Battle

16 Feb 19
Thai Footie

The 2019 Thai League (T2) season kicks off on February 22ndwhen Ratchaburi host newly-promoted Trat FC. With the league having been reduced to 16 teams from 18, we will not see quite the same scramble to survive as last year when five teams were relegated. However, with three teams going down, there will still be […]

16 Feb 19
Variety

Warner Bros. has scheduled Legendary’s science-fiction tentpole “Dune” for a Nov. 20, 2020, release in 3D and Imax. “Aquaman” star Jason Momoa is in negotiations to join the “Dune” reboot with Timothee Chalamet, Javier Bardem, Rebecca Ferguson, Stellan Skarsgard, Dave Bautista, Josh Brolin, Oscar Isaac, and Zendaya. Production is expected to launch in the spring […]

16 Feb 19
SCNG
Teary tributes and stirring song rang through the cavernous hall of Trinity Baptist Church Friday morning as loved ones and colleagues reflected on Michelle King’s life as a compassionate leader devoted to public education in Los Angeles. King, who worked from student aide to superintendent of the nation’s second largest district, died on Feb. 2 at age 57 following a years-long battle with cancer. Hundreds attended the memorial service, which was also live-streamed on the district’s website. It was immediately followed by King’s funeral at Inglewood Park Cemetery. “With poise and grace you never gave up,” said King’s close friend Kim Seabrooks of King in her work and in fighting illness. “That love you had for students … I’m so proud of all the ways you advocated for my own children.” #gallery-1627878-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1627878-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1627878-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1627878-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Michelle King, LAUSD’s first female chief and African American superintendent, is memorialized in a public ceremony at Trinity Baptist Church in Los Angeles on Friday, February 15, 2019. (Photo by Axel Koester, Contributing Photographer) Brittany King returns to her pew after singing during the funeral of her mom, Michelle King, LAUSDÕs first female chief and African American superintendent, at Trinity Baptist Church in Los Angeles on Friday, February 15, 2019. (Photo by Axel Koester, Contributing Photographer) Senator Diane Watson speaks during the funeral of Michelle King, LAUSDÕs first female chief and African American superintendent, at Trinity Baptist Church in Los Angeles on Friday, February 15, 2019. (Photo by Axel Koester, Contributing Photographer) Kim Seabrooks shares memories of her long-time friend during the funeral of Michelle King, LAUSDÕs first female chief and African American superintendent, at Trinity Baptist Church in Los Angeles on Friday, February 15, 2019. (Photo by Axel Koester, Contributing Photographer) Ashley King reads from the Bible during the funeral of her mom, Michelle King, LAUSD’s first female chief and African American superintendent, at Trinity Baptist Church in Los Angeles on Friday, February 15, 2019. (Photo by Axel Koester, Contributing Photographer) Michelle King, LAUSD’s first female chief and African American superintendent, is memorialized in a public ceremony at Trinity Baptist Church in Los Angeles on Friday, February 15, 2019. (Photo by Axel Koester, Contributing Photographer) Kim Seabrooks shares memories of her long-time friend during the funeral of Michelle King, LAUSDÕs first female chief and African American superintendent, at Trinity Baptist Church in Los Angeles on Friday, February 15, 2019. (Photo by Axel Koester, Contributing Photographer) The Los Angeles School Police Honor Guard pays their respects during the funeral of Michelle King, LAUSDÕs first female chief and African American superintendent, at Trinity Baptist Church in Los Angeles on Friday, February 15, 2019. (Photo by Axel Koester, Contributing Photographer) The Los Angeles School Police Honor Guard pays their respects during the funeral of Michelle King, LAUSD’s first female chief and African American superintendent, at Trinity Baptist Church in Los Angeles on Friday, February 15, 2019. (Photo by Axel Koester, Contributing Photographer) The Los Angeles School Police Honor Guard pays their respects during the funeral of Michelle King, LAUSDÕs first female chief and African American superintendent, at Trinity Baptist Church in Los Angeles on Friday, February 15, 2019. (Photo by Axel Koester, Contributing Photographer) The Los Angeles School Police Honor Guard pays their respects during the funeral of Michelle King, LAUSDÕs first female chief and African American superintendent, at Trinity Baptist Church in Los Angeles on Friday, February 15, 2019. (Photo by Axel Koester, Contributing Photographer) Michelle King, LAUSD’s first female chief and African American superintendent, is memorialized in a public ceremony at Trinity Baptist Church in Los Angeles on Friday, February 15, 2019. (Photo by Axel Koester, Contributing Photographer) Michelle King, LAUSDÕs first female chief and African American superintendent, is memorialized in a public ceremony at Trinity Baptist