Auerhahn

06 Dec 18
Santa Cruz Sentinel
Mountain View’s minimum wage will rise to $15.65 beginning Jan.1 after an attempt to keep it at $15 until 2020 failed. The increase, adjusted for inflation, is in line with Sunnyvale, which made the decision to move to $15.65 in September. The two cities, which moved to $15 an hour at the start of 2018, will continue to have the highest minimum wage in Santa Clara County next year. Councilman John McAlister at Tuesday’s City Council meeting requested that the wage be kept at $15 for another year so the city could study the impacts of the planned wage increase on local small businesses. He said enacting the freeze would align with an approach sought by the Cities Association of Santa Clara County that all cities be at a $15 minimum wage in 2019. “If we continue to go down this path, we will become an island,” McAlister said. “Let’s take a pause and make sure that everybody comes along.” McAlister’s request didn’t receive support from any of the other members and it died before coming to a vote. Councilwoman Margaret Abe-Koga argued that stalling the inflation adjustment wouldn’t put Mountain View in line with a regional approach because seven cities aren’t yet on board. While San Jose, Palo Alto, Cupertino, Los Altos, Santa Clara and Milpitas are moving to $15 an hour in the new year, others such as Los Altos Hills, Monte Sereno, Gilroy, Morgan Hill and Saratoga trail behind. “If you want to talk about a regional approach, we should be looking to get those other seven cities to join us,” Abe-Koga said. “Either way, we’re still not at a regional approach, so I don’t think that argument works at this point in time. … Let’s encourage the other cities to come up with us in the future.” Three members of the public spoke in favor of adjusting the wage upward at the meeting, stating that the freeze was being considered just four weeks before minimum wage-earners were expecting an increase that for a couple renting together in the city would amount to an additional $2,500 in 2019. “We’ve got to help people keep their wages up to be able to afford to live here,” said Louise Auerhahn[cq comment=” cq”], of Working Partnerships USA. Councilman Ken Rosenberg added that Mountain View’s high minimum wage next year will give small employers access to more potential employees. “If there is a disparity between Palo Alto and Mountain view for minimum wage, that is a benefit for Mountain View businesses,” Rosenberg said. From July 2015 — when Mountain View adopted the goal of hitting $15 an hour by 2018 — to the present, the minimum wage has increased by 47 percent.
05 Dec 18
The Mercury News
Mountain View’s minimum wage will rise to $15.65 beginning Jan.1 after an attempt to keep it at $15 until 2020 failed. The increase, adjusted for inflation, is in line with Sunnyvale, which made the decision to move to $15.65 in September. The two cities, which moved to $15 an hour at the start of 2018, will continue to have the highest minimum wage in Santa Clara County next year. Councilman John McAlister at Tuesday’s City Council meeting requested that the wage be kept at $15 for another year so the city could study the impacts of the planned wage increase on local small businesses. He said enacting the freeze would align with an approach sought by the Cities Association of Santa Clara County that all cities be at a $15 minimum wage in 2019. “If we continue to go down this path, we will become an island,” McAlister said. “Let’s take a pause and make sure that everybody comes along.” McAlister’s request didn’t receive support from any of the other members and it died before coming to a vote. Councilwoman Margaret Abe-Koga argued that stalling the inflation adjustment wouldn’t put Mountain View in line with a regional approach because seven cities aren’t yet on board. While San Jose, Palo Alto, Cupertino, Los Altos, Santa Clara and Milpitas are moving to $15 an hour in the new year, others such as Los Altos Hills, Monte Sereno, Gilroy, Morgan Hill and Saratoga trail behind. “If you want to talk about a regional approach, we should be looking to get those other seven cities to join us,” Abe-Koga said. “Either way, we’re still not at a regional approach, so I don’t think that argument works at this point in time. … Let’s encourage the other cities to come up with us in the future.” Three members of the public spoke in favor of adjusting the wage upward at the meeting, stating that the freeze was being considered just four weeks before minimum wage-earners were expecting an increase that for a couple renting together in the city would amount to an additional $2,500 in 2019. “We’ve got to help people keep their wages up to be able to afford to live here,” said Louise Auerhahn[cq comment=” cq”], of Working Partnerships USA. Councilman Ken Rosenberg added that Mountain View’s high minimum wage next year will give small employers access to more potential employees. “If there is a disparity between Palo Alto and Mountain view for minimum wage, that is a benefit for Mountain View businesses,” Rosenberg said. From July 2015 — when Mountain View adopted the goal of hitting $15 an hour by 2018 — to the present, the minimum wage has increased by 47 percent.
03 Dec 18
Santa Cruz Sentinel
Women working in Santa Clara County are paid just 62 cents for every $1 their male peers get, the largest gender income gap in the Bay Area and the third largest in California. Less than 50 miles north, women in San Francisco County are paid 83 cents for every $1 men make, according to data on median wages for employed workers 16 and older from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2017 American Community Survey. That gap between the two counties is significant: It means the median wage for women working in Santa Clara County is about $14,600 less annually than it is for women working in San Francisco. For men, it’s a different story: Their median wage in Santa Clara County is $300 more annually than it is for men working in San Francisco. So how did the county whose largest city was dubbed “the feminist capital of the world” back in the 1970s end up with such a large gender pay gap? That’s not entirely clear. Stephen Levy, director and senior economist at the Center for the Continuing Study of the California Economy, said he doesn’t have an explanation. Only two other counties in California have a larger gender wage gap: Madera and Lake. In