Biondini

12 Apr 19
Archy Worldys

Halifax has been criticized for a rebrand concept that has more than a passing resemblance to its competitors. The bank has commissioned the Rufus Leonard agency to redesign its mobile app, but one of the early drafts showed a photo of a bank card with identification numbers of Monzo, the UK-based mobile-only bank. Somehow, Monzo […]

12 Apr 19
Noticias Ultimas

Halifax ha sido criticado por un concepto de cambio de marca que tiene más que una semejanza pasajera con sus rivales. El banco contrató a la agencia Rufus Leonard para rediseñar su aplicación móvil, pero uno de los primeros giros mostró una foto de una tarjeta bancaria con números de identificación pertenecientes a Monzo, el […]

12 Apr 19
Nachrichten Welt

Halifax wurde für ein Rebrand-Konzept kritisiert, das mehr als eine vorübergehende Ähnlichkeit mit seinen Konkurrenten hat. Die Bank hat die Agentur Rufus Leonard mit der Neugestaltung ihrer mobilen App beauftragt, aber einer der frühen Entwürfe zeigte ein Foto einer Bankkarte mit Identifizierungsnummern der Monzo, der in Großbritannien ansässigen Mobile-Only-Bank. Irgendwie sah es Monzo-Chef Tom Blomfield, […]

12 Apr 19
News Archives Uk

Halifax has been criticized for a rebrand concept that has more than a passing resemblance to its competitors. The bank has commissioned the Rufus Leonard agency to redesign its mobile app, but one of the early drafts showed a photo of a bank card with identification numbers of Monzo, the UK-based mobile-only bank. Somehow, Monzo […]

04 Apr 19
Steven Salgado | Official Website

Last March 16th Steven Salgado was one of the guest of books presentation of “Avatares a book written by the poet Susana Biondini at Miami Dade College, Miami Florida.

13 Mar 19
when writings comes to life

Trip to Vancouver Art Gallery   on March 8th, 2019 our communications 12 class visited the Vancouver Art Gallery, the fifth largest art gallery in Canada and the largest in western Canada, I enjoyed looking at the different kinds of arts. We traveled in two groups by the SkyTrain authorised by two lovely teachers: Tara Renaud […]

09 Mar 19
la Ringhiera

Fede, arte, cultura, pensiero, storia e tradizione. Presentato stamani il Mysterium Festival 2019, nell’Arcivescovado di Taranto, alla presenza dell’Arcivescovo Metropolita di Taranto Monsignor Filippo Santoro, del portavoce dell’Arcivescovo di Taranto don Emanuele Ferro, dell’assessore alla cultura Fabiano Marti, del direttore artistico del Mysterium  Piero Romano, del presidente Donato Fusillo e di Adriana Chirico del comitato scientifico. […]

