Biannual

21 May 19
The Contemporary

Though sexual activity in college has declined, STI rates continue to rise and sexual assault remains a persistent problem on college campuses.

21 May 19
World Best News

Biannual exercise to go paperless from The Hindu – National Biannual exercise to go paperless http://bit.ly/2YEfyw7

21 May 19
Sydny Elyse

1) Guerlain Météorites Primer Perfecting Pearls ($74) This product claims to smooth and color-correct for a radiant complexion. It has “pearls” of powder within the primer that are meant to neutralize excess oil, keeping the skin matte and even. While I cannot speak to its color-correcting properties, it is a summer staple for me. This product […]

21 May 19
The Australian

Staff at the University of Canberra have won concessions over workloads and pay increases in a new enterprise agreement struck with management. About 51 per cent of eligible staff voted and 77 per cent of them were in favour of the agreement.

21 May 19
Archy Worldys

The United Nations Security Council blacklisted Azhar on 1 May after China's permanent veto member lifted its technical influence over the US, UK and French proposal to put him on the list. The Pakistani-based Jaish-e-Mohammed chief Masood Azhar, a UN Security Council global terrorist, has been described by member states as an "important achievement" for […]

21 May 19
DL's Travels

May 1, 2019 First Jumbo, next Yoroniku, a few yakiniku giants are trying to establish their presences in the lucrative Hong Kong market. Amid this massive invasion, a loyal legion of supporters still swears the best yakiniku joint in town is in fact Nikushou, opened in 2016 at a Causeway Bay highrise by Anthony Ng, […]

21 May 19
Santa Cruz Sentinel
I served on the board of a small bi-coastal cultural organization that held biannual meetings in the spring and fall. One was scheduled for late September of 2001, in New York City, so Janet and I made arrangements to stay with a Santa Cruz friend at her 16th-floor sublet near Wall Street. In the days after 9/11, board members agreed to stay the course, and so we went. Street sweepers ran all night through her neighborhood, five blocks from Ground Zero. A telephone company trailer parked in front of her building offered free calls anywhere in the world to those needing to stay in touch. From her balcony, we studied the searchlight beacons blazing their trail to heaven from the site of the fallen towers. In an ad hoc gallery in SoHo, emailed photos of the tragedy—professional and amateur—were printed out and hung as they were received in an ongoing, ever-changing memorial exhibit. In that moment, New York was a city of artists. As I stood mesmerized before an image of a kitchen table blanketed in the grey dust of thousands, drifted like snow against shakers, sugar bowl and coffee mugs, my host came up behind me and said that that was what she’d found when she returned to her own apartment that day, two weeks and a world ago. It was hard to imagine. We got to spend time around a lot of people we knew. Every one of them was eager to tell us where they were when it happened, and what they’d experienced. A dozen years after the Loma Prieta earthquake, that impulse to tell one’s story was still so familiar to me. How many times did each of us here tell our personal earthquake story to strangers and to each other? It was in the telling that we reestablished our place in the community after so terrible a disruption; telling was our way of re-joining, of remembering. In New York, I was a willing listener, grateful to keep the gift moving. Shrines and memorials had sprung up at every fire and police station, and then blossomed and spread like graffiti along sidewalks and storefronts, anonymous tokens of a unanimous sentiment of irrepressible gratitude and sorrow. Santa Cruz artists rallied after our earthquake. Demolished buildings hosted site-specific installations that invited us back to a quarantined and abandoned Pacific Avenue. Renee Flower’s newsprint wrapping paper marked holiday gifts purchased from the displaced businesses sheltered in tents along Cedar and Front, each gift a proud and tangible mark of hope. And then we were finally willing to look past what we couldn’t save and to begin to imagine a new downtown, one that was different but was still Santa Cruz. Today, when one enters the elevator for the one-minute ride to the hundredth floor of the new World Trade Center, a panoramic video begins playing on three walls of the car. You emerge from the ground of prehistory, and New York appears to grow as you rise. From forest to village to town to city to metropolis, each generation of buildings dwarfing and supplanting the last, the Twin Towers appearing and vanishing and the new structure rising and solidifying around you until there you are at the top and the door opens to the sweeping vista of today. There’s even a timeline clicking off the decades, and a diagram showing how high you’ve risen. In 1819, Manhattan was the scale of Santa Cruz today. Today, when someone insists that Santa Cruz is “built out,” I take that to mean that they have personally reached the limits of their own imagination. There can be no empathy without imagination, and no community without empathy. The planet is not likely to end in their lifetime; it didn’t on 9/11, nor after Loma Prieta. This community will continue to change and–adequately housed or not—to grow. Antagonism and fear have had their day, engendering only scarcity and congestion. Now is the time for imagination and empathy, art and generosity, and the hope that they alone inspire. Mark Primack can be reached at mark@markprimack.com. Contributions to the Elizabeth Butler Home/Studio Fund can be made at Lighthouse bank.
20 May 19
Welcome

