Bad Writing

27 May 19
Indah kustia's blog

The Fault in Our Stars begins with the story of a young woman named Hazel Grace. He is a person who survives a cancer attack that makes his lungs unable to walk normally. His parents suggested that Hazel be able to go to the Support Group. One day at the Support Group, Hazel met a […]

27 May 19
Just Writing

I have had enough. I’ve had enough of the 9 to 5, the sound of keyboards, the smell of tea. I’ve had enough of dark mornings and rain and late busses and tired toddlers in tantrums at my feet. I’ve had enough of debt and overdrafts. I’ve had enough of minimum wage. I’ve had enough […]

27 May 19
diary of a glad white mama

So, you’ve all pondered on that. Quite a few of you. 127 views last night. 👀 👃 but don’t say nothing. It’s always better watching someone else’s life go to sh!t than that of your own. Trust me, I take satisfaction in knowing I’m not the only soul tormented. I realize what is happening. My […]

27 May 19
The Colorado Sun
Eric Perez joined the U.S. Air Force at age 17 because he wanted to help fight the bad guys. He spent the next decade working in military intelligence and as a communications network technician. When he left the service, he went on to earn a bachelor’s degree in accounting, followed by a master’s in accounting. And as an accountant, he was miserable. Especially during tax season. Then he heard about a six-month course at SecureSet in Denver that offered hands-on cybersecurity training on how to get that digital bad guy. “I don’t want to say I have a superhero complex, but it feels that way. I want to save people. I want (my job) to mean something,” said Perez, 39, who graduates in June from SecureSet’s program and hopes to find a job in the Denver area. “This seemed logical, it appealed to my analytical side and went hand in hand with my military training and doing deductive reasoning.” Eric Perez, far right, shared a photo shot after Sept. 11, 2001. Perez was serving in the U.S. Air Force and was “tasked with a secret deployment with two days notice to the Middle East,” he said. He later left the Air Force to become an accountant. He realized that wasn’t what he wanted to do and this year, enrolled in SecureSet, a cybersecurity-focused bootcamp that is training him to fight the digital bad guys. (Provided by Eric Perez) Maybe he’s just wired that way. But coincidentally, about one-third of his class of 22 students are veterans. And SecureSet’s program in Colorado Springs is closer to 100 percent. Something about cybersecurity appeals to some veterans. And that’s a good thing because industry forecasts show that the demand for cybersecurity professionals is growing so fast that by 2021, there will be 3.5 million unfilled cybersecurity jobs. That’s just two years away. “We promote broadly. However, we do get a lot of interest from veterans,” said Bret Fund, a  SecureSet cofounder who estimates that 40% of its students are veterans. “For a lot of them, their time in the military trains them on a lot of principles that resonate with cybersecurity professionals. It’s easy for them to pick up and transition to this space.” These days, nearly any business would benefit from hiring someone trained in fighting off malware threats and cyber attackers. A trained employee could help resolve tech issues, actively prevent online threats and get training for staff, especially those darned employees who click on suspicious email links. But Colorado’s supply of cybersecurity workers is lower than the nation’s, according to CyberSeek, a site with tools to help companies and potential workers better understand the shortage. For each cybersecurity job opening in Colorado, there are 1.8 workers employed in cybersecurity, compared with 2.3 employed nationwide. That means it’s more difficult for Colorado employers to poach cybersecurity workers from competitors, explained Scott Bilttle, spokesman for Burning Glass Technologies, which worked on the CyberSeek data. “So they must look to other tactics — cyber training for current workers, or attracting new talent, for example — to fill their needs,” he said. To tackle the shortage, Boulder-based LogRhythm works with University of Colorado Denver to “create a pipeline of employees,” said James Carder, the company’s chief information security officer. And having served in the Air Force, Carder says he’s also tuned in to the potential of veterans. If veterans are interested in getting into cybersecurity, they should attend local events and get to know members in the working community. Make more journalism like this possible with a Colorado Sun membership, starting at just $5 a month. “I have eyes in the local community on the veteran side,” Carder said. “A good friend is a chief master sergeant in the Air Force, and he asked me to do a presentation on how to transition from the military to the commercial sector. Colorado Springs, that’s a rich talent pool for people coming out of the military.” The 3.5 million worker shortage statistic comes from Cybersecurity Ventures, a research firm that reports on the industry in its Cybercrime Magazine. Since the number was first published in 2017, efforts to address it have been widespread with many universities adding cybersecurity degrees plus startups mixing security training with gaming to lure inexperienced but potential threat hunters. But increased awareness and training opportunities aren’t going to make much of a dent in demand, said Steve Morgan, editor of Cybercrime Magazine. “When street crime goes down, it doesn’t reduce the number of police officers required to safely protect society,” he said in an email. “While phishing campaigns are responsible for a large percentage of total cyber attacks, there’s so many other aspects of cybersecurity that need to be dealt with.” Students at SecureSet in their downtown classrooms, have been immersing themselves in cybersecurity theory and hands-on lab work as well as participating in mock interviews on May 24, 2019, in Denver, Colorado. Many of the students who will soon finish this recent SecureSet program are military veterans. (Kathryn Scott, Special to The Colorado Sun) Cyberfocused in Colorado Springs Colorado Springs, home to five U.S. military bases, began a concentrated effort a few years ago to reach men and women leaving the military. A nine-month research project culminated in a Colorado Springs Chamber & EDC report last August that found the economic benefit of growing the local commercial cybersecurity industry would be $1 billion. “As a result of the research we’ve done, we’ve identified the