Bafta Fellowship

22 May 19
GoldDerby
Laurence Olivier would’ve celebrated his 112th birthday on May 22, 2019. The Oscar-winning thespian is best remembered for his psychologically intense Shakespeare adaptations, both as an actor and a director. Yet his filmography extends well past the Bard’s work. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best. Born in 1907 in Surrey, England, Olivier first came to prominence on the British stage. A series of acclaimed theatrical performances, most notably in Noel Coward‘s “Private Lives,” caught the attention of filmmakers both in the UK and the US. [pmc-related-link href=”https://www.goldderby.com/gallery/alfred-hitchcock-movies-25-greatest-films-ranked-from-worst-to-best/” type=”SEE” target=”_blank”]Alfred Hitchcock movies: 25 greatest films ranked from worst to best[/pmc-related-link] He earned his first Oscar nomination as Best Actor for William Wyler‘s “Wuthering Heights” (1939), competing the very next year for Alfred Hitchcock‘s “Rebecca” (1940). Having firmly established himself as a formidable talent in front of the camera, he stepped behind it to great success with “Henry V” (1944, released in the US in 1946), the first of three films he would direct and star in based on the works of William Shakespeare. The Academy rewarded him with an Honorary Oscar for his achievement, and he contended once again in Best Actor. Olivier hit the Oscar jackpot with his second Shakespeare adaptation, “Hamlet” (1948), which became the first British film to win Best Picture. He took home the Best Actor prize for his moody performance as the gloomy Prince of Denmark, and competed in Best Director. [pmc-related-link href=”https://www.goldderby.com/gallery/oscar-best-actor-gallery-every-winner-academy-award-history/” type=”SEE” target=”_blank”]Oscar Best Actor Gallery: Every Winner in Academy Award History[/pmc-related-link] Olivier would return to the Oscar race six more times: five in lead (“Richard III” in 1956, “The Entertainer” in 1960, “Othello” in 1965, “Sleuth” in 1972, and “The Boys from Brazil” in 1978), once in supporting (“Marathon Man” in 1976). He was given a second Honorary award for his career in 1979. On the TV side, Olivier won Emmys for his performances in “The Moon and Sixpence” (1959), “Long Day’s Journey Into Night” (1973), “Love Among the Ruins” (1975), “Brideshead Revisited” (1981), and “King Lear” (1983). He earned a Tony nomination for the original stage production of “The Entertainer” in 1958. Olivier won BAFTAs for his performances in “Richard III” and “Oh! What a Lovely War” (1969) and received their Academy Fellowship in 1976. He won Golden Globes for “Hamlet” and “Marathon Man,” as well as the Cecil B. DeMille award in 1983. Tour our photo gallery of Olivier’s 15 greatest films, including some of the titles listed above, as well as “49th Parallel” (1941), “That Hamilton Woman” (1941), “Spartacus” (1960) and more. PREDICT the Emmys now; change them until July 16 Be sure to make your Emmy predictions today so that Hollywood insiders can see how their TV shows and performers are faring in our odds. You can keep changing your predictions as often as you like until just before nominations are announced on July 16. And join in the fun debate over the 2019 Emmy taking place right now with Hollywood insiders in our television forums. Read more Gold Derby entertainment news. SIGN UP for Gold Derby’s free newsletter with latest predictions
22 May 19
GoldDerby
Laurence Olivier would’ve celebrated his 112th birthday on May 22, 2019. The Oscar-winning thespian is best remembered for his psychologically intense Shakespeare adaptations, both as an actor and a director. Yet his filmography extends well past the Bard’s work. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best. Born in 1907 in Surrey, England, Olivier first came to prominence on the British stage. A series of acclaimed theatrical performances, most notably in Noel Coward‘s “Private Lives,” caught the attention of filmmakers both in the UK and the US. He earned his first Oscar nomination as Best Actor for William Wyler‘s “Wuthering Heights” (1939), competing the very next year for Alfred Hitchcock‘s “Rebecca” (1940). Having firmly established himself as a formidable talent in front of the camera, he stepped behind it to great success with “Henry V” (1944, released in the US in 1946), the first of three films he would direct and star in based on the works of William Shakespeare. The Academy rewarded him with an Honorary Oscar for his achievement, and he contended once again in Best Actor. Olivier hit the Oscar jackpot with his second Shakespeare adaptation, “Hamlet” (1948), which became the first British film to win Best Picture. He took home the Best Actor prize for his moody performance as the gloomy Prince of Denmark, and competed in Best Director. Olivier would return to the Oscar race six more times: five in lead (“Richard III” in 1956, “The Entertainer” in 1960, “Othello” in 1965, “Sleuth” in 1972, and “The Boys from Brazil” in 1978), once in supporting (“Marathon Man” in 1976). He was given a second Honorary award for his career in 1979. On the TV side, Olivier won Emmys for his performances in “The Moon and Sixpence” (1959), “Long Day’s Journey Into Night” (1973), “Love Among the Ruins” (1975), “Brideshead Revisited” (1981), and “King Lear” (1983). He earned a Tony nomination for the original stage production of “The Entertainer” in 1958. Olivier won BAFTAs for his performances in “Richard III” and “Oh! What a Lovely War” (1969) and received their Academy Fellowship in 1976. He won Golden Globes for “Hamlet” and “Marathon Man,” as well as the Cecil B. DeMille award in 1983. Tour our photo gallery of Olivier’s 15 greatest films, including some of the titles listed above, as well as “49th Parallel” (1941), “That Hamilton Woman” (1941), “Spartacus” (1960), and more.
15 May 19
From page to stage - and everything in between

