Ben Sherman

09 Dec 18
HS-Bowling Blog

NORTH ARLINGTON’S ERIC MCKENNA 719, LYNDHURST’S TROY VILLANI 650, MONTVILLE’S BEN SHERMAN 646, MORRIS KNOLLS’ NICK PATON 645, GLEN ROCK’S MATT PASSARO 634 North Arlington, NJ  12/10/18 – The NJIC Meadowlands Division had its first stab at new venue North Arlington and judging by the improved scores over last season, is pleased to be at […]

09 Dec 18
wordpresscom507 - Stephen Erdmann Foundation - Dissenter/Disinter Magazin

. RUDOLF HESS AND THE NAZI GUESSING GAME: DOPPELGANGERS AND ANTARCTIC FRONTS . By: . Steve Erdmann   Copyright. C, Steve Erdmann, 2019   Joseph P. Farrell has written many books on the secrets of the Third Nazi Reich and its continuance into a worldwide cabal of a Fourth Reich hidden through the political machinations […]

09 Dec 18
Chiefs Wire

The Ravens’ top ranked defense gets the pleasure of taking on the Chiefs’ top ranked offense in a battle of strengths on Sunday. Patrick Mahomes and his offense will face a big test, but they get to do it in the comfort of their own home. Chiefs Kingdom faithful will get an opportunity to welcome […]

09 Dec 18
JCarte's Fresh Rants

(Note: The video link is at the end. Click on the underscore.) J-360 has been a whirlwind to say the least. Throughout the semester, I’ve learned how to properly engage among various social media platforms from a public relations perspective. This is a lifelong skill that I will apply to whatever future career I choose. […]