cybersecurity workforce in this metro areas as 3,000 workers averaging $104,000 in salary,” said Vinnie Persichetti, director of the chamber’s cybersecurity group. “One of the greatest and most in-demand requirements is a security clearance, which shows the scope of support that the industry provides to our local DOD (U.S. Department of Defense) installations and missions.” That has led to renewed efforts to recruit former military. And in Colorado Springs, there are a lot of those folks. “Over the last few years, we’ve averaged between 350 to 500 members of the military who transition every month. The majority come out of Fort Carson,” said Persichetti, himself a retired Air Force sergeant. “One of the reasons why we focus on cybersecurity is to assist the large number of military who want to transition.” Andrew Guerrero, right, a former Coast Guard petty officer second class, discusses his special skill set during a mock interview with Kala Pickett with technical recruiting company Austin Fraser. (Kathryn Scott, Special to The Colorado Sun) The chamber doesn’t have data on how many veterans stick around town but in speaking to military transition offices, Persichetti said they estimate 75 percent want to stay in Colorado Springs. Only about 40% can find a job or jump to a degree program. Several efforts are under way in the city to collaborate and increase training opportunities for ex-military. SecureSet expanded to Colorado Springs in 2017. The region has tech training and cybersecurity programs like LeaderQuest and New Horizons “to offer certifications and a user base to help” Persichetti added. Pikes Peak Community College last year became the city’s fifth college to receive a National Center of Academic Excellence from the National Security Administration (the Denver area, by comparison, has four with Regis University counted in both cities). The designation coincided with a new cybersecurity associate’s degree, created with the help of local security companies. Since spring 2018, 292 students have enrolled in the Pikes Peak degree program, with one-third classified as active duty, military dependents or veterans, according to the school. There’s also the Catalyst Campus in Colorado Springs that houses a number of national-security efforts. One is The Center for Technology, Research and Commercialization, or C-TRAC, which connects private companies to work on cyber and tech issues with cadets at the Air Force Academy’s AF CyberWorx program. Microsoft also has a program aimed at transitioning military to tech jobs and cybersecurity. Not everything on the campus focuses on cybersecurity, but it’s about building relationships between the military and the otherwise unaware commercial sector, said Kevin Kenney, C-TRAC’s program manager for Cyberworx. “We don’t find hesitation largely. We find, for lack of a better word, ignorance. There are a lot of companies who haven’t thought of the government as a market. And we find those who are intimidated by the process. Another thing we do is demystify the process,” Kenney said. And often, it’s a chance to work with veterans. “We don’t look exclusively for veteran entrepreneurs, but we do find a lot of them because a lot of vets know the problems in the military,” he said. “Whatever technology they’re offering or they’ve created often applies to what they knew in the military.” Dave Muench, right, a former staff sergeant in the Army, discusses his special skill set during a mock interview with Kala Pickett with technical recruiting company Austin Fraser. (Kathryn Scott, Special to The Colorado Sun) From lingo to tactics, cybersecurity and military work have a lot in common After David Muench graduates from SecureSet next month, he’ll head back home to Miami where he already has a job as a defense analyst at the U.S. Department of Defence.  He’d taken an educational sabbatical for a year using the GI Bill to fund a year of coding school at Code Fellows in Seattle and then SecureSet, a rare bootcamp focused on cybersecurity. Coding school taught him how to make software work. Cybersecurity training taught him how to break it, since that’s what cyber attackers are constantly doing. And if you’re just coding, you may not realize what else can go wrong. “Here you learn just how easy it is to break everything. It’s terrifying but eye-opening,” said Muench, who spent nine years in the Army and has a background in counterterrorism. “There are a lot of unknown unknowns for coders out there.” Resources: Types of cybersecurity jobs (CyberSeek.org)Cybersecurity resources in Colorado Springs (Colorado Springs Chamber & EDC)Cyber job openings in federal government (U.S. Office of Personnel Management)Microsoft Software & Systems Academy for veteransCyber degree programs in Colorado (Cyber Degrees)Cybertraining for veterans (National Initiative for Cybersecurity Careers and Studies) The common lingo and jargon — threat actor, risk assessment, intelligence — plus a more regimented structure makes it easier for veterans to adapt. The program requires students to attack computers and exploit vulnerabilities, just as a malicious attacker would do. Half the time is spent in labs to get actual practice and hunt down holes in the software, said Fund, with SecureSet. “The industry is also very mission-oriented. Nothing against other areas, but writing code or creating a website isn’t as much of a mission as in cybersecurity where you’re very much defending a company’s assets from cyberattacks,” Fund said. “It’s very attractive to this (ex-military) population.” Muench agrees. While he has a job waiting for him, he’s hoping that his role will morph to include more cybersecurity integration since he better understands threats and how to fight them. “When you leave the military, the desire to still be in the fight doesn’t go away easily,” Muench said. “Being able to contribute in some way, shape or form is intoxicating.” This reporting is made possible by our members. You can directly support independent watchdog journalism in Colorado for as little as $5 a month. Start here: coloradosun.com/join More from The Colorado Sun A cybersecurity worker shortage in Colorado has the industry tapping veterans to fill the gap Here are eight great books by Colorado authors for your summer reading list Message scent: Douglas fir beetles detoured from Ouray forest by pheromone packets Garage sales and GoFundMe campaigns are nice, but Colorado districts want a better fix for school lunch debt Opinion: Let’s find ways to protect students without placing them at additional risk
27 May 19
One More Down