20 Feb 19
Redwood Times
The offshore wind industry could support almost 18,000 new jobs in California, according to a new report. The sector is projected to grow as the cost of production falls overtime with generation efficiency estimates “two to three times that of solar, nearly twice that of land-based wind, and even greater than that of coal.” The report, which focuses on the potential economic impact offshore wind could have on California’s economy, was put together by the American Jobs Project along with several other partners including Humboldt State University’s Schatz Energy Research Center. The initial phases of offshore wind development are in motion, with two projects proposed off California’s coast, the report stated. One of the projects, led by the Redwood Community Energy Authority, is eyeing an area off Humboldt County’s coast. “It’s an exciting thing that could be a really great for our harbor and the immediate area,” said Lori Biondini, director of business planning and finance at RCEA. “There are a lot of possibilities … we’re definitely focused on maximizing that.” Biondini said it’s a bit early to really understand the impacts offshore wind might hold, which underscores the value of studies that explore the industry’s potential. “Lot of things need to be worked out,” she said.  “There are a lot of examples as to how it could play out.” The report is just the beginning, according to Mary Collins, managing director of the American Jobs Project and lead author of the report. “It’s really the kindling to ignite a broader conversation,” she said. “It’s up to us as Californians on the local level and on the state level to start having a conversation about what we want this industry to look like.” Offshore wind has the power to provide California with 1.5 times the amount of electricity the state currently uses, the report states, with projected annual growth of 25 percent until 2022. The industry holds the potential to help the state make leaps and bounds towards meeting its goal of 100 percent clean energy by 2045, Collins said, but doing so will require a unified vision if Californians hope to see a full return from the potential of offshore wind. According to the report, if fully utilized, California’s “offshore generation potential could exceed New York and New Jersey,” which have already made “significant investment in the technology.” Jason Busch, executive director of the Pacific Ocean Energy Trust, one of the partners in the study, emphasized the importance of a focused vision, particularly when it comes to something as complex as the offshore wind industry. “Engagement early and often is not just a mantra, it’s a necessity,” he said. “We hope California’s government and its leadership will recognize and seriously consider what this opportunity is for California.” The industry would create a massive new sector for California, Busch said, which could include several “supply chain activities,” including manufacturing, installation, operation, maintenance, service and decommissioning. Moving forward, the study goes on to suggest five policy recommendations including a phased approach to offshore wind workforce development, infrastructure upgrades and the appointment of a “California Offshore Wind Czar” to “create and lead a vision for growth that aligns with the values of Californians and to serve as the primary point of contact for California’s strategic offshore wind efforts.” “We’re not talking about the extractive industries of yesteryear,” Busch said.  “We’re talking about a modern, independent operation in the clean energy sector.” Humboldt Bay Harbor District executive director Larry Oetker said an offshore wind project like the one in development with RCEA could mean big changes for the area. “It’s one of the most exciting projects that we have seen come to Humboldt Bay in years … probably since the 60s or 70s,” he said. “It has the opportunity to completely transform the port of Humboldt and to bring national, state and international investment in for clean high-paying jobs that are really in the forefront of the green energy field.” The state has deep coastal waters with some of the highest wind speeds in the country, the report states. But the winds off of Humboldt County’s coast have been described by many as world class, and Oetker believes Humboldt’s port is uniquely situated to foot what he hopes will be a booming industry. “There are no obstructions over the entrance of Humboldt Bay,” he said, noting that not even the Golden Gate Bridge is tall enough to pass a wind turbine under. “If you go to all the ports up and down the West Coast, they all have bridges or obstructions with the exception of Humboldt Bay … and we also have land for this type of activity.” Oetker said the harbor district is working with the local community to begin preparations to host the offshore wind industry, including the development of a multi-purpose dock. If it doesn’t happen here, Oetker said, it’ll happen somewhere else, so the region should prepare either way. “This is exactly the type of business Humboldt County should embrace and encourage,” he said. “The harbor district will be working on this project diligently.” Mark Severy, who works with the Schatz Energy Research Center, said they primarily provided technical assistance with the report. In an email to the Times-Standard, Severy said SERC “is beginning work on a feasibility analysis of offshore wind in Northern California,” which will be a year-long project commencing in the spring. “We are studying many of the issues surrounding offshore wind development in Northern California, which includes the environmental impacts, port infrastructure modifications, stakeholder benefits and concerns, and current policy constraints and recommendations,” he said. “It’s important that we look at all the surrounding issues and consider various stakeholder viewpoints in order to provide policymakers and developers accurate information about the benefits and concerns of offshore wind development in our region.” Philip Santos can be reached at 707-441-0506.
20 Feb 19
Times-Standard
The offshore wind industry could support almost 18,000 new jobs in California, according to a new report. The sector is projected to grow as the cost of production falls overtime with generation efficiency estimates “two to three times that of solar, nearly twice that of land-based wind, and even greater than that of coal.” The report, which focuses on the potential economic impact offshore wind could have on California’s economy, was put together by the American Jobs Project along with several other partners including Humboldt State University’s Schatz Energy Research Center. The initial phases of offshore wind development are in motion, with two projects proposed off California’s coast, the report stated. One of the projects, led by the Redwood Community Energy Authority, is eyeing an area off Humboldt County’s coast. “It’s an exciting thing that could be a really great for our harbor and the immediate area,” said Lori Biondini, director of business planning and finance at RCEA. “There are a lot of possibilities … we’re definitely focused on maximizing that.” Biondini said it’s a bit early to really understand the impacts offshore wind might hold, which underscores the value of studies that explore the industry’s potential. “Lot of things need to be worked out,” she said.  “There are a lot of examples as to how it could play out.” The report is just the beginning, according to Mary Collins, managing director of the American Jobs Project and lead author of the report. “It’s really the kindling to ignite a broader conversation,” she said. “It’s up to us as Californians on the local level and on the state level to start having a conversation about what we want this industry to look like.” Offshore wind has the power to provide California with 1.5 times the amount of electricity the state currently uses, the report states, with projected annual growth of 25 percent until 2022. The industry holds the potential to help the state make leaps and bounds towards meeting its goal of 100 percent clean energy by 2045, Collins said, but doing so will require a unified vision if Californians hope to see a full return from the potential of offshore wind. According to the report, if fully utilized, California’s “offshore generation potential could exceed New York and New Jersey,” which have already made “significant investment in the technology.” Jason Busch, executive director of the Pacific Ocean Energy Trust, one of the partners in the study, emphasized the importance of a focused vision, particularly when it comes to something as complex as the offshore wind industry. “Engagement early and often is not just a mantra, it’s a necessity,” he said. “We hope California’s government and its leadership will recognize and seriously consider what this opportunity is for California.” The industry would create a massive new sector for California, Busch said, which could include several “supply chain activities,” including manufacturing, installation, operation, maintenance, service and decommissioning. Moving forward, the study goes on to suggest five policy recommendations including a phased approach to offshore wind workforce development, infrastructure upgrades and the appointment of a “California Offshore Wind Czar” to “create and lead a vision for growth that aligns with the values of Californians and to serve as the primary point of contact for California’s strategic offshore wind efforts.” “We’re not talking about the extractive industries of yesteryear,” Busch said.  “We’re talking about a modern, independent operation in the clean energy sector.” Humboldt Bay Harbor District executive director Larry Oetker said an offshore wind project like the one in development with RCEA could mean big changes for the area. “It’s one of the most exciting projects that we have seen come to Humboldt Bay in years … probably since the 60s or 70s,” he said. “It has the opportunity to completely transform the port of Humboldt and to bring national, state and international investment in for clean high-paying jobs that are really in the forefront of the green energy field.” The state has deep coastal waters with some of the highest wind speeds in the country, the report states. But the winds off of Humboldt County’s coast have been described by many as world class, and Oetker believes Humboldt’s port is uniquely situated to foot what he hopes will be a booming industry. “There are no obstructions over the entrance of Humboldt Bay,” he said, noting that not even the Golden Gate Bridge is tall enough to pass a wind turbine under. “If you go to all the ports up and down the West Coast, they all have bridges or obstructions with the exception of Humboldt Bay … and we also have land for this type of activity.” Oetker said the harbor district is working with the local community to begin preparations to host the offshore wind industry, including the development of a multi-purpose dock. If it doesn’t happen here, Oetker said, it’ll happen somewhere else, so the region should prepare either way. “This is exactly the type of business Humboldt County should embrace and encourage,” he said. “The harbor district will be working on this project diligently.” Mark Severy, who works with the Schatz Energy Research Center, said they primarily provided technical assistance with the report. In an email to the Times-Standard, Severy said SERC “is beginning work on a feasibility analysis of offshore wind in Northern California,” which will be a year-long project commencing in the spring. “We are studying many of the issues surrounding offshore wind development in Northern California, which includes the environmental impacts, port infrastructure modifications, stakeholder benefits and concerns, and current policy constraints and recommendations,” he said. “It’s important that we look at all the surrounding issues and consider various stakeholder viewpoints in order to provide policymakers and developers accurate information about the benefits and concerns of offshore wind development in our region.” Philip Santos can be reached at 707-441-0506.
10 Feb 19
STUFA A PELLET