Church in Los Angeles on Friday, February 15, 2019. (Photo by Axel Koester, Contributing Photographer) Kim Seabrooks shares memories of her long-time friend during the funeral of Michelle King, LAUSDÕs first female chief and African American superintendent, at Trinity Baptist Church in Los Angeles on Friday, February 15, 2019. (Photo by Axel Koester, Contributing Photographer) Kim Seabrooks shares memories of her long-time friend during the funeral of Michelle King, LAUSD’s first female chief and African American superintendent, at Trinity Baptist Church in Los Angeles on Friday, February 15, 2019. (Photo by Axel Koester, Contributing Photographer)   L.A. Unified School District student musicians from Cortines High School and Mark Twain Middle performed songs punctuated by bible verses, stories and poems by King’s three surviving daughters. They wore purple, their mother’s favorite color. A video montage produced by the family revealed an ambitious, fun-loving woman with a winning smile. Public officials like California senator Diane Watson also memorialized King. Watson, who had long known the King family, applauded her accomplishments as the first black woman to lead LAUSD. In her truncated time at the district’s helm, King raised the graduation rate by allowing students to make up failed classes. She also sought to grow special programs that would offset declining enrollment spurred by charter school growth. “Michelle King championed unifying and collaborating, and as a collaborative leader she broke down barriers … and I can tell you, she’s sitting at the feet of God now saying ‘fix this situation, fix it.” Brent Robinson, a local representative of U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris, D-CA, read a condolence letter written by the 2020 presidential contender. “My heart goes out to you and your family,” Harris wrote in a letter addressed to King’s daughters Ashly, Brittney and Colleen. “Her passion for education and commitment to equal opportunity will have a lasting impact on a generation of students whose lives were made better by your mother’s warmth, love and generosity.” [cq comment=”The following content will display as an info box.”] Related links Former LA Unified Superintendent Michelle King dies at age 57 Former LA Unified Superintendent Michelle King dies at age 57 L.A. school district selects Michele King as next superintendent [cq comment=”This is the end of the info box.”] LAUSD board member George McKenna gave an emotional tribute to King focused on her intelligence and devotion to their work as top administrators. He described a warm working relationship with her as superintendent. “She had the optimism of a cheerleader and the seriousness of a scientist,” McKenna said of the UCLA biology major. “She never failed at anything, and she had courage in the face of adversity, even when her greatest fight came … I’d give anything for one more meeting with my superintendent.” Susan Allen, retired LAUSD high school director and interim superintendent of the district’s Westside, worked closely with King. “Of course, I’m empathetic to her family but it’s just such a loss for the district,” she lamented. “She really believed you could make better decisions when you bring people together … and it was effective. Other people sometimes come with an agenda. Her agenda was just to help more kids.” Then Los Angeles Unified School District Superintendent Michelle King is shown in a file photo. (July 5, 2017 photo by Ed Crisostomo, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)
16 Feb 19
Irish Confederates

Few movies and television programs get the veteran thing right, in my opinion. One program that does is the Netflix program, Peaky Blinders. If you spend anytime watching Peaky Blinders, you will see many references to the war service of the two main protagonists, Thomas and Arthur Shelby. The two brothers served in World War […]

16 Feb 19
Assibi's Storytelling

By: Assibi Ali Mental health stigmas in American culture are damaging our children and exposing them to the risk of potentially disrupting their transition into adulthood. The last couple of years in America has seen both local and national mental health awareness initiatives launch by the dozen. Celebrities like Christopher Wood, Shawn Mendes, Selena Gomez, […]

16 Feb 19
Us Weekly
Taking him down a peg! Chrissy Teigen joked about cheating on her husband, John Legend, after the “All of Me” singer boasted about how much their son, Miles, 8 months, looked like him. [ami-related id=”- Click to search articles -” url=”https://www.usmagazine.com/celebrity-news/pictures/every-time-chrissy-teigen-has-trolled-john-legend/” title=”Every Time Chrissy Teigen Has Trolled John Legend’s Feed” target=”” inset=”true”] The comment came after the Cravings: Hungry for More author, 33, shared a photo of her toddler on Instagram on Friday, February 15. View this post on Instagram someone had a wonderful valentine’s dinner with @alanavanderaa and @chrishimmm! maybe he will fit into these shoes by next v-day A post shared by chrissy teigen (@chrissyteigen) on Feb 15, 2019 at 