Auerhahn

03 May 19
YDP - your daily picture

It’s been exciting weeks of travel and blurry re-entry and then, towards the end of this week, another successful attempt at anchoring in the place where I always find solace: Sauvie Island. A portion of the island that is closed off for winter to allow migratory birds to rest and breed, opens at the beginning […]

20 Apr 19
Archy Worldys

POWELL – Leslie Schreiber slowed as the horizontal snow covered a rare paved road north of Rawlins. But the wildlife biologist did not want to stop. This could have been 1000 days in the life of the biologist of the Wyoming Game and Fish Department, but it was anything but an average day. This writer […]

15 Feb 19
/ EXPERIENCE OF THINKING / EXPÉRIENCE DE PENSÉE / ESPERIENZA DI PENSIERO /

BeatSuperNova Rinaldo Rasa four years old on the Lambretta, 1954 – Ponzano Veneto – Italia     i am listing the beat generation since 1997     BeatsupernovaList Maria Grazia Accorsi jack kerouac as gourmet what eat sal paradiso on the road– essay on apple pie sellerio editore —courtesy newspaper laRepubblica Carl Adkins * * […]

31 Jan 19
East Bay Times
Months after it surfaced that workers on a high rise in downtown San Jose were held in captivity and forced to work without pay, the City Council is expected to consider stronger wage protections to prevent companies from refusing to pay employees what they deserve. In a memo to the city’s Rules and Open Government Committee, several members of the San Jose City Council — Raul Peralez, Chappie Jones, Magdalena Carrasco and Sergio Jimenez — suggested broadening the city’s current wage theft protections to cover construction workers on both public and private projects. They also said developers proposing construction projects involving more than 5,000 square feet of floor area should have to disclose wage theft violations by their contractors and subcontractors. If companies are found to have unpaid wage theft claims, the council members argued, they should be disqualified until the claims are paid. In July, the U.S. Labor Department announced that more than a dozen immigrants working on the Silvery Towers project at the corner of N. San Pedro and W. St. James streets were held in squalid conditions in a Hayward house and forced to work on projects across the Bay Area. The changes, the council members wrote, “will ensure that another Silvery Towers does not occur again and that the city is not blindsided by another atrocity.” Under normal circumstances, the proposal would have been discussed by the committee and then moved on to the full council for consideration. But several years ago, three of the council members discussed wage theft protections, an inadvertent violation of the Brown Act, which outlines open meeting requirements for local governments, said City Attorney Rick Doyle. Ultimately, Doyle said, the committee couldn’t discuss the issue, but could refer it to the March 1 priority setting meeting, where the council will lay out, in order, goals for the coming months. Construction workers and labor groups urged the council to make broadening its wage theft policy a priority. However, business groups warned doing so could create demanding new regulations for developers and hamper the city’s aim of adding thousands of new affordable homes in the next few years. “It is the ethical and quite honestly the honorable thing to do,” said Steve Flores, with the group Santa Clara County Residents for Responsible Development, adding that the update would close “gaping loopholes” that leave construction workers fending for themselves. The vast majority of workers who win wage theft judgments never actually recover their earnings. And according to the council members’ memo, one in six California construction workers is a victim of wage theft. That’s especially true for immigrants. Companies regularly refuse to pay for overtime or misclassify workers as independent contractors. Since 2011, the memo says, some 7,000 construction workers at more than 500 companies in the Bay Area alone have been the victim of wage theft. The city, said Louise Auerhahn of Working Partnerships USA, which advocates for workers, should not tolerate bad employers and “should be lifting up” honest contractors. But Eddie Truong of the Silicon Valley Organization, a business-advocacy group, said the proposed changes would have unintended consequences by adding “onerous” regulations that would force developers to navigate a web of bureaucracy. Scott Knies of the San Jose Downtown Association agreed. The proposal, he said, was “way too broad.” “The city manager’s going to need a new office” just to deal with the paperwork, Knies said, adding, “You really need to think about the implementation.” Both sides will have another chance to make their case in a few weeks when the council sets its priorities. Forest Peterson, a doctoral student at Stanford University who studies wage theft, said he was encouraged to see San Jose considering the issue. Protecting workers, he said, is “something that San Jose can show leadership on.”