09 Dec 18
Daily News
Four Mission League boys basketball teams — Crespi, Chaminade, Harvard-Westlake, and Notre Dame Sherman Oaks.– were in action Saturday night, all in tournament finals. Crespi, now 10-2, won the Vontoure Classic in Northern California over tournament host De La Salle, 53-45. Senior Robert Power led the Celts with 18 points, 15 of which came in the final quarter. Kyle Owens added 12 points and sophomore Colin Weems added nine points. Power and Weems were named to the all-tournament team, Owens was named tournament MVP. Photos of the squad, the All-Tournament team members (Kyle Owens ‘19, Colin Weems ‘21, and Robert Power ‘20), and the MVP (Kyle Owens). GREAT week for the Celts. Now 10-2 overall. Next game is Wednesday at home at 630 vs Newbury Park pic.twitter.com/sldj1XK0X1 — Crespi Basketball (@CrespiHoops) December 9, 2018 Harvard-Westlake (6-2) cruised past Redondo 62-39 in the Beverly Hills tournament final, led by Mason Hooks’ 13 points and 16 rebounds. Spencer Hubbard and Holden McRae were named to the all-tournament team. Hooks was named tournament MVP. El Camino Real (6-2) won the third-place game over tournament host Beverly Hills 58-50. Jahville Collins led the Conquistadores with 22 points, Tyrese Willis added 19. Notre Dame Sherman Oaks (8-3) lost to St. John Bosco in the Father Barry Classic in Northern California, 85-69, despite 27 points from Ziaire Williams and 20 points from Julian Rishwain. Williams and Rishwain were named to the all-tournament team. Chaminade (13-2) came up short in the Simi Valley tournament final to Fresno Clovis West 84-79. KJ Simpson (21 points) and Keith Higgins (18) were named to the all-tournament team. Sierra Canyon (9-0) remains unbeaten after a 77-55 win over Santa Clarita Christian on the final day of the Sierra Canyon Invitational. Cassius Stanley led the Trailblazers with 26 points, while KJ Martin had 22 and Scotty Pippen Jr. added 11. WARRIOR CLASSIC Viewpoint 105, Hart 103 (2OT) Ben Yarovinsky and Kian Nader each had 26 points for Viewpoint (3-8). Khair Jackson added 21 points and 12 rebounds. Campbell Hall 69, West Ranch 57 Jabari Walker scored 29 points, grabbed eight rebounds and had three blocks in the win. Jonny Garnett scored 11, and Chris Garnett had 10 for Campbell Hall (7-3). Heritage Chr. 80, Alemany 67 Justin Rochelin led Heritage Christian (5-3) with 20 points and nine rebounds. Kyle Frelow and Leo Williams each had 15 points. Dillon Depina had 14. Valencia 69, Calabasas 63 Richard Kawakami (15 points), Josh Assiff (13), and Kevin Konrad (10) led the Vikings (7-3). Calabasas was without leading scorer Max Cheylov, but Andrew Treiger led the Coyotes (6-3) with 17 points. Saugus 59, Granada Hills 57 Freshman Nate Perez had 30 points to lead Saugus (6-4), Camron Nale added 14 points and 11 rebounds.
09 Dec 18
SCNG
Four Mission League boys basketball teams — Crespi, Chaminade, Harvard-Westlake, and Notre Dame Sherman Oaks.– were in action Saturday night, all in tournament finals. Crespi, now 10-2, won the Vontoure Classic in Northern California over tournament host De La Salle, 53-45. Senior Robert Power led the Celts with 18 points, 15 of which came in the final quarter. Kyle Owens added 12 points and sophomore Colin Weems added nine points. Power and Weems were named to the all-tournament team, Owens was named tournament MVP. Photos of the squad, the All-Tournament team members (Kyle Owens ‘19, Colin Weems ‘21, and Robert Power ‘20), and the MVP (Kyle Owens). GREAT week for the Celts. Now 10-2 overall. Next game is Wednesday at home at 630 vs Newbury Park pic.twitter.com/sldj1XK0X1 — Crespi Basketball (@CrespiHoops) December 9, 2018 Harvard-Westlake (6-2) cruised past Redondo 62-39 in the Beverly Hills tournament final, led by Mason Hooks’ 13 points and 16 rebounds. Spencer Hubbard and Holden McRae were named to the all-tournament team. Hooks was named tournament MVP. El Camino Real (6-2) won the third-place game over tournament host Beverly Hills 58-50. Jahville Collins led the Conquistadores with 22 points, Tyrese Willis added 19. Notre Dame Sherman Oaks (8-3) lost to St. John Bosco in the Father Barry Classic in Northern California, 85-69, despite 27 points from Ziaire Williams and 20 points from Julian Rishwain. Williams and Rishwain were named to the all-tournament team. Chaminade (13-2) came up short in the Simi Valley tournament final to Fresno Clovis West 84-79. KJ Simpson (21 points) and Keith Higgins (18) were named to the all-tournament team. Sierra Canyon (9-0) remains unbeaten after a 77-55 win over Santa Clarita Christian on the final day of the Sierra Canyon Invitational. Cassius Stanley led the Trailblazers with 26 points, while KJ Martin had 22 and Scotty Pippen Jr. added 11. WARRIOR CLASSIC Viewpoint 105, Hart 103 (2OT) Ben Yarovinsky and Kian Nader each had 26 points for Viewpoint (3-8). Khair Jackson added 21 points and 12 rebounds. Campbell Hall 69, West Ranch 57 Jabari Walker scored 29 points, grabbed eight rebounds and had three blocks in the win. Jonny Garnett scored 11, and Chris Garnett had 10 for Campbell Hall (7-3). Heritage Chr. 80, Alemany 67 Justin Rochelin led Heritage Christian (5-3) with 20 points and nine rebounds. Kyle Frelow and Leo Williams each had 15 points. Dillon Depina had 14. Valencia 69, Calabasas 63 Richard Kawakami (15 points), Josh Assiff (13), and Kevin Konrad (10) led the Vikings (7-3). Calabasas was without leading scorer Max Cheylov, but Andrew Treiger led the Coyotes (6-3) with 17 points. Saugus 59, Granada Hills 57 Freshman Nate Perez had 30 points to lead Saugus (6-4), Camron Nale added 14 points and 11 rebounds.
09 Dec 18
picture and storybook