8:32am PST “Someone had a wonderful valentine’s dinner with @alanavanderaa and @chrishimmm! maybe he will fit into these shoes by next v-day,” she captioned the adorable shot. The 10-time Grammy winner was quick to respond, writing, “He is me!” The Lip Sync Battle cohost couldn’t resist teasing her spouse, responding, “@johnlegend it’s important to cheat with people who look like your husband.” Other stars were also quick to chime in, with Katharine McPhee writing, “Honey I Shrunk John Legend — coming to theaters this spring” and Halle Berry adding, “WOW I approve of this content.” [ami-related id=”- Click to search articles -” url=”https://www.usmagazine.com/entertainment/pictures/funniest-female-stars-in-hollywood-2012129/” title=”Funniest Female Stars in Hollywood” target=”” inset=”true”] Teigen regularly trolls Legend on social media: In June, she shared a photo on Instagram of the pair’s daughter, Luna, 2, holding an Arthur doll after a meme went viral comparing the musician to the popular Canadian children’s book character. “Luna and daddy,” she wrote on the post. The Twitter star also took a jab at the Emmy winner on their fifth wedding anniversary after he announced that he would be joining the cast of The Voice on the same day that her Cravings by Chrissy Teigen cookware line debuted at Target. [ami-related id=”- Click to search articles -” url=”https://www.usmagazine.com/celebrity-news/pictures/chrissy-teigen-john-legend-through-the-years-2015119/” title=”Chrissy Teigen and John Legend’s Epic Romance” target=”” inset=”true”] “12 years ago today, I met the man of my dreams,” Teigen captioned a picture via Twitter from their wedding. “And 5 years ago today, we got married. We have two babies and some pups and a life I am grateful to have. My everything, I love you and am so proud of the story we’ve created. But you are an a–hole for releasing your @nbcthevoice news on my target launch day for real.” The model and the record producer got hitched in September 2013.
16 Feb 19
Press Telegram
Dave and Melanie Werts on New Year’s Eve 2018 at a restaurant party with longtime friends, Rich and Pat Archbold, and other friends. He died on Valentine’s Day, 2019. (Photo by Pat Archbold) This is one column I had hoped I wouldn’t be writing anytime soon. It is about a dear friend and neighbor, Dave Werts, who passed away on Valentine’s Day after a grueling battle with prostate cancer that had spread into his bone marrow. The last time my wife and I saw Dave he was wearing a silly hat on New Year’s Eve. Our get together was an annual ritual of many years with other longtime friends to welcome in the new year. Stating our resolutions for the new year became a part of that tradition. I wrote them down inside a party hat so they could be reviewed – with a lot of laughter – the next year. At our 2017 party, we were all dismayed when Dave announced that his prostate cancer had come back after five years. But the cancer had gone into remission before and we were hopeful it would again. This time, however, the cancer turned out to be a rarer form and more aggressive. Only 3 percent of prostate cancers were of the kind Dave had. He endured blood transfusions and other medications to try to hold off the disease. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] At our last New Year’s Eve get together, Dave was a little frail, but he was in incredibly good spirits despite the dour medical prognosis. “I feel pretty good, considering everything,” he told us. Ever optimistic, he said his resolutions for the new year included cleaning up the clutter in his home office. He also resolved to finish his memoirs in an autobiography he had been working on for years. After fighting long and hard with his cancer, it was a massive brain hemorrhage that finally defeated Dave in the end, according to his wife of 46 years, Melanie. “We had a lovely evening Wednesday, sharing a nice bottle of wine and ending with our usual good night kiss and I love you,” she said. But Dave had a relapse early the next morning on Valentine’s Day, and he was rushed to the emergency room at Long Beach Memorial Hospital. “He was in a coma, but I was able to hold him to say goodbye,” she said. He died a short time later at age 83. The day after Dave died, my wife, Pat, and I visited with Melanie in their home in El Dorado Park Estates a few blocks from where we live. Every day, I would go by their home on the way to work and tap a silent salute to them on my car horn. Neighbors Our friendship actually began with our wives in 1982 when their oldest son, Tavis, and our oldest daughter, Kelly, were in the same kindergarten class at Newcomb Elementary. Just by luck, Melanie and my wife chose the same day of the week to volunteer in their classroom. Our friendship grew from there. Our second daughter, Katie, and Dave’s second son, Brandon, were both born in 1980 and went to Newcomb together. In those early years Dave’s sons and their friends called Dave “The Wizard” because of his gray beard and mustache and the fact that he had a mysterious job at the aerospace company, TRW. Born in Oskaloosa, Iowa, on