.  In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations to the Art Mazmanian Memorial Fund, Mt. SAC Foundation, 1100 No. Grand Ave., Walnut, Calif. 91789.
23 Mar 19
Redlands Daily Facts
Legenary Mt. San Antonio College baseball coach Art Mazmanian, who won an NCAA title as a player at USC and coached many years in the minor leagues and also was part of the coaching staff for Team USA during the 1984 Olympics, died on Friday in San Dimas. He was 91. During his playing days Mazmanian was an All-American second baseman on the USC Trojans’ 1948 national championship team, and was the Trojans’ first four-year letterman since 1915. In the 1948 College World Series championship series against Yale, which featured first baseman George H.W. Bush, who later went on to become President at the United States, Mazmanian hit .545 in the CWS as it went on to win the school’s first national title. In 1949, Mazmanian was drafted by the New York Yankees and signed for $4,000. That same year, the Yankees signed Mickey Mantle for $1,100. Jim McConnell, who wrote a “Then and Now” column for this publication, described it as only he could during a 2011 article. “Mantle went on to have a Hall of Fame career. Mazmanian has gone on to have a Hall of Fame life,” McConnell wrote. Indeed he did. Mazmanian, who graduated at Dorsey High in Los Angeles and was a coach there, was the baseball coach at Mt. SAC for 31 years from 1968-98, where his teams won 709 games and only had two losing seasons. More than 120 of his players played professionally, including players that went on to play in Major League Baseball such as Doug Bird, Ron Roenicke, Rob Nelson, Brett Tomko and Terry Clark. “He was one of the most beloved people on the planet,” said Debbie Cavion, associate athletics director at Mt. SAC, who had coached soccer on a field adjacent to Mazmanian. “He was a beautiful soul who only had kind things to say. People from all over the country knew him and loved him.” Mazmanian, who practically every year would coach for Mt. SAC and then coach a short-season in Major League baseball’s minor leagues, took a leave of absence while with the Baltimore Orioles organization in 1984 so he could serve as an assistant coach for the United States Olympic baseball team that competed in the Olympic Games in Los Angeles. Even though Mazmanian retired from Mt. SAC in 1999 when his wife Shirley was ill, he returned to coaching at South Hills High for five years and helped the Huskies win a CIF-SS divisional title in 2009. He finished his coaching career as an assistant coach at Claremont-Mudd-Scripps in 2016 when he was 88. “We are deeply saddened to hear of the passing of Coach Mazmanian,” said Mt. SAC President Bill Scroggins. “Coach Maz was an inspirational leader on and off the field. He was dedicated to Mt. SAC and the craft of baseball, but most of all, he was passionate about his students. People of all ages learned a great deal about baseball and life from this incredible man. On behalf of the Board of Trustees and the entire Mt. SAC family, we extend our condolences.” Maz, as we was known, spent six years playing in the minor leagues from 1949-54 and was mostly in the New York Yankees’ farm system, including 2 1/2 years with the Triple-A Kansas City Blues of the  American Association, but he never made it to the big leagues. While he was coaching at Mt. SAC, Mazmanian also was coaching in the minor leagues, a career that spanned from, 1949-87. During the 1960s, Mazmanian scouted for the Oakland Athletics and the Cleveland Indians. He started coaching again in 1971 and had his best success later in the decade with the Yankees organization as manager of their short season Class-A New York–Penn League affiliate, the Oneonta Yankees. He guided the O-Yankees to five straight division championships (1977–81) and four playoff championships (1977; 1979–81). He compiled a minor league managing record of 663-487. He is survived by his son, Stephen, and daughter, Nancy (who served in baseball public relations roles at USC and with the Anaheim Angels).  He was predeceased by his wife, Shirley. Services are pending, with information expected early next week.  In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations to the Art Mazmanian Memorial Fund, Mt. SAC Foundation, 1100 No. Grand Ave., Walnut, Calif. 91789.
23 Mar 19
Orange County Register
Legenary Mt. San Antonio College baseball coach Art Mazmanian, who won an NCAA title as a player at USC and coached many years in the minor leagues and also was part of the coaching staff for Team USA during the 1984 Olympics, died on Friday in San Dimas. He was 91. During his playing days Mazmanian was an All-American second baseman on the USC Trojans’ 1948 national championship team, and was the Trojans’ first four-year letterman since 1915. In the 1948 College World Series championship series against Yale, which featured first baseman George H.W. Bush, who later went on to become President at the United States, Mazmanian hit .545 in the CWS as it went on to win the school’s first national title. In 1949, Mazmanian was drafted by the New York Yankees and signed for $4,000. That same year, the Yankees signed Mickey Mantle for $1,100. Jim McConnell, who wrote a “Then and Now” column for this publication, described it as only he could during a 2011 article. “Mantle went on to have a Hall of Fame career. Mazmanian has gone on to have a Hall of Fame life,” McConnell wrote. Indeed he did. Mazmanian, who graduated at Dorsey High in Los Angeles and was a coach there, was the baseball coach at Mt. SAC for 31 years from 1968-98, where his teams won 709 