Woensdag 5 december – Chiang Mai – Doi Inthanon National Park – Het is inmiddels zaterdagochtend als ik m’n blog typ en ik ben nu in Pai. De laatste dagen zijn non-stop doorgegaan dus ik ga nu eens kijken in hoeverre ik m’n verhaal nog kan terughalen. Woensdagochtend word ik om acht uur opgehaald, tijd […]

08 Dec 18
The Scorecrow

Ladies and gentlemen, this is it. Week 14, the fantasy football playoffs. Congratulations to those of us who have reached our first goal. Now we must re-dedicate ourselves and re-focus all of our energy onto the next three weeks. It is win or go home, and I don’t know about you, but I want to win. There is one very important rule when preparing for an epic playoff run: don’t get cute. Julio Jones only had three fantasy points last week, but this week’s matchup vs the Packers should be a shootout between two bad defenses. Start Julio Jones. And don’t get thrown by a matchup and start a much less talented player in a good matchup over an elite player with a bad one. Matchups are a factor, but not the only factor.

08 Dec 18
Ultimate Music

As we edge closer to 2019, this means that a new wave of GRAMMY nominations have finally been announced. After much deliberation to who gets nominated, sorting through hundreds of submissions from hundreds of artists within the last year, the Recording Academy have finally unleashed the nominations, setting a very interesting GRAMMY’s in a couple […]

05 Dec 18
Rohingyas Genocide

U.S. Holocaust Museum, State Dept. contractor join Jewish World Watch in calling Rohingya crisis genocide December 5, 2018  News and Analysis, Rohingya Ann Strimov Durbin Ann Strimov Durbin is a human rights attorney and the Director of Advocacy and Grantmaking at Jewish World Watch. Jewish World Watch was one of the first organizations to officially call […]

08 Dec 18
Archy news nety

The 2019 Grammy nominations were announced, with hip hop artists, Kendrick Lamar and Drake. Lamar earned eight nominations, while Drake earned seven for the 61st Annual Grammy Awards. Boi-1da and Brandi Carlile have won six nominations each, while Cardi B, Childish Gambino, H.E.R., Lady Gaga, Maren Morris, Soundwave and Mike Bozzi have won five nominations […]

08 Dec 18
Big Country Preps

The Wylie boys basketball team stayed perfect in Catclaw Classic play with a pair of wins Friday, while Cooper split a pair of games and Abilene High went 0-2. The Bulldogs, who routed San Angelo Lake View 73-31 to open the tournament on Thursday, downed Bullard Brook Hill (58-38) and Canyon (57-40) on Day 2 […]