31 Jan 19
The Mercury News
Months after it surfaced that workers on a high rise in downtown San Jose were held in captivity and forced to work without pay, the City Council is expected to consider stronger wage protections to prevent companies from refusing to pay employees what they deserve. In a memo to the city’s Rules and Open Government Committee, several members of the San Jose City Council — Raul Peralez, Chappie Jones, Magdalena Carrasco and Sergio Jimenez — suggested broadening the city’s current wage theft protections to cover construction workers on both public and private projects. They also said developers proposing construction projects involving more than 5,000 square feet of floor area should have to disclose wage theft violations by their contractors and subcontractors. If companies are found to have unpaid wage theft claims, the council members argued, they should be disqualified until the claims are paid. In July, the U.S. Labor Department announced that more than a dozen immigrants working on the Silvery Towers project at the corner of N. San Pedro and W. St. James streets were held in squalid conditions in a Hayward house and forced to work on projects across the Bay Area. The changes, the council members wrote, “will ensure that another Silvery Towers does not occur again and that the city is not blindsided by another atrocity.” Under normal circumstances, the proposal would have been discussed by the committee and then moved on to the full council for consideration. But several years ago, three of the council members discussed wage theft protections, an inadvertent violation of the Brown Act, which outlines open meeting requirements for local governments, said City Attorney Rick Doyle. Ultimately, Doyle said, the committee couldn’t discuss the issue, but could refer it to the March 1 priority setting meeting, where the council will lay out, in order, goals for the coming months. Construction workers and labor groups urged the council to make broadening its wage theft policy a priority. However, business groups warned doing so could create demanding new regulations for developers and hamper the city’s aim of adding thousands of new affordable homes in the next few years. “It is the ethical and quite honestly the honorable thing to do,” said Steve Flores, with the group Santa Clara County Residents for Responsible Development, adding that the update would close “gaping loopholes” that leave construction workers fending for themselves. The vast majority of workers who win wage theft judgments never actually recover their earnings. And according to the council members’ memo, one in six California construction workers is a victim of wage theft. That’s especially true for immigrants. Companies regularly refuse to pay for overtime or misclassify workers as independent contractors. Since 2011, the memo says, some 7,000 construction workers at more than 500 companies in the Bay Area alone have been the victim of wage theft. The city, said Louise Auerhahn of Working Partnerships USA, which advocates for workers, should not tolerate bad employers and “should be lifting up” honest contractors. But Eddie Truong of the Silicon Valley Organization, a business-advocacy group, said the proposed changes would have unintended consequences by adding “onerous” regulations that would force developers to navigate a web of bureaucracy. Scott Knies of the San Jose Downtown Association agreed. The proposal, he said, was “way too broad.” “The city manager’s going to need a new office” just to deal with the paperwork, Knies said, adding, “You really need to think about the implementation.” Both sides will have another chance to make their case in a few weeks when the council sets its priorities. Forest Peterson, a doctoral student at Stanford University who studies wage theft, said he was encouraged to see San Jose considering the issue. Protecting workers, he said, is “something that San Jose can show leadership on.”
30 Jan 19
AHTEEETEEETE