games and only had two losing seasons. More than 120 of his players played professionally, including players that went on to play in Major League Baseball such as Doug Bird, Ron Roenicke, Rob Nelson, Brett Tomko and Terry Clark. “He was one of the most beloved people on the planet,” said Debbie Cavion, associate athletics director at Mt. SAC, who had coached soccer on a field adjacent to Mazmanian. “He was a beautiful soul who only had kind things to say. People from all over the country knew him and loved him.” Mazmanian, who practically every year would coach for Mt. SAC and then coach a short-season in Major League baseball’s minor leagues, took a leave of absence while with the Baltimore Orioles organization in 1984 so he could serve as an assistant coach for the United States Olympic baseball team that competed in the Olympic Games in Los Angeles. Even though Mazmanian retired from Mt. SAC in 1999 when his wife Shirley was ill, he returned to coaching at South Hills High for five years and helped the Huskies win a CIF-SS divisional title in 2009. He finished his coaching career as an assistant coach at Claremont-Mudd-Scripps in 2016 when he was 88. “We are deeply saddened to hear of the passing of Coach Mazmanian,” said Mt. SAC President Bill Scroggins. “Coach Maz was an inspirational leader on and off the field. He was dedicated to Mt. SAC and the craft of baseball, but most of all, he was passionate about his students. People of all ages learned a great deal about baseball and life from this incredible man. On behalf of the Board of Trustees and the entire Mt. SAC family, we extend our condolences.” Maz, as we was known, spent six years playing in the minor leagues from 1949-54 and was mostly in the New York Yankees’ farm system, including 2 1/2 years with the Triple-A Kansas City Blues of the  American Association, but he never made it to the big leagues. While he was coaching at Mt. SAC, Mazmanian also was coaching in the minor leagues, a career that spanned from, 1949-87. During the 1960s, Mazmanian scouted for the Oakland Athletics and the Cleveland Indians. He started coaching again in 1971 and had his best success later in the decade with the Yankees organization as manager of their short season Class-A New York–Penn League affiliate, the Oneonta Yankees. He guided the O-Yankees to five straight division championships (1977–81) and four playoff championships (1977; 1979–81). He compiled a minor league managing record of 663-487. He is survived by his son, Stephen, and daughter, Nancy (who served in baseball public relations roles at USC and with the Anaheim Angels).  He was predeceased by his wife, Shirley. Services are pending, with information expected early next week.  In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations to the Art Mazmanian Memorial Fund, Mt. SAC Foundation, 1100 No. Grand Ave., Walnut, Calif. 91789.
23 Mar 19
San Gabriel Valley Tribune
Legenary Mt. San Antonio College baseball coach Art Mazmanian, who won an NCAA title as a player at USC and coached many years in the minor leagues and also was part of the coaching staff for Team USA during the 1984 Olympics, died on Friday in San Dimas. He was 91. During his playing days Mazmanian was an All-American second baseman on the USC Trojans’ 1948 national championship team, and was the Trojans’ first four-year letterman since 1915. In the 1948 College World Series championship series against Yale, which featured first baseman George H.W. Bush, who later went on to become President at the United States, Mazmanian hit .545 in the CWS as it went on to win the school’s first national title. In 1949, Mazmanian was drafted by the New York Yankees and signed for $4,000. That same year, the Yankees signed Mickey Mantle for $1,100. Jim McConnell, who wrote a “Then and Now” column for this publication, described it as only he could during a 2011 article. “Mantle went on to have a Hall of Fame career. Mazmanian has gone on to have a Hall of Fame life,” McConnell wrote. Indeed he did. Mazmanian, who graduated at Dorsey High in Los Angeles and was a coach there, was the baseball coach at Mt. SAC for 31 years from 1968-98, where his teams won 709 games and only had two losing seasons. More than 120 of his players played professionally, including players that went on to play in Major League Baseball such as Doug Bird, Ron Roenicke, Rob Nelson, Brett Tomko and Terry Clark. “He was one of the most beloved people on the planet,” said Debbie Cavion, associate athletics director at Mt. SAC, who had coached soccer on a field adjacent to Mazmanian. “He was a beautiful soul who only had kind things to say. People from all over the country knew him and loved him.” Mazmanian, who practically every year would coach for Mt. SAC and then coach a short-season in Major League baseball’s minor leagues, took a leave of absence while with the Baltimore Orioles organization in 1984 so he could serve as an assistant coach for the United States Olympic baseball team that competed in the Olympic Games in Los Angeles. Even though Mazmanian retired from Mt. SAC in 1999 when his wife Shirley was ill, he returned to coaching at South Hills High for five years and helped the Huskies win a CIF-SS divisional title in 2009. He finished his coaching career as an assistant coach at Claremont-Mudd-Scripps in 2016 when he was 88. “We are deeply saddened to hear of the passing of Coach Mazmanian,” said Mt. SAC President Bill Scroggins. “Coach Maz was an inspirational leader on and off the field. He was dedicated to Mt. SAC and the craft of baseball, but most of all, he was passionate about his students. People