Aug. 10, 1935, Dave had aeronautical engineering degrees from Iowa State University and the University of Minnesota. For years, Dave couldn’t talk about anything he did at TRW because his work was classified for defense reasons. Only years later – when the projects were declassified – did Dave reveal that some of his work involved analyzing data from spy satellites, Tavis told us. “He was truly a rocket scientist; he just couldn’t talk about a lot of what he did,” Melanie said. In one of our last visits together, we all joked about how he would be taking those job secrets to the grave. It just happened too soon. Dave was great to be around. He was super smart and could talk about anything. He was even-tempered and was a calming influence no matter how hot discussions would get on certain issues. “He never raised his voice to me or anyone, and I never heard him say anything unkind about anyone,” Melanie said. He loved jazz, Stan Kenton being one of his favorites. He played the trombone in his high school’s marching band and then in the Iowa State Marching Band. The trombone rests silently in his home now. He also was on the board of the Jazz Angels, a nonprofit helping youngsters play and appreciate jazz. He was well-versed on fine wine, especially French reds. He developed a taste for wine while working in Europe for several years. Some of those bottles made their way to our dinner parties. Another passion of his was genealogical research, and he was good at that, too. He produced detailed records in book form on his family as well as Melanie’s. Long before the availability of online records, he worked for more than 15 years poring through microfilm records, such as in the famous Mormon genealogy library in Salt Lake City. I remember his glee at describing how an obscure newspaper clipping from long ago provided additional clues about his German ancestors. He also loved to ski, which he did into his seventies. Both of us shared a love of spy thrillers and would exchange books. He was an excellent photographer. He enjoyed fast cars and went to every Long Beach Grand Prix race, except two. “He also had a handful of cool cars including a 1964 Ferrari Lusso that he had when he met my mom,” Tavis said. “He sold it to buy the house in Long Beach. The car is worth more than the house now.” Someone who spends money on good wine, trips to Europe, cars and skiing trips is not really a tightwad, but Dave did have a thrifty side. He refused to pay for cable TV and, surprisingly, this expert on technology, never owned a cell phone because he didn’t want to be bothered and, besides, it costs money. I often saw him cutting his own grass as I drove by their house. He enjoyed working in his garden but had to give it up as the cancer began to take its toll. The real loves of his life were his wife and sons. He was working on a TRW project with the Federal Reserve Board in Washington, D.C. when he met a young woman, Melanie Retzsch, at a swimming pool in an apartment building where they lived in Arlington, Virginia on Memorial Day, 1972. Talk about a whirlwind romance. After 2 1⁄2 weeks dating, Dave proposed to Melanie. She said yes. I asked her if it was love at first sight. “Pretty close, I’d say,” she replied with a smile. “He was the first man I fell in love with. He told me there might be a problem because he was 36 and I was 23. He said when they got older he might slow down and want to read a book by the fireplace and maybe I wouldn’t want to do that. I told him I’d read a book with him by that fireplace.” They got married on Oct. 1, 1972 in Rochester, New York, her hometown. Dave also was always at Melanie’s side as she plunged into volunteer work with nonprofits. Melanie is a dynamo. She served nine years on the Long Beach Day Nursery Board, ending up there as president. She ran the Assistance League Thrift Shop for two years. She is currently president of the Historical Society of Long Beach. And she is on the board of the Tichenor Clinic. “No matter what I did in the community he was always at my side,” she said. “He was so supportive. He told me I could do anything I put my mind to. He was my champion.” On the night before he died, Dave told Melanie he was afraid he had not taken care of all the things he should before he passed. “He was always thinking of me,” she told me, with tears in her eyes. She said she wrote him a Valentine poem to accompany a bottle of wine every Valentine’s Day. He saved every poem and kept them in a box. She said her poem for him this Valentine’s Day was a note she put on Facebook. It read: “My darling Dave left us today. Dave was a man who truly lived his best life. Ours was a marriage of love, respect, admiration, laughter and easy companionship. I will miss his beautiful smile, his quick wit and his strength. He was my rock and the love of my life so perhaps it is fitting that we part on Valentine’s Day. I love you, sweetheart. XO.” At Dave’s request, there will be no services. Donations may be made to the Jazz Angels, (562) 951 – 8410, jazzangel.org or the Historical Society of Long Beach, (562) 424-2220, hslb.org.