Big groups, small groups, solo experts… it didn’t matter. Something always killed them. – p. 6 Pages 414 Actual Pages 411 I was looking for something pulpy. My library doesn’t have a lot of Gischler (my go-to action/pulp guy) so I scrolled through the New Releases hoping for something. There wasn’t a lot there. But […]

27 May 19

The reason I decided to create this blog was to tell the story of my move from England to Italy and the experiences I have had along the way, good and bad. I am 57, divorced and was offered early release terms from a company I had worked nearly 30 years for. So, I decided to change my life and fulfil a life time ambition. I have always wanted to life somewhere in the Mediterranean area and after many trips to Portugal, Spain, France and Italy I choose Monopoli in Puglia. It is a beautiful town some 40 km south of Bari on the Adriatic coast, but more about Monopoli later. I an a very keen cyclist and ride 50 miles almost everyday and the climate and terrain in Puglia allows me to ride on the flat or enjoy the challenge of climbing. I am not the quickest rider and the hills here are not the hardest, but as I grow old, I will continue to ride as long as my body holds out and allows. The scenery along the coast both north and south is wonderful and once you go in land you are among the olive groves. As you climb and go deeper in land you see the grape vines, cherry and orange groves and the breath-taking countryside. Again, more about the area later. The serious part. I want to use this blog to relate the things you need to know, think about or watch out for if you are considering moving or buying a property in Italy. I will tell and record what you need to consider first before you jump on a plane and buy in Italy. These are common when moving anywhere and it is good to make sure they are on you check list and completed. I will share my experiences of registering in Italy, banking in Italy, estate agents in Italy, properties in Italy, local and national councils, buying a property, arranging a mobile, arranging utilities and lots more from shopping, eating out, local culture, schools for learning Italian (this is really fun) OK this is my first ever blog and I hope to have fun writing it and helping others who my want to live in Italy or buy a property as an investment.