of all ages learned a great deal about baseball and life from this incredible man. On behalf of the Board of Trustees and the entire Mt. SAC family, we extend our condolences.” Maz, as we was known, spent six years playing in the minor leagues from 1949-54 and was mostly in the New York Yankees’ farm system, including 2 1/2 years with the Triple-A Kansas City Blues of the  American Association, but he never made it to the big leagues. While he was coaching at Mt. SAC, Mazmanian also was coaching in the minor leagues, a career that spanned from, 1949-87. During the 1960s, Mazmanian scouted for the Oakland Athletics and the Cleveland Indians. He started coaching again in 1971 and had his best success later in the decade with the Yankees organization as manager of their short season Class-A New York–Penn League affiliate, the Oneonta Yankees. He guided the O-Yankees to five straight division championships (1977–81) and four playoff championships (1977; 1979–81). He compiled a minor league managing record of 663-487. He is survived by his son, Stephen, and daughter, Nancy (who served in baseball public relations roles at USC and with the Anaheim Angels).  He was predeceased by his wife, Shirley. Services are pending, with information expected early next week.  In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations to the Art Mazmanian Memorial Fund, Mt. SAC Foundation, 1100 No. Grand Ave., Walnut, Calif. 91789.
23 Mar 19
Press Telegram
Legenary Mt. San Antonio College baseball coach Art Mazmanian, who won an NCAA title as a player at USC and coached many years in the minor leagues and also was part of the coaching staff for Team USA during the 1984 Olympics, died on Friday in San Dimas. He was 91. During his playing days Mazmanian was an All-American second baseman on the USC Trojans’ 1948 national championship team, and was the Trojans’ first four-year letterman since 1915. In the 1948 College World Series championship series against Yale, which featured first baseman George H.W. Bush, who later went on to become President at the United States, Mazmanian hit .545 in the CWS as it went on to win the school’s first national title. In 1949, Mazmanian was drafted by the New York Yankees and signed for $4,000. That same year, the Yankees signed Mickey Mantle for $1,100. Jim McConnell, who wrote a “Then and Now” column for this publication, described it as only he could during a 2011 article. “Mantle went on to have a Hall of Fame career. Mazmanian has gone on to have a Hall of Fame life,” McConnell wrote. Indeed he did. Mazmanian, who graduated at Dorsey High in Los Angeles and was a coach there, was the baseball coach at Mt. SAC for 31 years from 1968-98, where his teams won 709 games and only had two losing seasons. More than 120 of his players played professionally, including players that went on to play in Major League Baseball such as Doug Bird, Ron Roenicke, Rob Nelson, Brett Tomko and Terry Clark. “He was one of the most beloved people on the planet,” said Debbie Cavion, associate athletics director at Mt. SAC, who had coached soccer on a field adjacent to Mazmanian. “He was a beautiful soul who only had kind things to say. People from all over the country knew him and loved him.” Mazmanian, who practically every year would coach for Mt. SAC and then coach a short-season in Major League baseball’s minor leagues, took a leave of absence while with the Baltimore Orioles organization in 1984 so he could serve as an assistant coach for the United States Olympic baseball team that competed in the Olympic Games in Los Angeles. Even though Mazmanian retired from Mt. SAC in 1999 when his wife Shirley was ill, he returned to coaching at South Hills High for five years and helped the Huskies win a CIF-SS divisional title in 2009. He finished his coaching career as an assistant coach at Claremont-Mudd-Scripps in 2016 when he was 88. “We are deeply saddened to hear of the passing of Coach Mazmanian,” said Mt. SAC President Bill Scroggins. “Coach Maz was an inspirational leader on and off the field. He was dedicated to Mt. SAC and the craft of baseball, but most of all, he was passionate about his students. People of all ages learned a great deal about baseball and life from this incredible man. On behalf of the Board of Trustees and the entire Mt. SAC family, we extend our condolences.” Maz, as we was known, spent six years playing in the minor leagues from 1949-54 and was mostly in the New York Yankees’ farm system, including 2 1/2 years with the Triple-A Kansas City Blues of the  American Association, but he never made it to the big leagues. While he was coaching at Mt. SAC, Mazmanian also was coaching in the minor leagues, a career that spanned from, 1949-87. During the 1960s, Mazmanian scouted for the Oakland Athletics and the Cleveland Indians. He started coaching again in 1971 and had his best success later in the decade with the Yankees organization as manager of their short season Class-A New York–Penn League affiliate, the Oneonta Yankees. He guided the O-Yankees to five straight division championships (1977–81) and four playoff championships (1977; 1979–81). He compiled a minor league managing record of 663-487. He is survived by his son, Stephen, and daughter, Nancy (who served in baseball public relations roles at USC and with the Anaheim Angels).  He was predeceased by his wife, Shirley. Services are pending, with information expected early next week.  In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations to the Art Mazmanian Memorial Fund, Mt. SAC Foundation, 1100 No. Grand Ave., Walnut, Calif. 91789.
23 Mar 19
Jordan Cronk

