Billy Goat

24 Feb 19
travelwithjimbo

Last night, Peggy and I went to the Brauntex Performing Arts Theater to see Red Steagall.  I found out things about Red that I never knew.  For instance, he wrote songs for years before he ever recorded.  He has been named, at different times, the Cowboy Poet of the State of Texas, and the Poet […]

23 Feb 19

NEW MYTH CROSSES TIME

All advertisements belong to WordPress.com therefore New Myth Crosses Time:  A Mission Vision for our Global Ascension is not receiving any of the proceeds!!! Prologue Geologists claim that our Planetary electromagnetic polar shifts have occurred 181 times since our Planet was born 4.5 billion years ago.  That means from our Planet’s perspective our Galactic electromagnetic […]

23 Feb 19
The Irish Sun
FIRST the bones, then the eardrums, then the pride. The battering and bruising was thorough and relentless as England’s Grand Slam hopes were obliterated by a passionate Welsh onslaught — on and off the pitch. Josh Adams juggles the ball before collecting and touching down to raise the roof at the Principality Stadium Adams’ incredible try sent Cardiff into delirium “The world hasn’t ended, mate,” said Eddie Jones afterwards. But for a moment, it sounded like it had. That was when Josh Adams produced a massive leap to rob Elliot Daly, collect Dan Biggar’s kick and go over for the late try which confirmed the Dragons’ victory. The roar was so booming you expected to see a nuclear mushroom cloud in the sky. Gallons of ale were sprayed around the Principality Stadium in a display of joyous wastefulness. The brawn, then the local Brain’s beer. This was going to be the mother of all celebrations in the land of their fathers. A record 12th straight victory for the national team and, even more importantly, a bloody nose for the damned English. England strutted to emphatic victories over Ireland and France to mark themselves out as Six Nations favourites. But as soon as they were faced with a genuine challenge, Jones’ men lost their heads and wilted as they chucked away a 10-3 half-time lead. Cory Hill’s try swung the momentum in Wales’ favour Tom Curry dances through to score the first try of the game for England Wales coach Warren Gatland called it right when he singled out England’s Kyle Sinckler as an ‘emotional time bomb’ and a couple of moments of indiscipline from the Harlequins prop turned the tide. If Gatland does end up being interviewed as Jones’ successor as England boss after the World Cup, the New Zealander can add clairvoyance to his long list of attributes. As is customary on these occasions, Gatland cited English arrogance — real or imaginary — as a motivation. In truth, an England team which finished fifth in the Six Nations last year was never quite as good as has been suggested by those wins in Dublin and over the French at Twickenham. They also missed the might of the injured Mako Vunipola and Maro Itoje, not that there will be any Welsh sympathy for a nation with such vast resources. England were in command when Curry scored the opening try… but the second half was a different story Wales still need wins over Scotland and Ireland to beat England to the title and secure a Grand Slam. But with the key clash against the Irish here in Cardiff on March 16, you would not bet against them. Because, while Gatland’s players were exceptional, it is difficult to overestimate the impact of this Welsh crowd. Asked whether the atmosphere had made a difference, Jones replied: “It always does mate — that’s why you have home and away. “You have to be good enough to cope with it and we weren’t.” The roars which greeted every tiny Welsh success, any minor English error, every favourable refereeing decision, visibly propelled the men in scarlet towards this victory. Wales have now beaten England in 1949, 1959, 1969, 1979, 1989, 1999, 2009 and 2019. And the decibel levels have probably risen every time. [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN SPORT” posts_category=”18″ posts_number=”12″ query_type=”popular” /] There are still seven months to go until the World Cup in Japan but the bedlam of Cardiff will still be ringing in English ears come September. The build-up to these clashes rarely differs . . . anecdotes about fans head-butting the England team coach, the ceremonial goat, the vast male voice choir belting out Delilah, that anthem to domestic violence. But once the hymns and arias were done, this was always going to be an intensely serious clash between two quality teams. And after an extraordinary record of scoring a try within three minutes in each of their previous five Tests, England could not muster their usual dream start. Wales targeted Kyle Sinckler’s hotheadedness on discipline as Eddie Jones hauled him off Daly was miles wide with a long-range penalty in only the third minute and, though Owen Farrell landed a kick from closer in, Wales fly-half Gareth Anscombe soon levelled, with Sinckler the guilty man. When England made the breakthrough, it came courtesy of nimble thinking from two of their big men. Courtney Lawes won possession in Artful Dodger fashion and Tom Curry pounced on a momentary lapse in concentration to breach the Welsh line and score his first Test try. The flanker had caused a proper scene against France when a gashed forehead left his face coated in claret. His mother had been in tears, fearing for her boy’s good looks. This time Mrs Curry would have been overcome by pride and joy. At least momentarily. England gave the home side a fierce examination in the first half, but Wales finished strongly Henry Slade runs with the ball in the open field in Cardiff England scented blood — Henry Slade stretched himself to charge down a kick, then Jonny May went into overdrive chasing his own grubber at tremendous pace before bundling Hadleigh Parkes into touch and celebrating with a double fist pump. But crucially the Red Rose could not add to their seven-point lead before half-time. Sinckler’s fuse reached its end during a spot of handbags as he pushed and wagged his finger at Alun Wyn Jones. As indiscipline infected the English ranks, Anscombe kicked two penalties with May and Sinckler the culprits. Jones withdrew Sinckler midway through the second half — just as Mystic Warren had been proved spectacularly correct. [bc_video video_id=”5982675967001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Huge brawl happens during rugby clash in Wales right next to anxious supporters “] When Farrell landed England’s solitary second-half points with a 63rd-minute penalty, the noise was so intense the ‘Respect the Kicker’ request on the big screen read like a sarcastic joke. It all hinged on an extraordinary spell of Welsh pressure lasting 35 phases and ending with Biggar — on for Anscombe — flinging a pass to Cory Hill, who powered through Billy Vunipola and inched over. After Adams had clinched it, Welsh skipper Jones screamed down a TV camera lens as an entire nation drowned in ecstasy. They were not shy about it, the Welsh, but then again they had no reason to be.