Living my dream in Monopoli Italy
27 May 19
Site Title

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27 May 19
The Colorado Sun
With the recent announcement of another round of Colorado Book Award winners, 2019 has shaped up to be another stellar year for literature by Colorado authors. At SunLit, the weekly feature of The Colorado Sun that showcases the best of the best, we’re proud to publish excerpts and interviews with many of the state’s most accomplished writers. So we decided to ask some of them to recommend one of their favorite books especially suited for the escapist nature of the summer read. This holiday weekend marks at least the unofficial start of summer, as schools let out and the weather warms, and it’s as good a time as any to get that summer reading list in order. With our thanks to these authors, we submit a short list of titles to enrich idle hours or extended vacations. Whether you’re headed for the mountains, the beach or just the back porch, these selections just might offer that getaway you’re looking for. Each week, The Colorado Sun and Colorado Humanities & Center For The Book feature an excerpt from a Colorado book and an interview with the author. Explore the SunLit archives at coloradosun.com/sunlit Helen Thorpe A copy of Denver author Peter Heller’s “The River,” photographed at Cheesman Park in Denver on May 26, 2019. (Eric Lubbers, The Colorado Sun) Helen Thorpe is the author of “The Newcomers: Finding Refuge, Friendship, and Hope in an American Classroom,” a 2018 Colorado Book Awards winner for Creative Nonfiction. Helen’s Pick: “The River” by Peter Heller. Why You Might Like It: “It’s a spell-binder, and makes for perfect summer reading in a place where so many of us like to raft, kayak, or otherwise enjoy rivers full of snowmelt in the summertime. The book also features a raging fire, and of course we are approaching fire season, too. (Hopefully this year we will have fewer fires, given all the snow and rain we have gotten.) I can’t recommend “The River” highly enough — I could not put it down. I especially loved the depiction of the friendship between the book’s two main characters, and the unforgettable beauty of the writing about the natural world.” You Can Find It: At BookBar, The Tattered Cover and Amazon. Mark Stevens Mark Stevens is featured in “Blood Business: Crime Stories from This World and Beyond,” a 2018 Colorado Book Awards finalist for Anthology. Mark’s pick: “KOP” by Warren Hammond. Why You Might Like It: “One of the best mysteries I’ve read in the past few years by a Colorado writer was set on a planet called Lagarto. “KOP” is soaked with atmosphere and steeped in humanity, even though we are on a distant planet six centuries in the future. Corruption and greed have discovered new outer limits of brutality. It’s not easy to pull off an imaginative sci-fi setting and a noir-tinged mystery, but Hammond doesn’t break a sweat fashioning this 3-D world and the planet’s steamy, fetid streets. “Lagarto is a mess. Its economy is in shambles. It’s moral fabric is frayed. Our anti-hero is Juno Mozambe, once the corrupt police chief’s bare-knuckled enforcer. He is rugged, flawed, and relentless. The main case in “KOP” involves the mutilated body of an army lieutenant. Juno gets teamed up with the well-meaning and inexperienced Maggie Orzo. “KOP” is terrific—a gritty escape—and I liked No. 2 in the series, “Ex-KOP,” even better. And No. 3, “KOP Killer,” won the Colorado Book Award for, yes, best mystery. But start with “KOP.” The whole series was recently updated, too, with snazzy new covers that will look great on the airplane or at the beach.” You Can Find It: At BookBar, The Tattered Cover and Amazon. Peg Brantley Peg Brantley is the author of “Trafficked,” the 2018 Colorado Book Awards winner for Thriller. Peg’s Pick: “The Drowning Game” by LS Hawker. Why You Might Like It: “This summer, in between fluff and deep introspection, save room for a little danger. The thriller kind. “Petty Moshen’s father trained her to handle anything—while holding her prisoner for eighteen years. Suddenly her father is dead, but rather than the freedom she expects, her life is about to go from a bad dream to a full-blown nightmare. “The Drowning Game” is a coming-of-age story unlike any you’ve ever read.  When you begin with Hawker’s debut novel featuring a strong and potentially troubled female lead, you’ll want to read her next books as well.” You Can Find It: At BookBar, The Tattered Cover and Amazon.   Margaret Mizushima Margaret Mizushima  is the author of “Hunting Hour: A Timber Creek K-9 Mystery,” a 2018 Colorado Book Awards finalist for Mystery. Margaret’s Pick: “Canyon Sacrifice” by Scott Graham. Why You Might Like It: “Each episode combines a mixture of great writing, vivid landscape descriptions, and a well-crafted mystery that’s sure to keep you turning the pages. Even if you’ve chosen to stay home during your summer vacation, these stories will take you on a thrill ride to America’s National Parks. “Graham has written five books in the series. The fifth, “Arches Enemy,” is set in Arches National Park where archeologist Chuck Bender travels to help uncover and preserve an ancient cultural treasure. But when a sandstone arch in the park collapses and takes a woman on top of it to her death, Chuck and his wife Janelle try to untangle the web of environmental and political intrigue surrounding the murder, only to become targets of the killer themselves. “If you want the full impact of the character arcs in this series, start with book one, “Canyon Sacrifice” (set in Grand Canyon National Park), and read your way through the series to Graham’s latest release. Enjoy!” You Can Find It: At BookBar, The Tattered Cover and Amazon. Pat Stoltey Pat Stoltey is the author of “Wishing Caswell Dead,” a 2018 Colorado Book Awards finalist for General Fiction. Pat’s Pick: “The Healer’s Daughter” by Charlotte Hinger. Why You Might Like It: “I just