08 Dec 18
Whittier Daily News
In the end, what was it all about? The same words keep coming up when political experts and activists of various ideological stripes look back at the 2018 election and talk about its broad themes — what divided the nation, motivated voters, and led to Democrats’ gains: Trump. Partisanship. Demographic change. Trump. Balanced government. Campaign tactics. Money. Women…. Trump. Before the Nov. 6 midterm election, the Southern California News Group asked activists, party leaders, campaign pros and political scientists to identify what they believed were the themes and questions presented in this year’s state and federal elections. In the month since the election, as late-ballot counts showed that Democrats expanded their dominance of California government and captured a controlling majority in the U.S. House of Representatives, we’ve been asking many of the same observers — and others — how it played out, what message voters sent, what changed and what didn’t. “Nothing much changed in terms of (the electorate’s) partisan and ideological leanings. But the intensity of the Trump opposition allowed the Democrats to achieve much larger gains than a lot of people anticipated,” said Dan Schnur, a USC professor and former Republican spokesman and strategist, expressing a common take on last month’s results. Schnur had said before the election that the outcomes of many races would hinge on voters’ attitudes toward President Trump, and said this week that he was right (adding, “that’s a relief”). But Schnur included himself among those who didn’t anticipate that Democrats would pick up as many House seats as they did, winning in 40 districts previously represented by Republicans, far more than the net gain of 23 they needed to gain a majority. Democrats’ gains were their biggest in any midterm election since 1974, when they picked up 48 seats with Republican Gerald Ford in the White House. Over the past half century, the average pickup for an opposing party in the first midterm for a new president has been 27 seats. Still, other Republicans tried to downplay Democrats’ wins by calling them predictable — even their clean sweep of targeted seats in California, where seven House seats flipped from red to blue, five of those in Los Angeles and Orange counties. “It was fairly predictable, in California especially,” said Peter Sovich, chairman of Long Beach Republicans. “California is so anti-Trump that anyone with an R (for Republican) next to their name was already facing an uphill battle. And then they were outspent, too, with all the (campaign) money coming in from (wealthy donors) Michael Bloomberg and Tom Steyer.” Despite the data suggesting otherwise, David Hadley, vice chairman of the California Republican Party and a former Assemblyman from L.A.’s South Bay, said the November election results were “surprisingly typical” for the first midterm of a new presidential administration. But he also termed it an atypical “wipeout of pretty historical proportions” within California. Hadley attributed Democrats’ capturing the House — while Republicans strengthening their hold on the U.S. Senate — to voters’ preference for divided government following a period of Republican control, Democrats’ more effective use of newly legal methods of getting their supporters to vote, and what he views as news-media biases that pose obstacles to GOP candidates delivering their messages. Hadley chided people who hyped the election as the last chance to head off attacks on democracy by an authoritarian-minded president. “The 2018 elections should be an intellectual embarrassment to the people who were claiming that fascism was ascending and democracy was descending in the United States,” Hadley said, Progressive activist Noah Edelson, a network creative director who lives in Sherman Oaks, had said before the election that he feared Republican victories would allow Trump to chip away at democracy. Told about Hadley’s argument that the 2018 midterms showed democracy is alive and well, Edelson agreed only to a point. “On its face, (the election was) normal. But when we have someone in the White House who does not believe in compromise, who idealizes dictators, we have a problem,” Edelson said. Edelson said the Democrats’ House victory brings “equilibrium” to government. A pro-Trump activist and leader of Make California Great Again, Jo Reitkopp, tried to cast doubt on the election results. “To be fair to both sides, I personally do not have evidence of voter fraud,” Reitkopp said, before questioning the process that saw Democrats surge to victory thanks to mail-in and provisional ballots counted in the days after Nov. 6. “But I think the consensus among conservatives and people who have supported our candidates is that we don’t believe these were legitimate results.” But with results all but official, political scientists in Southern California who have been studying voting data said the election was distinguished by high turnout, highly partisan voting patterns, and the effects of Democrat-friendly demographic shifts and district-line shifts in key areas of the country. More than usual, specifics about candidates and issues mattered less to voters than did the candidate’s party registration. “Partisan dominated to a spectacular extent. Once a district was ready to flip (from Republican to Democratic), the candidate characteristics didn’t seem to matter all that much,” said Marcia Godwin, professor of public administration at the University of La Verne, who said congressional election results could generally be predicted by whether districts leaned toward Trump or Democrat Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential election. Godwin noted that a “wide variety” of Democratic candidates won, ranging from Orange County’s Harley