23 Feb 19
The Scottish Sun
FIRST the bones, then the eardrums, then the pride. The battering and bruising was thorough and relentless as England’s Grand Slam hopes were obliterated by a passionate Welsh onslaught — on and off the pitch. Josh Adams juggles the ball before collecting and touching down to raise the roof at the Principality Stadium Adams’ incredible try sent Cardiff into delirium “The world hasn’t ended, mate,” said Eddie Jones afterwards. But for a moment, it sounded like it had. That was when Josh Adams produced a massive leap to rob Elliot Daly, collect Dan Biggar’s kick and go over for the late try which confirmed the Dragons’ victory. The roar was so booming you expected to see a nuclear mushroom cloud in the sky. Gallons of ale were sprayed around the Principality Stadium in a display of joyous wastefulness. The brawn, then the local Brain’s beer. This was going to be the mother of all celebrations in the land of their fathers. A record 12th straight victory for the national team and, even more importantly, a bloody nose for the damned English. England strutted to emphatic victories over Ireland and France to mark themselves out as Six Nations favourites. But as soon as they were faced with a genuine challenge, Jones’ men lost their heads and wilted as they chucked away a 10-3 half-time lead. Cory Hill’s try swung the momentum in Wales’ favour Tom Curry dances through to score the first try of the game for England Wales coach Warren Gatland called it right when he singled out England’s Kyle Sinckler as an ‘emotional time bomb’ and a couple of moments of indiscipline from the Harlequins prop turned the tide. If Gatland does end up being interviewed as Jones’ successor as England boss after the World Cup, the New Zealander can add clairvoyance to his long list of attributes. As is customary on these occasions, Gatland cited English arrogance — real or imaginary — as a motivation. In truth, an England team which finished fifth in the Six Nations last year was never quite as good as has been suggested by those wins in Dublin and over the French at Twickenham. They also missed the might of the injured Mako Vunipola and Maro Itoje, not that there will be any Welsh sympathy for a nation with such vast resources. England were in command when Curry scored the opening try… but the second half was a different story Wales still need wins over Scotland and Ireland to beat England to the title and secure a Grand Slam. But with the key clash against the Irish here in Cardiff on March 16, you would not bet against them. Because, while Gatland’s players were exceptional, it is difficult to overestimate the impact of this Welsh crowd. Asked whether the atmosphere had made a difference, Jones replied: “It always does mate — that’s why you have home and away. “You have to be good enough to cope with it and we weren’t.” The roars which greeted every tiny Welsh success, any minor English error, every favourable refereeing decision, visibly propelled the men in scarlet towards this victory. Wales have now beaten England in 1949, 1959, 1969, 1979, 1989, 1999, 2009 and 2019. And the decibel levels have probably risen every time. [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN SPORT” posts_category=”4″ posts_number=”12″ query_type=”popular” /] There are still seven months to go until the World Cup in Japan but the bedlam of Cardiff will still be ringing in English ears come September. The build-up to these clashes rarely differs . . . anecdotes about fans head-butting the England team coach, the ceremonial goat, the vast male voice choir belting out Delilah, that anthem to domestic violence. But once the hymns and arias were done, this was always going to be an intensely serious clash between two quality teams. And after an extraordinary record of scoring a try within three minutes in each of their previous five Tests, England could not muster their usual dream start. Wales targeted Kyle Sinckler’s hotheadedness on discipline as Eddie Jones hauled him off Daly was miles wide with a long-range penalty in only the third minute and, though Owen Farrell landed a kick from closer in, Wales fly-half Gareth Anscombe soon levelled, with Sinckler the guilty man. When England made the breakthrough, it came courtesy of nimble thinking from two of their big men. Courtney Lawes won possession in Artful Dodger fashion and Tom Curry pounced on a momentary lapse in concentration to breach the Welsh line and score his first Test try. The flanker had caused a proper scene against France when a gashed forehead left his face coated in claret. His mother had been in tears, fearing for her boy’s good looks. This time Mrs Curry would have been overcome by pride and joy. At least momentarily. England gave the home side a fierce examination in the first half, but Wales finished strongly Henry Slade runs with the ball in the open field in Cardiff England scented blood — Henry Slade stretched himself to charge down a kick, then Jonny May went into overdrive chasing his own grubber at tremendous pace before bundling Hadleigh Parkes into touch and celebrating with a double fist pump. But crucially the Red Rose could not add to their seven-point lead before half-time. Sinckler’s fuse reached its end during a spot of handbags as he pushed and wagged his finger at Alun Wyn Jones. As indiscipline infected the English ranks, Anscombe kicked two penalties with May and Sinckler the culprits. Jones withdrew Sinckler midway through the second half — just as Mystic Warren had been proved spectacularly correct. [bc_video video_id=”5982675967001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Huge brawl happens during rugby clash in Wales right next to anxious supporters “] When Farrell landed England’s solitary second-half points with a 63rd-minute penalty, the noise was so intense the ‘Respect the Kicker’ request on the big screen read like a sarcastic joke. It all hinged on an extraordinary spell of Welsh pressure lasting 35 phases and ending with Biggar — on for Anscombe — flinging a pass to Cory Hill, who powered through Billy Vunipola and inched over. After Adams had clinched it, Welsh skipper Jones screamed down a TV camera lens as an entire nation drowned in ecstasy. They were not shy about it, the Welsh, but then again they had no reason to be.