Originally published in Fireflies #3, Spring 2016 Zhao Tao’s first appearance in a film by Jia Zhangke features the actress, back turned to the camera, addressing an audience from the middle of a stage. Zhao’s role in Platform, Jia’s second feature, was her acting debut. In the decade-and-a-half since its release she’s appeared on a variety […]

23 Mar 19
SCNG
Legenary Mt. San Antonio College baseball coach Art Mazmanian, who won an NCAA title as a player at USC and coached many years in the minor leagues and also was part of the coaching staff for Team USA during the 1984 Olympics, died on Friday in San Dimas. He was 91. During his playing days Mazmanian was an All-American second baseman on the USC Trojans’ 1948 national championship team, and was the Trojans’ first four-year letterman since 1915. In the 1948 College World Series championship series against Yale, which featured first baseman George H.W. Bush, who later went on to become President at the United States, Mazmanian hit .545 in the CWS as it went on to win the school’s first national title. In 1949, Mazmanian was drafted by the New York Yankees and signed for $4,000. That same year, the Yankees signed Mickey Mantle for $1,100. Jim McConnell, who wrote a “Then and Now” column for this publication, described it as only he could during a 2011 article. “Mantle went on to have a Hall of Fame career. Mazmanian has gone on to have a Hall of Fame life,” McConnell wrote. Indeed he did. Mazmanian, who graduated at Dorsey High in Los Angeles and was a coach there, was the baseball coach at Mt. SAC for 31 years from 1968-98, where his teams won 709 games and only had two losing seasons. More than 120 of his players played professionally, including players that went on to play in Major League Baseball such as Doug Bird, Ron Roenicke, Rob Nelson, Brett Tomko and Terry Clark. “He was one of the most beloved people on the planet,” said Debbie Cavion, associate athletics director at Mt. SAC, who had coached soccer on a field adjacent to Mazmanian. “He was a beautiful soul who only had kind things to say. People from all over the country knew him and loved him.” Mazmanian, who practically every year would coach for Mt. SAC and then coach a short-season in Major League baseball’s minor leagues, took a leave of absence while with the Baltimore Orioles organization in 1984 so he could serve as an assistant coach for the United States Olympic baseball team that competed in the Olympic Games in Los Angeles. Even though Mazmanian retired from Mt. SAC in 1999 when his wife Shirley was ill, he returned to coaching at South Hills High for five years and helped the Huskies win a CIF-SS divisional title in 2009. He finished his coaching career as an assistant coach at Claremont-Mudd-Scripps in 2016 when he was 88. “We are deeply saddened to hear of the passing of Coach Mazmanian,” said Mt. SAC President Bill Scroggins. “Coach Maz was an inspirational leader on and off the field. He was dedicated to Mt. SAC and the craft of baseball, but most of all, he was passionate about his students. People of all ages learned a great deal about baseball and life from this incredible man. On behalf of the Board of Trustees and the entire Mt. SAC family, we extend our condolences.” Maz, as we was known, spent six years playing in the minor leagues from 1949-54 and was mostly in the New York Yankees’ farm system, including 2 1/2 years with the Triple-A Kansas City Blues of the  American Association, but he never made it to the big leagues. While he was coaching at Mt. SAC, Mazmanian also was coaching in the minor leagues, a career that spanned from, 1949-87. During the 1960s, Mazmanian scouted for the Oakland Athletics and the Cleveland Indians. He started coaching again in 1971 and had his best success later in the decade with the Yankees organization as manager of their short season Class-A New York–Penn League affiliate, the Oneonta Yankees. He guided the O-Yankees to five straight division championships (1977–81) and four playoff championships (1977; 1979–81). He compiled a minor league managing record of 663-487. He is survived by his son, Stephen, and daughter, Nancy (who served in baseball public relations roles at USC and with the Anaheim Angels).  He was predeceased by his wife, Shirley. Services are pending, with information expected early next week.  In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations to the Art Mazmanian Memorial Fund, Mt. SAC Foundation, 1100 No. Grand Ave., Walnut, Calif. 91789.
23 Mar 19
Graphic Policy