Artistic Directors of Paines Plough James Grieve and George Perrin today announced casting, creative team and tour for their final Roundabout season. Paines Plough’s award-winning portable in-the-round auditorium, Roundabout was conceived by Grieve and Perrin and launched in 2014. Roundabout will showcase three world premieres, On the Other Hand, We’re Happy by Daf James, Dexter […]

15 May 19
Paines Plough's Blog

We are delighted to announce the cast and creative team for ROUNDABOUT 2019. Once again we are thrilled to be co-producing three brand new plays with our pals at Theatr Clwyd to premiere in beautiful North Wales before setting off on tour around the UK. And we’re thrilled to introduce the band… James and George […]

14 May 19
First Baptist Church of Hudson, NH

  BAFTA JUNE PROGRAM ALL WELCOME The June BAFTA (Be A Friend To All) will be held at the church on June 4, 2018.  There will be a dinner followed by a special speaker, David Wiernicki of Stonecroft Ministries. Dinner will be served at 6:00pm with the speaker for the evening at 7:00pm.  There is […]

14 May 19
Urban Asian

British Academy Televison Awards also known as BAFTA awards was held on 12th May 2019 at the Royal Festival Hall in London. BAFTA 2019 showcases some of the best in TV from the past year, and with shows like Killing Eve, Bodyguard and Derry Girls, 2019’s ceremony isn’t one to miss.   Have a look […]

13 May 19
BOSS AGENCIES

It’s that time of year again, the BAFTA Awards were back for another year and we had some strong talent and contenders for 2019. No surprise, Killing Eve took the lead from being awarded Best Drama Series, following Jodie Comer winning leading actress to Fiona Shaw as supporting actress. Amongst the wonderful nominees was Coronation […]