Alameda and San Mateo counties, women make 78 cents for every $1 men are paid. In Contra Costa County, women are paid 70 cents for every $1 their male peers make. Louise Auerhahn, with the labor think tank Working Partnerships USA, said the disparity may be driven in part by differences in which industries men and women work coupled with the fact that Santa Clara County’s population is more diverse than San Francisco County’s. “We have a segment of very well paid jobs and a very large segment of low paying jobs,” Auerhahn said. “Many women, and especially women of color and immigrant women, are in that low-paid sector.” The highest-paid jobs in Santa Clara County, according to the data, are in computers and mathematics, where the median annual wage is $126,200. Women in that sector make 76 cents for every $1 men are paid. But women make up only 22 percent of the workers in that highly paid sector, a challenge tech companies have been working for years to address. Meanwhile, working women make up 81 percent of the Santa Clara County workers in health care support, which has an annual median wage of $36,400. In that sector, women earn 84 cents for every $1 male peers earn. Auerhahn analyzed census data and found Hispanic women face the largest income disparity in the county. They have a median annual wage of about $25,300. That’s 28 percent of the median annual wage for white males in Santa Clara County. “We’re a very diverse county, and some of the groups that predominate here tend to have a larger wage gap, not so much with men of the same ethnicity but a gap compared with white men,” she said. Santa Clara County is 26 percent Hispanic and 31 percent white, according to the census, while San Francisco County is 15 percent Hispanic and 40 percent white. Auerhahn said that’s why efforts to increase pay for low-wage workers could help close the gender gap. She pointed to a 2016 study from the University of California Berkeley that found that increasing the minimum wage in Santa Clara County to $15 an hour would affect 36 percent of working women, compared to just 27 percent of working men. Sunnyvale and Mountain View reached a $15 per hour minimum wage this year. San Jose, Los Altos, Cupertino and Palo Alto increased their minimum wage rates this year to $13.50 per hour — part of plans across those cities to bring the minimum wage to $15 by 2019. Cindy Chavez, vice chair of the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors, said she wants county government to take a proactive role in addressing gender pay disparity, using strategies that include peer mentors. “Pay equity and this wage gap is a problem that belongs to everybody, and that’s why it’s so incumbent upon government to take a leadership role in resolving it,” Chavez said. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”curated” curated_ids=”5702529,4948753″]Last year, the Board of Supervisors approved recommendations to improve pay equity in county government jobs and among county contractors. The county also adopted a policy that allows it to disqualify any potential contractors who have violated pay-equity laws in the previous five years. “I’ve never seen, in my adult life, women so ready to change that dynamic,” she said. “So this is an exciting time to be part of the women’s movement.” Still, it likely will be an uphill climb. In the past three years, Santa Clara County’s gender disparity has actually grown, from 67 percent in 2015 to 62 percent in 2017.
03 Dec 18
The Mercury News
Women working in Santa Clara County are paid just 62 cents for every $1 their male peers get, the largest gender income gap in the Bay Area and the third largest in California. Less than 50 miles north, women in San Francisco County are paid 83 cents for every $1 men make, according to data on median wages for employed workers 16 and older from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2017 American Community Survey. That gap between the two counties is significant: It means the median wage for women working in Santa Clara County is about $14,600 less annually than it is for women working in San Francisco. For men, it’s a different story: Their median wage in Santa Clara County is $300 more annually than it is for men working in San Francisco. So how did the county whose largest city was dubbed “the feminist capital of the world” back in the 1970s end up with such a large gender pay gap? That’s not entirely clear. Stephen Levy, director and senior economist at the Center for the Continuing Study of the California Economy, said he doesn’t have an explanation. Only two other counties in California have a larger gender wage gap: Madera and Lake. In Alameda and San Mateo counties, women make 78 cents for every $1 men are paid. In Contra Costa County, women are paid 70 cents for every $1 their male peers make. Louise Auerhahn, with the labor think tank Working Partnerships USA, said the disparity may be driven in part by differences in which industries men and women work coupled with the fact that Santa Clara County’s population is more diverse than San Francisco County’s. “We have a segment of very well paid jobs and a very large segment of low paying jobs,” Auerhahn said. “Many women, and especially women of color and immigrant women, are in that low-paid sector.” The highest-paid jobs in Santa Clara County, according to the data, are in computers and mathematics, where the median annual wage is $126,200. Women in that sector make 76 cents for every $1 men are paid. But women make up only 22 percent of the workers in that highly paid sector, a challenge tech companies have been working for years to address. Meanwhile, working women make up 81 percent of the Santa Clara County workers in health care support, which has an annual median wage of $36,400. In that sector, women earn 84 cents for every $1 male peers earn. Auerhahn analyzed census data and found Hispanic women face the largest income disparity in the county. They have a median annual wage of about $25,300. That’s 28 percent of the median annual wage for white males in Santa Clara County. “We’re a very diverse county, and some of the groups that predominate here tend to have a larger wage gap, not so much with men of the same ethnicity but a gap compared with white men,” she said. Santa Clara County is 26 percent Hispanic and 31 percent white, according to the census, while San Francisco County is 15 percent Hispanic