Baffin

16 Feb 19
Selene

Baffin Women’s Taupe Chloe Boots ( Womens SIze 9 ) 4510-0185-BG4-09 – Buy – Baffin Women’s Taupe Chloe Boots ( Womens SIze 9 ) 4510-0185-BG4-09

15 Feb 19
Arctos Guides

  I grew up in New Hampshire and have been skiing since I was two years old. The call of the wild and the pursuit of deep powder snow brought me to British Columbia.  I rolled out here in a camperized and vegetable oil powered 1982 240D Mercedes Benz to fulfill my powder dreams.  Needless […]

15 Feb 19
Writings according to Tommy

My designs. My enjoyment. My place.

14 Feb 19
WWD

The parka-maker drove sales higher by more than 50 percent while temperatures fell.

14 Feb 19
Men's Journal
Far-north adventures, like heli-skiing on Baffin Island and dog-sledding in Greenland, require vastly different cold weather gear and apparel than, say, resort skiing in Colorado. Our writer recently partook in the first commercial ski-tour of Siberia’s Altai Mountains, from the northern China side, where sub-zero temperatures are the rule. Here’s what worked. [ami-related id=”- Click to search articles -” url=”https://www.mensjournal.com/travel/win-at-winter-6-adventures-to-make-the-most-of-the-cold-w455175/” title=”Win at Winter: 6 Adventures to Make the Most of the Cold” target=”_blank” thumb=”true” imgsrc=”https://www.mensjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/m0117_nb_winter_a-8f562a98-5fdd-494c-8882-cdcd5f8bb62b.jpg?crop=1px%2C1882px%2C2874px%2C1609px&resize=200%2C113″ inset=”true” format=”gallery” subtitle=””]
14 Feb 19
AlphaStreet

Canada Goose Holdings Inc. (GOOS) reported a 64% jump in earnings for the third quarter helped by higher order values, shipment timing, favorable forex, incremental revenue, and strong retail stores performance. The results exceeded analysts’ expectations. The premium outdoor apparel maker lifted its guidance for fiscal 2019. Net income climbed 64.1% to C$103.4 million and […]

14 Feb 19
Financial Post

TORONTO — Canada Goose Holdings Inc. (“Canada Goose” or the “Company”) (NYSE:GOOS, TSX:GOOS) today announced financial results for the third quarter ended December 31, 2018. The Company’s Management’s Discussion and Analysis and Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Interim Financial Statements for the three and nine months ended December 31, 2018 will be filed on SEDAR at http://www.sedar.com, […]

14 Feb 19
Ryan's JRN 102 Blog

The year is 986 CE, which is just about 500 years before Christopher Columbus set foot in the Bahamas. It is here where Norse-Icelandic explorer, Bjarni Herjólfsson, made history… almost. Herjólfsson and his crew found themselves lost at sea on their journey towards Greenland, as fierce storms and sudden squalls threw them off course. Mind […]

14 Feb 19
Ted Campbell's Point of View

Despite being almost overwhelmed with news and opinion about the trials and tribulations of Prime Minister Trudeau, and his government, on the one hand, and the estimable Ms Jody Wilson-Raybould, on the other, I also noted some news on the strategic and military fronts provoked by some comments made at a conference here in Ottawa […]

13 Feb 19
TNT

Ice volume calculated anew Climate change is causing glaciers to shrink around the world. Reduced meltwaters from these glaciers also have downstream effects, particularly on freshwater availability. A lack of meltwater can greatly restrict the water supply to many rivers, especially in arid regions such as the Andes or central Asia, that depend on this […]

13 Feb 19
TNT

Ice volume calculated anew Climate change is causing glaciers to shrink around the world. Reduced meltwaters from these glaciers also have downstream effects, particularly on freshwater availability. A lack of meltwater can greatly restrict the water supply to many rivers, especially in arid regions such as the Andes or central Asia, that depend on this […]

13 Feb 19
Snapshot from Somewhere

Gagganau speaks to Francoise Gervais, an expedition leader and dive-master, pushing the boundaries for travellers venturing to the Canadian Arctic

12 Feb 19
Drive to RV

It sounds like winter RVing can be tons of fun with some planning and preparation. It’s also apparent that staying warm in your rig on chilly winter mornings and cold evenings makes all the difference between having a wonderful time and wishing you were in a sticks-n-bricks.