Rouda, who “more or less ran as a Reagan Republican that the Republican Party had left behind,” to Los Angeles County’s Katie Hill and Orange County’s Katie Porter, who “ran on progressive platforms.” Veteran Democratic campaign consultant Bill Carrick pointed out that none of the seven Democratic candidates who flipped Republican congressional seats have held public office before, and only one had previously run for office. Although specific issues may have mattered less than in other elections, Carrick said, it appeared one issue that was a factor in races across the country was health care. Democrats were helped, he said, by voters’ increasing support for the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare). And although voters seemed to vote more for the party than the person, the election also produced increases in the number of women and black members of Congress. Christen Hebrard, president of Black Los Angeles Young Democrats, had hoped before the election that she would see victories by African Americans Stacey Abrams for George governor, Andrew Gillum for Florida governor and Ben Jealous for Maryland governor. All were defeated. But reading between lines in the result tables, Hebrard saw “extraordinary success” in the fact that Abrams and Gillum came closer to winning than any other Democrats in their states since the 1990s. “It showed you can run black candidates statewide,” Hebrard said. “This midterm election was notice being delivered to Democratic leaders and funders: It has to include all of us.” Interviews with political insiders and politics watchers demonstrated that it was easier to agree on what the election was “about” before the election than it is now. Going in, the midterm looked like a gut-level choice between competing visions of America. Coming out, it’s all that — and more. One thing should be clear to everybody, Schnur said: This remains “an extraordinarily divided country.”
08 Dec 18
San Gabriel Valley Tribune
In the end, what was it all about? The same words keep coming up when political experts and activists of various ideological stripes look back at the 2018 election and talk about its broad themes — what divided the nation, motivated voters, and led to Democrats’ gains: Trump. Partisanship. Demographic change. Trump. Balanced government. Campaign tactics. Money. Women…. Trump. Before the Nov. 6 midterm election, the Southern California News Group asked activists, party leaders, campaign pros and political scientists to identify what they believed were the themes and questions presented in this year’s state and federal elections. In the month since the election, as late-ballot counts showed that Democrats expanded their dominance of California government and captured a controlling majority in the U.S. House of Representatives, we’ve been asking many of the same observers — and others — how it played out, what message voters sent, what changed and what didn’t. “Nothing much changed in terms of (the electorate’s) partisan and ideological leanings. But the intensity of the Trump opposition allowed the Democrats to achieve much larger gains than a lot of people anticipated,” said Dan Schnur, a USC professor and former Republican spokesman and strategist, expressing a common take on last month’s results. Schnur had said before the election that the outcomes of many races would hinge on voters’ attitudes toward President Trump, and said this week that he was right (adding, “that’s a relief”). But Schnur included himself among those who didn’t anticipate that Democrats would pick up as many House seats as they did, winning in 40 districts previously represented by Republicans, far more than the net gain of 23 they needed to gain a majority. Democrats’ gains were their biggest in any midterm election since 1974, when they picked up 48 seats with Republican Gerald Ford in the White House. Over the past half century, the average pickup for an opposing party in the first midterm for a new president has been 27 seats. Still, other Republicans tried to downplay Democrats’ wins by calling them predictable — even their clean sweep of targeted seats in California, where seven House seats flipped from red to blue, five of those in Los Angeles and Orange counties. “It was fairly predictable, in California especially,” said Peter Sovich, chairman of Long Beach Republicans. “California is so anti-Trump that anyone with an R (for Republican) next to their name was already facing an uphill battle. And then they were outspent, too, with all the (campaign) money coming in from (wealthy donors) Michael Bloomberg and Tom Steyer.” Despite the data suggesting otherwise, David Hadley, vice chairman of the California Republican Party and a former Assemblyman from L.A.’s South Bay, said the November election results were “surprisingly typical” for the first midterm of a new presidential administration. But he also termed it an atypical “wipeout of pretty historical proportions” within California. Hadley attributed Democrats’ capturing the House — while Republicans strengthening their hold on the U.S. Senate — to voters’ preference for divided government following a period of Republican control, Democrats’ more effective use of newly legal methods of getting their supporters to vote, and what he views as news-media biases that pose obstacles to GOP candidates delivering their messages. Hadley chided people who hyped the election as the last chance to head off attacks on democracy by an authoritarian-minded president. “The 2018 elections should be an intellectual embarrassment to the people who were claiming that fascism was ascending and democracy was descending in the United States,” Hadley said, Progressive activist Noah Edelson, a network creative director who lives in Sherman Oaks, had said before the election that