and 40 percent white. Auerhahn said that’s why efforts to increase pay for low-wage workers could help close the gender gap. She pointed to a 2016 study from the University of California Berkeley that found that increasing the minimum wage in Santa Clara County to $15 an hour would affect 36 percent of working women, compared to just 27 percent of working men. Sunnyvale and Mountain View reached a $15 per hour minimum wage this year. San Jose, Los Altos, Cupertino and Palo Alto increased their minimum wage rates this year to $13.50 per hour — part of plans across those cities to bring the minimum wage to $15 by 2019. Cindy Chavez, vice chair of the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors, said she wants county government to take a proactive role in addressing gender pay disparity, using strategies that include peer mentors. “Pay equity and this wage gap is a problem that belongs to everybody, and that’s why it’s so incumbent upon government to take a leadership role in resolving it,” Chavez said. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”curated” curated_ids=”5702529,4948753″]Last year, the Board of Supervisors approved recommendations to improve pay equity in county government jobs and among county contractors. The county also adopted a policy that allows it to disqualify any potential contractors who have violated pay-equity laws in the previous five years. “I’ve never seen, in my adult life, women so ready to change that dynamic,” she said. “So this is an exciting time to be part of the women’s movement.” Still, it likely will be an uphill climb. In the past three years, Santa Clara County’s gender disparity has actually grown, from 67 percent in 2015 to 62 percent in 2017.
03 Dec 18
East Bay Times
Women working in Santa Clara County are paid just 62 cents for every $1 their male peers get, the largest gender income gap in the Bay Area and the third largest in California. Less than 50 miles north, women in San Francisco County are paid 83 cents for every $1 men make, according to data on median wages for employed workers 16 and older from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2017 American Community Survey. That gap between the two counties is significant: It means the median wage for women working in Santa Clara County is about $14,600 less annually than it is for women working in San Francisco. For men, it’s a different story: Their median wage in Santa Clara County is $300 more annually than it is for men working in San Francisco. So how did the county whose largest city was dubbed “the feminist capital of the world” back in the 1970s end up with such a large gender pay gap? That’s not entirely clear. Stephen Levy, director and senior economist at the Center for the Continuing Study of the California Economy, said he doesn’t have an explanation. Only two other counties in California have a larger gender wage gap: Madera and Lake. In Alameda and San Mateo counties, women make 78 cents for every $1 men are paid. In Contra Costa County, women are paid 70 cents for every $1 their male peers make. Louise Auerhahn, with the labor think tank Working Partnerships USA, said the disparity may be driven in part by differences in which industries men and women work coupled with the fact that Santa Clara County’s population is more diverse than San Francisco County’s. “We have a segment of very well paid jobs and a very large segment of low paying jobs,” Auerhahn said. “Many women, and especially women of color and immigrant women, are in that low-paid sector.” The highest-paid jobs in Santa Clara County, according to the data, are in computers and mathematics, where the median annual wage is $126,200. Women in that sector make 76 cents for every $1 men are paid. But women make up only 22 percent of the workers in that highly paid sector, a challenge tech companies have been working for years to address. Meanwhile, working women make up 81 percent of the Santa Clara County workers in health care support, which has an annual median wage of $36,400. In that sector, women earn 84 cents for every $1 male peers earn. Auerhahn analyzed census data and found Hispanic women face the largest income disparity in the county. They have a median annual wage of about $25,300. That’s 28 percent of the median annual wage for white males in Santa Clara County. “We’re a very diverse county, and some of the groups that predominate here tend to have a larger wage gap, not so much with men of the same ethnicity but a gap compared with white men,” she said. Santa Clara County is 26 percent Hispanic and 31 percent white, according to the census, while San Francisco County is 15 percent Hispanic and 40 percent white. Auerhahn said that’s why efforts to increase pay for low-wage workers could help close the gender gap. She pointed to a 2016 study from the University of California Berkeley that found that increasing the minimum wage in Santa Clara County to $15 an hour would affect 36 percent of working women, compared to just 27 percent of working men. Sunnyvale and Mountain View reached a $15 per hour minimum wage this year. San Jose, Los Altos, Cupertino and Palo Alto increased their minimum wage rates this year to $13.50 per hour — part of plans across those cities to bring the minimum wage to $15 by 2019. Cindy Chavez, vice chair of the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors, said she wants county government to take a proactive role in addressing gender pay disparity, using strategies that include peer mentors. “Pay equity and this wage gap is a problem that belongs to everybody, and that’s why it’s so incumbent upon government to take a leadership role in resolving it,” Chavez said. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”curated” curated_ids=”5702529,4948753″]Last year, the Board of Supervisors approved recommendations to improve pay equity in county government jobs and among county contractors. The county also adopted a policy that allows it to disqualify any potential contractors who have violated pay-equity laws in the previous five years. “I’ve never seen, in my adult life, women so ready to change that dynamic,” she said. “So this is an exciting time to be part of the women’s movement.” Still, it likely will be an uphill climb. In the past three years, Santa Clara County’s gender disparity has actually grown, from 67 percent in 2015 to 62 percent in 2017.
04 Nov 18
Parish Mouse