finished reading this excellent 2019 release from Five Star’s Frontier Fiction line. I can’t say enough good things about the story, the characters, and the research that went into this well-written, poignant novel. “Nicodemus is the Kansas town where post-Civil War freed slaves as well as free African Americans were lured from eastern states, primarily southern states, for political purposes. One of the first residents is Bethany Herbert, who acts as a healer and midwife and as the schoolteacher. She tries to hold the community together and overcome the manipulation of the conniving politicians who simply want to buy the votes of Nicodemus’ residents. It’s a hard life, especially when the Nicodemus residents find they are still victims of prejudice and mistreatment in this new environment. “Hinger, a former Kansan (now a resident of northern Colorado) and a historian, has been recognized for her mysteries, but is clearly just as talented in historical fiction. Her language is true to the times and the story spellbinding. Highly recommended.” You Can Find It: At BookBar, The Tattered Cover and Amazon. Michael F. Haspil Michael F. Haspil is the author of “Graveyard Shift,” a 2018 Colorado Book Awards finalist for Science Fiction/Fantasy. Michael’s Pick: “Lump” by Claire L. Fishback. Why You Might Like It: “Colorado summer is right around the corner — though, in some parts of the state, you might not know it. If you like getting goosebumps, the feeling of having your hair stand on end, and the unease of glimpsing something-that-should-not-be out of the corner of your eye, then I have the perfect summer read for you. This collection of short stories by Claire L. Fishback, an up and coming Colorado author, delivers bite-sized chunks of horror. “Claire has thrown together a brilliant collection of horror tales ranging from snacky vignettes to more meaty shorts. They are the perfect stories to gobble up while enjoying a Colorado micro-brew on a warm summer’s eve. Or you may want to binge a bunch of the stories at a time, which is what I did. They are creepy, unsettling, and fun (horror fans know what I mean). And you may find that “Lump” will whet your appetite for heartier fare. Claire Fishback’s debut novel, “The Blood of Seven,” a tight horror-mystery filled with cults, secret societies, and forbidden knowledge, releases on June 21st.” You Can Find It: At BookBar, The Tattered Cover and Amazon. L.D. Colter L.D. “Liz” Colter is the author of “A Borrowed Hell,” the 2018 Colorado Book Awards winner for Science Fiction/Fantasy, and “While Gods Sleep,” the 2019 winner in that category. Liz’s Pick: “The Dresden Files” by Jim Butcher. Why You Might Like It:  There are so many fine authors in Colorado (maybe the mountain air inspires creativity), that even dialing the category down to fantasy and science fiction writers — the genre in which I write — it’s tough to narrow the list to one recommendation. A few of the many regional speculative fiction authors who enjoy widespread appeal are Paolo Bacigalupi, Jim Butcher, Carrie Vaughn, Connie Willis, Kevin J. Anderson, and Carol Burg. There are others, of course, but of the writers whose work I’m most familiar with, I think Paolo Bacigalupi’s speaks to me the most compellingly, with his strong writing and ecologically devastated dystopias. The brutal topics are uncomfortable, though, as they’re meant to be, and may not be for everyone. The author on this list whose writing I’ve read the most is Jim Butcher. I’m part-way through his Dresden Files series, which is well-written urban fantasy combined with mystery and action. Harry Dresden, a wizard who works as a private investigator and helps the Chicago police with supernatural cases, is witty, likable, unlucky, and insightful. Best of all, the character and the series continue to deepen and gain complexity over the fifteen books out so far (with about another five planned, last I heard). An added bonus for audiobook readers is that James Marsters narrates the series brilliantly. “Storm Front” (The Dresden Files, Book 1) begins the series. You Can Find It: At BookBar, The Tattered Cover and Amazon. Jonathan P. Thompson Jonathan P. Thompson is the author of “River of Lost Souls: The Science, Politics, and Greed behind the Gold King Mine Disaster,” a 2019 Colorado Book Awards finalist for Creative Nonfiction. Jonathan’s Pick: “The Water Knife.” by Paolo Bacigalupi. Why You Might Like It: “Bacigalupi’s dystopian novel portrays a not-so-distant future in which global heating has nearly dried up the Colorado River laying waste to many of the cities that rely on it. It’s a perfect summer read, particularly for Coloradans and anyone else in the West, because it’s a thrilling, can’t-put-it-down, page-turner that can hold one’s attention even amid all the other distractions that the season throws at us. More than that, though, it’s a chilling reminder of how our society’s gluttonous ways are putting the planet and all its people into peril.” How to Find It: At BookBar, The Tattered Cover and Amazon. Josh Krule, right, and Jack, both of Denver, read in Cheesman Park after a trip to Tattered Cover on May 26, 2019. Jack is reading Leonard Davis’ “Moon Rush” and Josh is reading “Sirens of Titan” by Kurt Vonnegut. (Eric Lubbers, The Colorado Sun) This reporting is made possible by our members. You can directly support independent watchdog journalism in Colorado for as little as $5 a month. Start here: coloradosun.com/join More from The Colorado Sun A cybersecurity worker shortage in Colorado has the industry tapping veterans to fill the gap Here are eight great books by Colorado authors for your summer reading list Message scent: Douglas fir beetles detoured from Ouray forest by pheromone packets Garage sales and GoFundMe campaigns are nice, but Colorado districts want a better fix for school lunch debt Opinion: Let’s find ways to protect students without placing them at additional risk
27 May 19
Radio Free