he feared Republican victories would allow Trump to chip away at democracy. Told about Hadley’s argument that the 2018 midterms showed democracy is alive and well, Edelson agreed only to a point. “On its face, (the election was) normal. But when we have someone in the White House who does not believe in compromise, who idealizes dictators, we have a problem,” Edelson said. Edelson said the Democrats’ House victory brings “equilibrium” to government. A pro-Trump activist and leader of Make California Great Again, Jo Reitkopp, tried to cast doubt on the election results. “To be fair to both sides, I personally do not have evidence of voter fraud,” Reitkopp said, before questioning the process that saw Democrats surge to victory thanks to mail-in and provisional ballots counted in the days after Nov. 6. “But I think the consensus among conservatives and people who have supported our candidates is that we don’t believe these were legitimate results.” But with results all but official, political scientists in Southern California who have been studying voting data said the election was distinguished by high turnout, highly partisan voting patterns, and the effects of Democrat-friendly demographic shifts and district-line shifts in key areas of the country. More than usual, specifics about candidates and issues mattered less to voters than did the candidate’s party registration. “Partisan dominated to a spectacular extent. Once a district was ready to flip (from Republican to Democratic), the candidate characteristics didn’t seem to matter all that much,” said Marcia Godwin, professor of public administration at the University of La Verne, who said congressional election results could generally be predicted by whether districts leaned toward Trump or Democrat Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential election. Godwin noted that a “wide variety” of Democratic candidates won, ranging from Orange County’s Harley Rouda, who “more or less ran as a Reagan Republican that the Republican Party had left behind,” to Los Angeles County’s Katie Hill and Orange County’s Katie Porter, who “ran on progressive platforms.” Veteran Democratic campaign consultant Bill Carrick pointed out that none of the seven Democratic candidates who flipped Republican congressional seats have held public office before, and only one had previously run for office. Although specific issues may have mattered less than in other elections, Carrick said, it appeared one issue that was a factor in races across the country was health care. Democrats were helped, he said, by voters’ increasing support for the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare). And although voters seemed to vote more for the party than the person, the election also produced increases in the number of women and black members of Congress. Christen Hebrard, president of Black Los Angeles Young Democrats, had hoped before the election that she would see victories by African Americans Stacey Abrams for George governor, Andrew Gillum for Florida governor and Ben Jealous for Maryland governor. All were defeated. But reading between lines in the result tables, Hebrard saw “extraordinary success” in the fact that Abrams and Gillum came closer to winning than any other Democrats in their states since the 1990s. “It showed you can run black candidates statewide,” Hebrard said. “This midterm election was notice being delivered to Democratic leaders and funders: It has to include all of us.” Interviews with political insiders and politics watchers demonstrated that it was easier to agree on what the election was “about” before the election than it is now. Going in, the midterm looked like a gut-level choice between competing visions of America. Coming out, it’s all that — and more. One thing should be clear to everybody, Schnur said: This remains “an extraordinarily divided country.”
08 Dec 18
Press Telegram
In the end, what was it all about? The same words keep coming up when political experts and activists of various ideological stripes look back at the 2018 election and talk about its broad themes — what divided the nation, motivated voters, and led to Democrats’ gains: Trump. Partisanship. Demographic change. Trump. Balanced government. Campaign tactics. Money. Women…. Trump. Before the Nov. 6 midterm election, the Southern California News Group asked activists, party leaders, campaign pros and political scientists to identify what they believed were the themes and questions presented in this year’s state and federal elections. In the month since the election, as late-ballot counts showed that Democrats expanded their dominance of California government and captured a controlling majority in the U.S. House of Representatives, we’ve been asking many of the same observers — and others — how it played out, what message voters sent, what changed and what didn’t. “Nothing much changed in terms of (the electorate’s) partisan and ideological leanings. But the intensity of the Trump opposition allowed the Democrats to achieve much larger gains than a lot of people anticipated,” said Dan Schnur, a USC professor and former Republican spokesman and strategist, expressing a common take on last month’s results. Schnur had said before the election that the outcomes of many races would hinge on voters’ attitudes toward President Trump, and said this week that he was right (adding, “that’s a relief”). But Schnur included himself among those who didn’t anticipate that Democrats would pick up as many House seats as they did, winning in 40 districts previously represented by Republicans, far more than the net gain of 23 they needed to gain a majority. Democrats’ gains were their biggest in any midterm election since 1974, when they picked up 48 seats with Republican Gerald Ford in the White House. Over