COVENTRY. BARRAS LANE. Baum, M. ; Watch manufacturer. CHAPEL FIELDS. Cohen, P. ; Watch manufacturer. FLEET STREET. Margolies, S. ; Complete house-furnisher. HOLYHEAD ROAD. Friedlander, A. E. ; Watch manufacturer. SPON STREET. Silverston, F. ; (Retired.) THE BUTTS. Radges, M. & J., Argyle House ; Watch manfrs. UNION STREET. Auerhahn ; Foreign correspondent. Kalker, E. […]

04 Sep 18
waysofthinking.co.uk

Eichmann takes notes during his trial. ‘Unthinking respect for authority is the greatest enemy of truth.’  Albert Einstein. 1961, Jerusalem: the year of the Eichmann trial. Hannah Arendt, philosopher, political thinker and journalist, was there. She subsequently reported on the trial for The New Yorker and her perceptions are important to consider in terms of ways […]

04 Sep 18
waysofthinking.co.uk

Eichmann takes notes during his trial. ‘Unthinking respect for authority is the greatest enemy of truth.’  Albert Einstein. 1961, Jerusalem: the year of the Eichmann trial. Hannah Arendt, philosopher, political thinker and journalist, was there. She subsequently reported on the trial for The New Yorker and her perceptions are important to consider in terms of ways […]

15 Oct 18
Deep Doo from Zaabo

"Shira Auerhahn, Eric Berk" by Unknown Author via NYT https://t.co/bSB7TdAeOG — Zaabo Cole (@ZaaboCole) October 15, 2018 https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js from Twitter https://twitter.com/ZaaboCole October 15, 2018 at 12:17AM via IFTTT

15 Oct 18

By Unknown Author The couple met in 2016 on JDate, and had their first date in West Hollywood, Calif. Published: October 14, 2018 at 05:30AM from NYT Fashion & Style https://ift.tt/2yDh4Dq via IFTTT

14 Oct 18
Technologynews

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14 Oct 18
Technologynews

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14 Oct 18
Breaking News Headlines Local

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14 Oct 18
Focus News Agency

By Unknown Author The couple met in 2016 on JDate, and had their first date in West Hollywood, Calif. Published: October 14, 2018 at 01:00AM from NYT Fashion & Style https://ift.tt/2yDh4Dq via IFTTT