In “Manufacturing Consent: The Political Economy of the Mass Media,” published in 1988, Edward S. Herman and Noam Chomsky exposed the techniques that the commercial media used to promote and defend the economic, social and political agendas of the ruling elites. These techniques included portraying victims as either worthy or unworthy of sympathy. A Catholic […]

27 May 19
Cross's Writing Corner

So I’ve decided to buy a expensive (when compared to the economic crisis my country is going through right now) microphone and to start recording my constant bullshit-ery from my small little home in Belgrade. It’s for comedic purposes, so give it a listen, stick around if you want, and have a good day. Yours […]

27 May 19
The Reading Fangirl

Genre: YA Contemporary Pages: 400 Publisher: Scholastic Source: Publisher Format: Finished copy Rating: 4 stars Goodreads Buy the Book: Waterstones, Amazon, The Book Depository Blurb: In the town of Newsands, painfully shy Alex is abandoned by his two best friends for the summer. But he unexpectedly lands a part-time job at Wonderland, a run-down amusement arcade on the seafront, where he […]

27 May 19
Dalanel

Well who do you look up to? Parents, friends, celebrities? In a world filled with liars and scandals it’s nice to be able to look up to someone. That someone is someone you would model yourself after, thus the name “role model”. So what is this post about? Well, I’m going to tell you who […]

27 May 19
WPMT FOX43

PACIFIC, Mo. – There was pomp and circumstance. There were caps and gowns. Proud family members sat in the audience. It looked like just another graduation ceremony — except it took place at the Missouri Eastern Correctional Center in the town of Pacific, where all 10 of the graduates are incarcerated. The graduates received Associate […]

27 May 19
The Original Misfit

PART I People tend to misunderstand possession. Decades of Hollywood misrepresentation, bad internet research, separation from old traditions, and culture of silent suffering keep these things out of the public consciousness. It makes us vulnerable. When it began happening to me, I had no idea what I was dealing with. That ignorance let it fester […]