16 Feb 19
SCNG
Dave and Melanie Werts on New Year’s Eve 2018 at a restaurant party with longtime friends, Rich and Pat Archbold, and other friends. He died on Valentine’s Day, 2019. (Photo by Pat Archbold) This is one column I had hoped I wouldn’t be writing anytime soon. It is about a dear friend and neighbor, Dave Werts, who passed away on Valentine’s Day after a grueling battle with prostate cancer that had spread into his bone marrow. The last time my wife and I saw Dave he was wearing a silly hat on New Year’s Eve. Our get together was an annual ritual of many years with other longtime friends to welcome in the new year. Stating our resolutions for the new year became a part of that tradition. I wrote them down inside a party hat so they could be reviewed – with a lot of laughter – the next year. At our 2017 party, we were all dismayed when Dave announced that his prostate cancer had come back after five years. But the cancer had gone into remission before and we were hopeful it would again. This time, however, the cancer turned out to be a rarer form and more aggressive. Only 3 percent of prostate cancers were of the kind Dave had. He endured blood transfusions and other medications to try to hold off the disease. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] At our last New Year’s Eve get together, Dave was a little frail, but he was in incredibly good spirits despite the dour medical prognosis. “I feel pretty good, considering everything,” he told us. Ever optimistic, he said his resolutions for the new year included cleaning up the clutter in his home office. He also resolved to finish his memoirs in an autobiography he had been working on for years. After fighting long and hard with his cancer, it was a massive brain hemorrhage that finally defeated Dave in the end, according to his wife of 46 years, Melanie. “We had a lovely evening Wednesday, sharing a nice bottle of wine and ending with our usual good night kiss and I love you,” she said. But Dave had a relapse early the next morning on Valentine’s Day, and he was rushed to the emergency room at Long Beach Memorial Hospital. “He was in a coma, but I was able to hold him to say goodbye,” she said. He died a short time later at age 83. The day after Dave died, my wife, Pat, and I visited with Melanie in their home in El Dorado Park Estates a few blocks from where we live. Every day, I would go by their home on the way to work and tap a silent salute to them on my car horn. Neighbors Our friendship actually began with our wives in 1982 when their oldest son, Tavis, and our oldest daughter, Kelly, were in the same kindergarten class at Newcomb Elementary. Just by luck, Melanie and my wife chose the same day of the week to volunteer in their classroom. Our friendship grew from there. Our second daughter, Katie, and Dave’s second son, Brandon, were both born in 1980 and went to Newcomb together. In those early years Dave’s sons and their friends called Dave “The Wizard” because of his gray beard and mustache and the fact that he had a mysterious job at the aerospace company, TRW. Born in Oskaloosa, Iowa, on Aug. 10, 1935, Dave had aeronautical engineering degrees from Iowa State University and the University of Minnesota. For years, Dave couldn’t talk about anything he did at TRW because his work was classified for defense reasons. Only years later – when the projects were declassified – did Dave reveal that some of his work involved analyzing data from spy satellites, Tavis told us. “He was truly a rocket scientist; he just couldn’t talk about a lot of what he did,” Melanie said. In one of our last visits together, we all joked about how he would be taking those job secrets to the grave. It just happened too soon. Dave was great to be around. He was super smart and could talk about anything. He was even-tempered and was a calming influence no matter how hot discussions would get on certain issues. “He never raised his voice to me or anyone, and I never heard him say anything unkind about anyone,” Melanie said. He loved jazz, Stan Kenton being one of his favorites. He played the trombone in his high school’s marching band and then in the Iowa State Marching Band. The trombone rests silently in his home now. He also was on the board of the Jazz Angels, a nonprofit helping youngsters play and