the past half century, the average pickup for an opposing party in the first midterm for a new president has been 27 seats. Still, other Republicans tried to downplay Democrats’ wins by calling them predictable — even their clean sweep of targeted seats in California, where seven House seats flipped from red to blue, five of those in Los Angeles and Orange counties. “It was fairly predictable, in California especially,” said Peter Sovich, chairman of Long Beach Republicans. “California is so anti-Trump that anyone with an R (for Republican) next to their name was already facing an uphill battle. And then they were outspent, too, with all the (campaign) money coming in from (wealthy donors) Michael Bloomberg and Tom Steyer.” Despite the data suggesting otherwise, David Hadley, vice chairman of the California Republican Party and a former Assemblyman from L.A.’s South Bay, said the November election results were “surprisingly typical” for the first midterm of a new presidential administration. But he also termed it an atypical “wipeout of pretty historical proportions” within California. Hadley attributed Democrats’ capturing the House — while Republicans strengthening their hold on the U.S. Senate — to voters’ preference for divided government following a period of Republican control, Democrats’ more effective use of newly legal methods of getting their supporters to vote, and what he views as news-media biases that pose obstacles to GOP candidates delivering their messages. Hadley chided people who hyped the election as the last chance to head off attacks on democracy by an authoritarian-minded president. “The 2018 elections should be an intellectual embarrassment to the people who were claiming that fascism was ascending and democracy was descending in the United States,” Hadley said, Progressive activist Noah Edelson, a network creative director who lives in Sherman Oaks, had said before the election that he feared Republican victories would allow Trump to chip away at democracy. Told about Hadley’s argument that the 2018 midterms showed democracy is alive and well, Edelson agreed only to a point. “On its face, (the election was) normal. But when we have someone in the White House who does not believe in compromise, who idealizes dictators, we have a problem,” Edelson said. Edelson said the Democrats’ House victory brings “equilibrium” to government. A pro-Trump activist and leader of Make California Great Again, Jo Reitkopp, tried to cast doubt on the election results. “To be fair to both sides, I personally do not have evidence of voter fraud,” Reitkopp said, before questioning the process that saw Democrats surge to victory thanks to mail-in and provisional ballots counted in the days after Nov. 6. “But I think the consensus among conservatives and people who have supported our candidates is that we don’t believe these were legitimate results.” But with results all but official, political scientists in Southern California who have been studying voting data said the election was distinguished by high turnout, highly partisan voting patterns, and the effects of Democrat-friendly demographic shifts and district-line shifts in key areas of the country. More than usual, specifics about candidates and issues mattered less to voters than did the candidate’s party registration. “Partisan dominated to a spectacular extent. Once a district was ready to flip (from Republican to Democratic), the candidate characteristics didn’t seem to matter all that much,” said Marcia Godwin, professor of public administration at the University of La Verne, who said congressional election results could generally be predicted by whether districts leaned toward Trump or Democrat Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential election. Godwin noted that a “wide variety” of Democratic candidates won, ranging from Orange County’s Harley Rouda, who “more or less ran as a Reagan Republican that the Republican Party had left behind,” to Los Angeles County’s Katie Hill and Orange County’s Katie Porter, who “ran on progressive platforms.” Veteran Democratic campaign consultant Bill Carrick pointed out that none of the seven Democratic candidates who flipped Republican congressional seats have held public office before, and only one had previously run for office. Although specific issues may have mattered less than in other elections, Carrick said, it appeared one issue that was a factor in races across the country was health care. Democrats were helped, he said, by voters’ increasing support for the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare). And although voters seemed to vote more for the party than the person, the election also produced increases in the number of women and black members of Congress. Christen Hebrard, president of Black Los Angeles Young Democrats, had hoped before the election that she would see victories by African Americans Stacey Abrams for George governor, Andrew Gillum for Florida governor and Ben Jealous for Maryland governor. All were defeated. But reading between lines in the result tables, Hebrard saw “extraordinary success” in the fact that Abrams and Gillum came closer to winning than any other Democrats in their states since the 1990s. “It showed you can run black candidates statewide,” Hebrard said. “This midterm election was notice being delivered to Democratic leaders and funders: It has to include all of us.” Interviews with political insiders and politics watchers demonstrated that it was easier to agree on what the election was “about” before the election than it is now. Going in, the midterm looked like a gut-level choice between competing visions of America. Coming out, it’s all that — and more. One thing should be clear to everybody, Schnur said: This remains “an extraordinarily divided country.”