BeatSuperNova Rinaldo Rasa four years old on the Lambretta, 1954 – Ponzano Veneto – Italia     i am listing the beat generation since 1997     BeatsupernovaList Maria Grazia Accorsi jack kerouac as gourmet what eat sal paradiso on the road– essay on apple pie sellerio editore —courtesy newspaper laRepubblica Carl Adkins * * […]

09 Jan 19
Nachrichten Welt

ichn Monty Python und der Heilige GralEs gibt ein Killerkaninchen, das drei Ritter in einer blutigen Szene besiegt. Es ist witzig, weil Kaninchen so harmlos sind – oder zumindest waren sie es früher. Neue Forschungsergebnisse besagen, dass, obwohl Kaninchen uns nicht bald enthaupten werden, Hasen mit Fleischgeschmack doch nicht mehr so ​​phantasievoll sind. Sie leben […]

13 Dec 18
Onabike.cc

Many resorts will promise you tracks in excess of 100km or even 200km. These claims are all bullshit. There is not even enough space for that. Here’s how they trick you.

06 Dec 18
Santa Cruz Sentinel
Mountain View’s minimum wage will rise to $15.65 beginning Jan.1 after an attempt to keep it at $15 until 2020 failed. The increase, adjusted for inflation, is in line with Sunnyvale, which made the decision to move to $15.65 in September. The two cities, which moved to $15 an hour at the start of 2018, will continue to have the highest minimum wage in Santa Clara County next year. Councilman John McAlister at Tuesday’s City Council meeting requested that the wage be kept at $15 for another year so the city could study the impacts of the planned wage increase on local small businesses. He said enacting the freeze would align with an approach sought by the Cities Association of Santa Clara County that all cities be at a $15 minimum wage in 2019. “If we continue to go down this path, we will become an island,” McAlister said. “Let’s take a pause and make sure that everybody comes along.” McAlister’s request didn’t receive support from any of the other members and it died before coming to a vote. Councilwoman Margaret Abe-Koga argued that stalling the inflation adjustment wouldn’t put Mountain View in line with a regional approach because seven cities aren’t yet on board. While San Jose, Palo Alto, Cupertino, Los Altos, Santa Clara and Milpitas are moving to $15 an hour in the new year, others such as Los Altos Hills, Monte Sereno, Gilroy, Morgan Hill and Saratoga trail behind. “If you want to talk about a regional approach, we should be looking to get those other seven cities to join us,” Abe-Koga said. “Either way, we’re still not at a regional approach, so I don’t think that argument works at this point in time. … Let’s encourage the other cities to come up with us in the future.” Three members of the public spoke in favor of adjusting the wage upward at the meeting, stating that the freeze was being considered just four weeks before minimum wage-earners were expecting an increase that for a couple renting together in the city would amount to an additional $2,500 in 2019. “We’ve got to help people keep their wages up to be able to afford to live here,” said Louise Auerhahn[cq comment=” cq”], of Working Partnerships USA. Councilman Ken Rosenberg added that Mountain View’s high minimum wage next year will give small employers access to more potential employees. “If there is a disparity between Palo Alto and Mountain view for minimum wage, that is a benefit for Mountain View businesses,” Rosenberg said. From July 2015 — when Mountain View adopted the goal of hitting $15 an hour by 2018 — to the present, the minimum wage has increased by 47 percent.
05 Dec 18
The Mercury News
Mountain View’s minimum wage will rise to $15.65 beginning Jan.1 after an attempt to keep it at $15 until 2020 failed. The increase, adjusted for inflation, is in line with Sunnyvale, which made the decision to move to $15.65 in September. The two cities, which moved to $15 an hour at the start of 2018, will continue to have the highest minimum wage in Santa Clara County next year. Councilman John McAlister at Tuesday’s City Council meeting requested that the wage be kept at $15 for another year so the city could study the impacts of the planned wage increase on local small businesses. He said enacting the freeze would align with an approach sought by the Cities Association of Santa Clara County that all cities be at a $15 minimum wage in 2019. “If we continue to go down this path, we will become an island,” McAlister said. “Let’s take a pause and make sure that everybody comes along.” McAlister’s request didn’t receive support from any of the other members and it died before coming to a vote. Councilwoman Margaret Abe-Koga argued that stalling the inflation adjustment wouldn’t put Mountain View in line with a regional approach because seven cities aren’t yet on board. While San Jose, Palo Alto, Cupertino, Los Altos, Santa Clara and Milpitas are moving to $15 an hour in the new year, others such as Los Altos Hills, Monte Sereno, Gilroy, Morgan Hill and Saratoga trail behind. “If you want to talk about a regional approach, we should be looking to get those other seven cities to join us,” Abe-Koga said. “Either way, we’re still not at a regional approach, so I don’t think that argument works at this point in time. … Let’s encourage the other cities to come up with us in the future.” Three members of the public spoke in favor of adjusting the wage upward at the meeting, stating that the freeze was being considered just four weeks before minimum wage-earners were expecting an increase that for a couple renting together in the city would amount to an additional $2,500 in 2019. “We’ve got to help people keep their wages up to be able to afford to live here,” said Louise Auerhahn[cq comment=” cq”], of Working Partnerships USA. Councilman Ken Rosenberg added that Mountain View’s high minimum wage next year will give small employers access to more potential employees. “If there is a disparity between Palo Alto and Mountain view for minimum wage, that is a benefit for Mountain View businesses,” Rosenberg said. From July 2015 — when Mountain View adopted the goal of hitting $15 an hour by 2018 — to the present, the minimum wage has increased by 47 percent.