appreciate jazz. He was well-versed on fine wine, especially French reds. He developed a taste for wine while working in Europe for several years. Some of those bottles made their way to our dinner parties. Another passion of his was genealogical research, and he was good at that, too. He produced detailed records in book form on his family as well as Melanie’s. Long before the availability of online records, he worked for more than 15 years poring through microfilm records, such as in the famous Mormon genealogy library in Salt Lake City. I remember his glee at describing how an obscure newspaper clipping from long ago provided additional clues about his German ancestors. He also loved to ski, which he did into his seventies. Both of us shared a love of spy thrillers and would exchange books. He was an excellent photographer. He enjoyed fast cars and went to every Long Beach Grand Prix race, except two. “He also had a handful of cool cars including a 1964 Ferrari Lusso that he had when he met my mom,” Tavis said. “He sold it to buy the house in Long Beach. The car is worth more than the house now.” Someone who spends money on good wine, trips to Europe, cars and skiing trips is not really a tightwad, but Dave did have a thrifty side. He refused to pay for cable TV and, surprisingly, this expert on technology, never owned a cell phone because he didn’t want to be bothered and, besides, it costs money. I often saw him cutting his own grass as I drove by their house. He enjoyed working in his garden but had to give it up as the cancer began to take its toll. The real loves of his life were his wife and sons. He was working on a TRW project with the Federal Reserve Board in Washington, D.C. when he met a young woman, Melanie Retzsch, at a swimming pool in an apartment building where they lived in Arlington, Virginia on Memorial Day, 1972. Talk about a whirlwind romance. After 2 1⁄2 weeks dating, Dave proposed to Melanie. She said yes. I asked her if it was love at first sight. “Pretty close, I’d say,” she replied with a smile. “He was the first man I fell in love with. He told me there might be a problem because he was 36 and I was 23. He said when they got older he might slow down and want to read a book by the fireplace and maybe I wouldn’t want to do that. I told him I’d read a book with him by that fireplace.” They got married on Oct. 1, 1972 in Rochester, New York, her hometown. Dave also was always at Melanie’s side as she plunged into volunteer work with nonprofits. Melanie is a dynamo. She served nine years on the Long Beach Day Nursery Board, ending up there as president. She ran the Assistance League Thrift Shop for two years. She is currently president of the Historical Society of Long Beach. And she is on the board of the Tichenor Clinic. “No matter what I did in the community he was always at my side,” she said. “He was so supportive. He told me I could do anything I put my mind to. He was my champion.” On the night before he died, Dave told Melanie he was afraid he had not taken care of all the things he should before he passed. “He was always thinking of me,” she told me, with tears in her eyes. She said she wrote him a Valentine poem to accompany a bottle of wine every Valentine’s Day. He saved every poem and kept them in a box. She said her poem for him this Valentine’s Day was a note she put on Facebook. It read: “My darling Dave left us today. Dave was a man who truly lived his best life. Ours was a marriage of love, respect, admiration, laughter and easy companionship. I will miss his beautiful smile, his quick wit and his strength. He was my rock and the love of my life so perhaps it is fitting that we part on Valentine’s Day. I love you, sweetheart. XO.” At Dave’s request, there will be no services. Donations may be made to the Jazz Angels, (562) 951 – 8410, jazzangel.org or the Historical Society of Long Beach, (562) 424-2220, hslb.org.
16 Feb 19
1001: A Film Odyssey

The very definition of an epic film, Seven Samurai has had such a profound impact on the visual language of film that, in retrospect, it seems somewhat pedestrian. Director Akira Kurosawa essentially created the action genre that is blossoming in today’s age of superhero extravaganzas. Kurosawa’s definitive masterpiece laid the groundwork for the abundance of team-up […]