Betula

17 Dec 18
Jenny Methven

I am delighted that my poem The Ice Moon has been included in The Curlew’s latest magazine, Betula. The Curlew is a voluntary, non profit venture, supporting conservation projects around the world.

16 Dec 18
Waringwords

To cap off a brilliant week my copy of The Curlew ‘Betula’ Issue arrived today featuring my poem ‘Mouth’ plus wonderful contributions from fellow poets Raine Geoghegan, Rebecca Gethin, Hannah Stone, Lesley Quayle, Attracta Fahy and others. Thank you editor Dr Lynn Parr for producing such a beautiful journal, it is available to buy via […]

16 Dec 18
AESTHETE

Made by: CosRX is a Korean Beauty brand that stands for cosmetics RX and specializes in using ingredients that are basically medicine for your skin.Bought from Soko Glam for $11 online. *Try to always buy Skincare products from a website and not always on Ebay or Amazon because some sellers will sell you fake products* […]

14 Dec 18
Twin Cities
I bought a Christmas tree yesterday. Actually, two. The first is a balsam. To me, Christmas smells like Abies balsamaea. Its long-lasting fragrance is the opposite of the foul odor produced by last week’s topic, stink bugs. Balsam looks like Christmas, too. That’s partly because of the way the slender branches grow from the trunk, just like in pictures kids draw of Christmas trees. The balsam’s lower branches produce what’s known as “two-ranked” needles, meaning they grow on opposite sides of the stem. Both these attributes — its airy branching habit and its flat needles — makes the balsam easy to decorate. This also lends to that old-fashioned Christmas-tree look. This year, I drove to the tree lot in a Grinch-like mood, determined to bring home a tree half the size of last year’s 18-foot monster. My mood improved when I spied something completely different: In addition to evergreens, the lot was selling 12- to 25-foot-tall paper birch trees (Betula papyrifera). They were dead, of course, but then so were the evergreens. And the price was right: $14. I bought one of each, a birch and a balsam. When I got them indoors, I discovered another good thing about birches, besides their pretty white bark. Since they don’t have foliage, they don’t have to be watered. I decided not to give the birch a tree stand at all. To hold it upright, I tied it with string to two vertical plumbing pipes in a corner of the dining room. The base of the trunk is encircled in a white terry cloth bath towel. It’s supposed to look like snow. The balsam sits in a proper tree stand (the kind with a water receptacle built in) in the kitchen. I’m not sure how a dead tree can suck up water, but apparently it can. The Christmas Tree Association says most trees drink as much as a quart of water a day, especially in the first week or so. The association does not recommend adding what it calls “home concoctions” such as fertilizer, bleach or aspirin or even “commercial additives” to the water. The fresh cut made after the tree is purchased should be 6 inches or more above the base of the trunk. The tree isn’t actively drinking the water, but just like a dry sponge, its tissues are absorbing it. Also like a sponge, it works better if slightly damp to begin with. Dry cells actually repel water. This is what happens when you let plants growing in peat moss dry out completely. Water rolls off the root ball. It’s also what happens when a birch tree dies. I’ll get to that in a minute. I was so delighted by my birch once I’d strung it with lights and hung ornaments, that I considered cutting down one of the birch trees in my garden to create a sort of woodland glade, on the theory that if one’s good, then two must be twice as good. The tree in question began dying last summer from the top down. Maybe, I thought, the trouble was its proximity to a limestone path. Lime turns soil alkaline. This can prevent a birch tree from absorbing iron. Chlorosis can set in, causing the tree to drop its leaves and then die. I put off removing the birch until I was sure. I’m glad I waited. A Canadian forestry researcher named David Langor, who lives in Edmonton, Ontario, set out to learn the cause of a general decline in birch trees that began in North America in the early 2000s. His study blames climate change — a combination of drought and more frequent freeze-thaw periods in the winter. “Birch is a very shallow-rooted species, so it’s likely to show impacts of drought soonest,” Langor says. “We get sap movement, and that’s followed by freeze-up. That’s likely causing some damage to the conductive tissue. This all manifests in the death of the top of the trees. “That’s where a beetle — the bronze birch borer — works its way into the dead part of the tree and continues to slowly move through the trees.” Paper birches are “born” with reddish brown bark, which whitens after about four seasons. It’s hard to imagine our Minnesota wilderness in winter without the lovely white trunks of the paper birch sprouting from the snow, but B. papyifera is a temperamental species, even in the best of conditions. Shallow-rooted with a lifespan of just 60 years, on account of their spectral beauty I think of them as the Ophelias of the forest. Paper birch is actually quite new to the North Woods, having shown up after the original stands of pine, cedar and spruce were removed by loggers. Fires that swept through in the 1920s and ‘30s finished the job, creating the perfect growing medium for birch. Opportunism is not the same as resilience. Which is why so many homeowners who’ve invested small fortunes in fancy landscapes populated by landscape architects’ favorite tree — birch trees are lovely planted in groups, either as clumps or in rows, say, lining a long driveway — often regret their decision. Long after the bill is paid and the designer gone, the birches begin to show signs of stress. Even when weather isn’t challenging, they can be picky about moisture — not too much but not too little. You know you’ve got trouble when you see the upper branches wilt. The leaves turn yellow. The twigs snap off instead of bending, a sign that water has been unable to reach them. The good news, Langor says, is that a stricken tree can be saved if you address these problems early. [related_articles location=”right” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]The lower branches of my sick paper birch look fine. If it’s a borer infestation and not too far advanced, I should be able to stop the bugs in their tracks just by removing the diseased portion. “The live branches below that cut will take over leadership and will continue to grow,” Langor says. “The tree will look beautiful within three or four years.” He adds that the dead branches can be used as firewood, though if not burned immediately the insects inside the wood may spread to other trees.
14 Dec 18
Miles Hearn