13 May 19
IndieWire
Phoebe Waller Bridge’s slinky thriller “Killing Eve” made its mark at the BAFTA TV Awards on May 12, taking home three prizes, including drama series, lead actress for Jodie Comer and supporting actress for Fiona Shaw.  Now airing its second season on BBC America, the series centers around a bored spy played by Sandra Oh who gets drawn into a game of cat-and-mouse with Comer’s obsessive contract killer.  The win is a significant boost for Comer, whose performance in Season 1 was often overshadowed by Oh’s, resulting in both a Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild Award for the latter.  HBO’s “Succession” also got a boost in its Emmy campaign, taking home the BAFTA for international series, edging out last year’s winner, Hulu’s “The Handmaid’s Tale.” There were several other familiar faces for American audiences amongst the winners at the BAFTAs, including love for the Sky Atlantic/Showtime miniseries “Patrick Melrose,” which scored honors for both miniseries and lead actor for star Benedict Cumberbatch.  Meanwhile, Ben Whishaw won the BAFTA for supporting actor in a drama series for his work on the BBC drama “A Very English Scandal.” Sunday night’s event was the second of two BAFTA TV Awards ceremonies. While this event celebrated above-the-line talent, an April 29 event focused on honoring craftspeople working behind the scenes. The full list of BAFTA TV winners is below. BAFTA TV Awards Drama series: “Killing Eve” International: “Succession” Miniseries: “A Very English Scandal” Leading actress: Jodie Comer, “Killing Eve” Leading actor: Benedict Cumberbatch, “Patrick Melrose” Supporting actress: Fiona Shaw, “Killing Eve” Supporting actor: Ben Whishaw, “A Very English Scandal” Scripted comedy: “Sally4Ever” Female performance in a comedy program: Jessica Hynes, “There She Goes” Male performance in a comedy program: Steve Pemberton, “Inside No. 9” Single drama: “Killed By My Debt” Single documentary: “Gun No. 6” Comedy entertainment program: “A League Of Their Own” Entertainment performance: Lee Mack, “Would I Lie To You?” Entertainment program: “Britain’s Got Talent” Specialist factual: “Suffragettes With Lucy Worsley” Reality & constructed factual: “I’m a Celebrity… Get Me Out of Here” Factual series: “Louis Theroux’s Altered States” Features: “Who Do You Think You Are?” Current affairs: “Myanmar’s Killing Fields (Dispatches)” Live event: “The Royal British Legion Festival of Remembrance” News coverage: “Cambridge Analytica Uncovered” Short form program: “Missed Call” Soap & continuing drama: “Eastenders” Sport: “2018 World Cup Quarter Final: England v Sweden” Virgin TV’s must-see moment (voted for by the public): “Bodyguard” BAFTA Fellowship (previously announced): Joan Bakewell Special award (previously announced): Nicola Shindler
13 May 19
The Cinemaholic

‘Killing Eve‘ and ‘Patrick Melrose‘ emerged as the big winners at the BAFTA TV Awards 2019. The ceremony took place at the Royal Festival Hall in London on Sunday. ‘Killing’ Eve,’ which is a BBC America drama, took home three top prizes including the best drama series, the best actress for Jodie Comer and the best-supporting […]

12 May 19
Helena Shackleton Journalism

Hundreds of Britain’s best loved television stars flocked to the prestigious BAFTA TV Awards on Sunday night, which were held at the Royal Festival Hall in London. The Evening was shown live on BBC1 and was hosted by well-loved Chat Show host Graham Norton, with awards presented by many other familiar faces, such as Danny […]

12 May 19
Canoe

Hit dramas Killing Eve and Patrick Melrose were the toast of the British Academy Television Awards on Sunday night. #BAFTATV backstage winners' interview… Drama Series, the chuffed team behind @KillingEve 📺👏 pic.twitter.com/yve9Sh1f0z — BAFTA (@BAFTA) May 12, 2019 YAYYYYYYYY pic.twitter.com/suFLrNzrr3 — Oh 👑 (@iamstanoh) May 12, 2019 Sandra Oh’s series was the night’s big winner […]

12 May 19
News Archives Uk

Again it is this time of the year. The 2019 British Academy Television Awards gather the best TV talents at London's Royal Festival Hall, where the best actors and creators in the industry hope to get their hands on the coveted Bafta statues. BAFTA TV Awards 2019: COMPLETE list of winners – as announced Who […]

12 May 19
TV And Comics

Si è tenuta alla Royal Festival Hall di Londra l’edizione di quest’anno dei BAFTA TV Awards presentata da Graham Norton. Ecco i vincitori.