DC’s eagerly awaited young adult publishing line, DC Ink, launches on April 2 with the release of Mera: Tidebreaker by New York Times bestselling author Danielle Paige and art by Stephen Byrne. Engaging fans across the country for a national book tour, Paige will participate in a series of intimate and honest conversations with a selection of acclaimed young […]

23 Mar 19
FutureSTRONG Academy

– AGES 11 to 18 – All Summer – 5/27/2019 – 8/2/2019, MONDAY through FRIDAY, 9am – 3pm – FLEXIBLE timing – Half Day (Morning or Afternoon) and 3/4/5 Day options available – Only MORNING (9-12) or AFTERNOON (12-3) timings also available at request – EARLY drop off and Late pick up; $9/hour before 9am […]

23 Mar 19
Musical in Life

The MBC drama “Eyes of Dawn” which was aired on MBC from Oct. 7, 1991 to Feb. 6, 1992, garnered high popularity (average viewer rating of 44.3 percent), has been revived with a musical of the same title. The musical “Eyes of Dawn” will be performed at the Seoul D Cube Art Center from March […]

23 Mar 19
Fashion Ka Fatka

Bollywood star Akshay Kumar is known for his fitness along with martial arts expertise! Recently he was spotted together with his wife along with his daughter Nitara at airport!