23 Feb 19
The Sun
FIRST the bones, then the eardrums, then the pride. The battering and bruising was thorough and relentless as England’s Grand Slam hopes were obliterated by a passionate Welsh onslaught — on and off the pitch. Josh Adams juggles the ball before collecting and touching down to raise the roof at the Principality Stadium Adams’ incredible try sent Cardiff into delirium “The world hasn’t ended, mate,” said Eddie Jones afterwards. But for a moment, it sounded like it had. That was when Josh Adams produced a massive leap to rob Elliot Daly, collect Dan Biggar’s kick and go over for the late try which confirmed the Dragons’ victory. The roar was so booming you expected to see a nuclear mushroom cloud in the sky. Gallons of ale were sprayed around the Principality Stadium in a display of joyous wastefulness. The brawn, then the local Brain’s beer. This was going to be the mother of all celebrations in the land of their fathers. A record 12th straight victory for the national team and, even more importantly, a bloody nose for the damned English. England strutted to emphatic victories over Ireland and France to mark themselves out as Six Nations favourites. But as soon as they were faced with a genuine challenge, Jones’ men lost their heads and wilted as they chucked away a 10-3 half-time lead. Cory Hill’s try swung the momentum in Wales’ favour Tom Curry dances through to score the first try of the game for England Wales coach Warren Gatland called it right when he singled out England’s Kyle Sinckler as an ‘emotional time bomb’ and a couple of moments of indiscipline from the Harlequins prop turned the tide. If Gatland does end up being interviewed as Jones’ successor as England boss after the World Cup, the New Zealander can add clairvoyance to his long list of attributes. As is customary on these occasions, Gatland cited English arrogance — real or imaginary — as a motivation. In truth, an England team which finished fifth in the Six Nations last year was never quite as good as has been suggested by those wins in Dublin and over the French at Twickenham. They also missed the might of the injured Mako Vunipola and Maro Itoje, not that there will be any Welsh sympathy for a nation with such vast resources. England were in command when Curry scored the opening try… but the second half was a different story Wales still need wins over Scotland and Ireland to beat England to the title and secure a Grand Slam. But with the key clash against the Irish here in Cardiff on March 16, you would not bet against them. Because, while Gatland’s players were exceptional, it is difficult to overestimate the impact of this Welsh crowd. Asked whether the atmosphere had made a difference, Jones replied: “It always does mate — that’s why you have home and away. “You have to be good enough to cope with it and we weren’t.” The roars which greeted every tiny Welsh success, any minor English error, every favourable refereeing decision, visibly propelled the men in scarlet towards this victory. Wales have now beaten England in 1949, 1959, 1969, 1979, 1989, 1999, 2009 and 2019. And the decibel levels have probably risen every time. [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN SPORT” posts_category=”321″ posts_number=”12″ query_type=”popular” /] There are still seven months to go until the World Cup in Japan but the bedlam of Cardiff will still be ringing in English ears come September. The build-up to these clashes rarely differs . . . anecdotes about fans head-butting the England team coach, the ceremonial goat, the vast male voice choir belting out Delilah, that anthem to domestic violence. But once the hymns and arias were done, this was always going to be an intensely serious clash between two quality teams. And after an extraordinary record of scoring a try within three minutes in each of their previous five Tests, England could not muster their usual dream start. Wales targeted Kyle Sinckler’s hotheadedness on discipline as Eddie Jones hauled him off Daly was miles wide with a long-range penalty in only the third minute and, though Owen Farrell landed a kick from closer in, Wales fly-half Gareth Anscombe soon levelled, with Sinckler the guilty man. When England made the breakthrough, it came courtesy of nimble thinking from two of their big men. Courtney Lawes won possession in Artful Dodger fashion and Tom Curry pounced on a momentary lapse in concentration to breach the Welsh line and score his first Test try. The flanker had caused a proper scene against France when a gashed forehead left his face coated in claret. His mother had been in tears, fearing for her boy’s good looks. This time Mrs Curry would have been overcome by pride and joy. At least momentarily. England gave the home side a fierce examination in the first half, but Wales finished strongly Henry Slade runs with the ball in the open field in Cardiff England scented blood — Henry Slade stretched himself to charge down a kick, then Jonny May went into overdrive chasing his own grubber at tremendous pace before bundling Hadleigh Parkes into touch and celebrating with a double fist pump. But crucially the Red Rose could not add to their seven-point lead before half-time. Sinckler’s fuse reached its end during a spot of handbags as he pushed and wagged his finger at Alun Wyn Jones. As indiscipline infected the English ranks, Anscombe kicked two penalties with May and Sinckler the culprits. Jones withdrew Sinckler midway through the second half — just as Mystic Warren had been proved spectacularly correct. [bc_video video_id=”5982675967001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Huge brawl happens during rugby clash in Wales right next to anxious supporters “] When Farrell landed England’s solitary second-half points with a 63rd-minute penalty, the noise was so intense the ‘Respect the Kicker’ request on the big screen read like a sarcastic joke. It all hinged on an extraordinary spell of Welsh pressure lasting 35 phases and ending with Biggar — on for Anscombe — flinging a pass to Cory Hill, who powered through Billy Vunipola and inched over. After Adams had clinched it, Welsh skipper Jones screamed down a TV camera lens as an entire nation drowned in ecstasy. They were not shy about it, the Welsh, but then again they had no reason to be.
23 Feb 19
In The Know Cycling