Grey Abbey Park is named after a small village in Northern Ireland. It is located near the bottom of Morningside Drive and follows the top of the Scarborough Bluffs. There are obvious signs of erosion here: which is why we see this sign: Some views of the lake: and of the woods: Despite the overcast […]

13 Dec 18
Wild Life of Gus

INTRO: It was pointed out to me that reading over 2000 words (it might have been nearer 3000) is a bit much for most people so I’ve taken one massive blog post and cut it into smaller sections. Hopefully it’s more manageable this way. I do a lot of both wandering and wondering, often in […]

13 Dec 18
Lynn Pryor

The beauty of the birth of Christ is it didn’t just happened. In God’s great foreknowledge, He knew we’d sin, yet even before we sinned, He put a plan in place to bring us back to Him. So the events that we remember and celebrate at Christmas didn’t just happen; they were on God’s radar […]

13 Dec 18
Fair Winds & Following Seas

This is the start of what will hopefully be an ongoing series of blog posts on various boats, ships, and stuff that travels the seas.  My hope is to build a sort of catalogue of the various types of vessels that have sailed the oceans throughout history.  Some posts may cover broad classes and design […]

12 Dec 18
Drone Below

Nowadays, forest inventory, monitoring and assessment requires accurate tree species identification and mapping. According to recent experiences with multi-spectral data from small fixed-wing and rotary blade unmanned aerial vehicles – there is a role for this technology in the emerging paradigm of enhanced forest inventory (FFI). The Main Discriminators of Forest Tree Species According to […]

12 Dec 18
The Natural Corner

Slimming Herbal Blend helps to regulate the metabolism, which helps to lose weight. Carefully selected herbs improve the well-being of diabetes, regulating blood glucose levels. Infusion of herbs, drunk regularly, improves metabolism and speeds up slimming. Ingredients: Betula pendula, Equisetum arvense, Hypericum perforatum, Trifolium pratense, Polygonum aviculare, Filipendula ulmaria, Elymus repens, Melissa, Bidens tripartita, Cichorium intybus, […]

12 Dec 18
The Natural Corner

Herbal Blend for the Kidney tea is recommended for kidney diseases such as urolithiasis. The blend enriches the body with micronutrients and vitamins, boosts the immune system, and improves general well-being in urinary tract diseases (also shows excellent preventive properties). Sage, black walnut leaves, and birch result in anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, anesthetic, and diuretic properties. The […]

12 Dec 18
Robb Report UK
  Aspen, Colorado Nestled at the base of Aspen Mountain, the Little Nell looks like a scene from a holiday movie—think windows framed with snow, emerald pine trees, and glowing Christmas lights. Each December, the boutique hotel goes all-out with festive decorations and seasonal menus at its five-star restaurant, Element 47, and the more casual Ajax Tavern, which guests can practically ski right into. Even if you can’t make it to the hotel’s annual tree lighting ceremony on December 9—complete with carolers, hot cocoa, ‘reindeer pups’ from the Aspen Animal Shelter, and, of course, Santa Claus—there will still be plenty of holiday spirit to go around, including decadent Christmas Eve dinners at both of the property’s restaurants. In addition to a guaranteed white Christmas, the Little Nell is also within walking distance of some of this season’s hottest new openings, including EMP Winter House and Betula—both of which are also sure to be decked out in festive finery.
11 Dec 18
greydinner2

?3). The most outstanding illustrations are usually three-dimensionally stored flowers, first identified simply by Friis inside a Past due Cretaceous vicinity throughout southeast Sweden (Friis & Skarby, 1981). Historic that will fire maintained the fine detail associated with charcoalified plants, fruits, seeds along with other internal organs associated with angiosperms, together with co-occurring gymnosperms and […]

10 Dec 18
Notebook

Little bluestem grass is a prairie species, the one that glowed like red “wine-stains” for Willa Cather in Nebraska. Here I found it to be the dominant species on a Boston Bay clifftop.

09 Dec 18
Wild Life of Gus

I do a lot of both wandering and wondering, often in woodlands, however I usually need to write down my thoughts as they come to me or soon afterwards otherwise I forget them. Unfortunately, due to exams, I didn’t really feel I could type up a blog after my visits to various woodlands as I […]

09 Dec 18
Katzenworld Shop

To make your Christmas tree a spectacular home feature this festive season, we have an abundance of hanging decorations that have been thoughtfully designed and selected. We also have a range of hanging adornments that will look fabulous on the wall. Don’t say we don’t spoil you.

Capture the innocence and playfulness of the festive season with the Christmas Fun collection. Charmingly quirky, sweet and cheeky, this range features some characters that you won’t help but want to take home. With a bright colour scheme, this collection embodies the spirit of Christmas with an abundance of Sass & Belle charm.