12 Feb 19
News Archives Uk

About 115,000 years ago, when humans first arrived, the earth experienced a warm period. The place of early Homo sapiens was limited at that time, as the sea level was six to nine meters higher. The climate was much the same today as it is today, but scientists have found that our sea level is […]

12 Feb 19
The Irish Sun
EARTH’S sea levels should be 30 feet higher than they are – and dramatic melting in Antarctica may soon plug the gap, scientists warn. They say that global temperatures today are the same as they were 115,000 years ago, a time when modern humans were only just beginning to leave Africa. This graph shows what parts of the UK and Europe are at risk from a seal level rise of 5 metres (16ft) Research shows that during this time period, known as the Eemian, scorching ocean temperatures caused a catastrophic global ice melt. As a result, sea levels were 20-30ft higher than they are today. But if modern ocean temperatures are the same as they were during the Eemian, that means our planet is “missing” a devastating sea rise. If oceans were to rise by just six feet, large swathes of coastal cities would find themselves underwater, turning streets into canals and completely submerging some buildings. Recent research uncovered preserved moss in the Arctic Circle. It had remained frozen in ice for 115,000 years until that ice retreated last month Large parts of London and Kent would be submerged, while Portsmouth, Cambridge and Peterborough wouldn’t fair much better. Scientists think that sea levels made this jump 115,000 years ago because of a sudden ice collapse in Antarctica. The continent’s vulnerable West Antarctic ice sheet – which is already retreating again today – released a lot of sea level rise in a hurry. “There’s no way to get tens of meters of sea level rise without getting tens of meters of sea level rise from Antarctica,” said Dr Rob DeConto, an Antarctic expert at the University of Massachusetts. [boxout headline=”Rising sea levels – what’s the problem?” intro=”Here’s what you need to know…”] The global sea level has been gradually rising over the past century Sea levels rise due to two main reasons The first is thermal expansion – as water gets warmer, it expands The second is melting ice on land, adding fresh water into seas This has a cyclical effect, because melting ice also warms up the planet (and oceans), causing more even ice to melt and boosting thermal expansion It’s currently rising at a rate of around 0.3cm per year The sea is huge, so that might sound harmless But rising sea levels can have a devastating effect over time Low-lying coastal areas can disappear completely, even putting areas of the UK at risk It can also mean sea storms and tsunamis can have a more devastating effect, reaching further in-land than they would have previously There’s also an increased risk of flooding [/boxout] His team created state of the art computer models that showed how Antarctic ice responded to warm ocean temperatures during the Eemian. They showed that two processes, called marine ice cliff collapse and marine ice sheet instability, rapidly melted the West Antarctic ice sheet.   They exposed thick glaciers that formed part of the ice sheet to the ocean, meaning the ice blocks floated out to sea more quickly. Here they quickly melted, adding thousands of tonnes of water to the world’s oceans. Dubbed the ‘world’s most dangerous glacier’, the Thwaites glacier in Antarctica is under threat from rising temperatures   Scientists warn that if ice shelves in Antarctica undergo similar processes, it could spell disaster for Earth. Combined with melting in Greenland, we could see sea levels rise much as six feet in total this century. In the next century, ice loss would get even worse. “What we pointed out was, if the kind of calving that we see in Greenland today were to start turning on in analogous settings in Antarctica, then Antarctica has way thicker ice, it’s a way bigger ice sheet, the consequences would be potentially really monumental for sea level rise,” Dr DeConto said. Baffin Island (pictured) is part of Canada, and much of it sits in the Arctic Circle. Much of its ice is retreating due to rising temperatures [article-rail-section title=”TOP STORIES IN SCIENCE” posts_category=”5603″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] Last month, Nasa warned that Antarctica’s Thwaites glacier could collapse within decades and “sink cities” after its discovered a 1,000-foot doomsday cavity lurking below the ice block. If sea levels rise by just six feet, then parts of Europe could “disappear”, according to some scientists. And check out this sea level “doomsday” simulator if you’d like to know whether your home would be wiped out by rising oceans. Are you worried about climate change? Let us know in the comments! We pay for your stories! Do you have a story for The Sun Online news team? Email us at tips@the-sun.co.uk or call 0207 782 4368 . We pay for videos too. Click here to upload yours.