Throwing back to a Royal Robbins original, the Royal Robbins Backcountry Billy Goat Canvas shorts are ultra-durable with useful pockets and a vintage, lived-in look and feel.

23 Feb 19
Get Honey & Salt

Ye Ha! You've just shepherded yer own Blow Up Billy Goat! Any time you are in the mood for a roll in the hay, she'll be your shear delight. Sometimes it feels so good being so ba-a-a-d!

23 Feb 19
Archy Worldys

TThe toll booths were removed from the Severn Bridge two months ago, but the English rugby teams in Cardiff are granted a free ride. It explains why the Six Nations retain their passion and brilliance to withstand social change and changing political sand in the UK. The desire to make England pay for the perceived […]

23 Feb 19
The Adventures of Matt and Emma

While I know this title may not make sense straight away… bear with me. It should all make sense by the end of this blog post. Also, as a disclaimer, no sheep were hurt in the making of this post 😉 Our trip to Ireland finally happened. For those who don’t remember me saying this […]

22 Feb 19
More UK News

Wales v England: Watch some of the greatest moments Six Nations: Wales v England Venue: Principality Stadium, Cardiff Date: Saturday, 23 February Kick-off: 16:45 GMT Coverage: Live on BBC One, S4C, BBC Radio 5 live, BBC Radio Wales, BBC Radio Cymru & BBC Sport website and BBC Sport app, plus live text commentary. You can […]

22 Feb 19
Alexandra Michelle Photography Blog

Sometimes I get so wrapped up in moving forward and the numbers game, comparing myself to this person or that person that I forget about what it felt like to be a dreamer. Back when I started this journey I never intended to have people pay me to take their pictures.  I was a young […]

22 Feb 19
FRACTURED AIR

We are delighted to welcome back the legendary duo Xylouris White for a Cork show on Friday 5th April 2019. All details are below. Fractured Air & Dali Live present: Xylouris White & special guests Friday 5th April Doors 8PM (EARLY SHOW) Dali Careys Lane, Cork TICKETS: https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/fractured-air-dali-present-xylouris-white-and-special-guests-tickets-57166586800 Xylouris White (Jim White and George Xylouris) […]