Billings has overhauled the agreements it keeps with its three urban renewal districts, giving the city more direct oversight of the groups. City leaders had started looking at updating these memorandums of understanding, or MOUs as they’re known, last year. The Downtown Billings Partnership’s MOU had expired years ago and had never been updated. The […]

20 May 19
Dubois County Free Press

 Kimball announced Thursday that its Helio task chair captured a #Metropolislikes Award during NYCxDESIGN. #Metropolislikes is Metropolis Magazine’s biannual award program that takes place in New York City during NYCxDESIGN and Chicago during NeoCon. NYCxDESIGN is New York City’s official celebration of design that takes place throughout the city until Wednesday. Metropolis editors selected their […]

20 May 19
Wikimedia Foundation
The Wikimedia Foundation has supported free access to the sum of all knowledge for nearly sixteen years. This longstanding vision would not be possible without the dedication of community members who contribute content to the Wikimedia projects. As a global platform for free knowledge, we are sometimes approached by governments and private parties with requests to delete or change project content, or to release nonpublic user information. The Foundation consistently evaluates such requests with an eye towards protecting privacy and freedom of expression. We are committed to sharing data about our responses to these requests with the diverse communities of Wikimedians who contribute to the projects we support. Twice a year, we publish a transparency report outlining the number of requests we received, their types, countries of origin, and other information. The report also features an FAQ and stories about interesting and unusual cases. A few highlights: Content alteration and takedown requests. From July to December of 2018, we received 492 requests to alter or remove project content. We did not make any changes to project content as a result, but often encouraged the requesters to work with the user communities to address their concerns. 195 of these requests were Right to Erasure-based requests related to user accounts. When we receive such a request, we provide the user information on the community-driven vanishing process. The volunteer contributors who build, grow, and improve the Wikimedia projects follow community-created policies that ensure project content is appropriate and well-sourced. We support the communities’ prerogative to determine what educational content belongs on the projects. Copyright takedown requests. The Wikimedia communities work diligently to ensure that copyrighted material is not uploaded to the projects without an appropriate free license or exception, such as fair use. Most Wikimedia project content is therefore freely licensed or in the public domain. When we occasionally receive Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) notices asking us to remove allegedly infringing material, we conduct thorough investigations to make sure the claims are valid. From July to December of 2018, we received only five DMCA requests, and granted none of them. This low number is due to the hard work of community volunteers who ensure that content on the projects is properly licensed. Requests for user data. The Wikimedia Foundation only grants requests for user data that comply with our requests for user information procedures and guidelines (which includes a provision for emergency conditions). The Foundation also collects little nonpublic user information in the first place, as part of our commitment to user privacy, and retains that information for a short amount of time. Of the 24 user data requests we received, only four resulted in disclosure of nonpublic user information. In addition to updating the online report, we have also released an updated version of our print edition, providing detailed figures for the last six months of requests. These print versions will be available at Wikimedia Foundation events. The Wikimedia Foundation’s biannual transparency report reaffirms our commitment to transparency, privacy, and freedom of expression. It also reflects the diligent work of the Wikimedia community members who shape the projects. We invite you to learn more about requests we received in the past six months in our comprehensive transparency report. For information about past reports, please see our previous blog posts. Jim Buatti, Legal Counsel Leighanna Mixter, Legal Counsel Aeryn Palmer, Senior Legal Counsel Wikimedia Foundation The transparency report would not be possible without the contributions of Jacob Rogers, Katie Francis, Rachel Stallman, Stella Chang, Benson Chao, Linnea Doan, Joe Sutherland, Patrick Johnson, Prateek Saxena, Jan Gerlach, and the Wikimedia Foundation’s Digital Media team. The print edition of the report is produced by Oscar Printing Company.
20 May 19
Nick Louras

In Issue 38 of Faunus: The Journal of the Friends of Arthur Machen, Godfrey Brangham tells a story related to him by Machen’s daughter Janet, about her father and his friend, the occultist Arthur Edward Waite. Waite famously designed the Rider-Waite tarot deck with illustrator Pamela Coleman Smith. Brangham writes: During one soiree when they were […]