CREAZIONE SITI WEB IN 24 ORE  Come creare negozio online 09 gen 2019 2018 Televisione I NOSTRI FIGLI 06 dic 2018 Testimonial ELENA MIRO’ A/I 2018-2019 17 set 2018 Televisione NON DIRLO AL MIO CAPO 2 13 set 2018 Testimonial 22 lug 2018 Televisione WIND MUSIC AWARDS 2018 05 giu 2018 Televisione IL CAPITANO MARIA […]

10 Feb 19
STUFA A PELLET

CREAZIONE SITI WEB IN 24 ORE  Aprire negozio online 09 gen 2019 2018 Televisione I NOSTRI FIGLI 06 dic 2018 Testimonial ELENA MIRO’ A/I 2018-2019 17 set 2018 Televisione NON DIRLO AL MIO CAPO 2 13 set 2018 Testimonial 22 lug 2018 Televisione WIND MUSIC AWARDS 2018 05 giu 2018 Televisione IL CAPITANO MARIA 07 […]

10 Feb 19
STUFA A PELLET

CREAZIONE SITI WEB IN 24 ORE  Aprire un negozio online 09 gen 2019 2018 Televisione I NOSTRI FIGLI 06 dic 2018 Testimonial ELENA MIRO’ A/I 2018-2019 17 set 2018 Televisione NON DIRLO AL MIO CAPO 2 13 set 2018 Testimonial 22 lug 2018 Televisione WIND MUSIC AWARDS 2018 05 giu 2018 Televisione IL CAPITANO MARIA […]

05 Feb 19
Times-Herald
A hundred things can go potentially go through an athlete’s mind in the final seconds of a close game.  That being said, St. Patrick-St. Vincent High senior girls basketball player Ashmeen Sran was only focusing on one when she got the ball in the key against John Swett — use the glass. Sran didn’t call out the word “bank”, but her layup shot was money as it went in to give the Bruins a thrilling, come-from-behind 54-53 victory over the Warriors. “I remember Coach (Nadine) Walker telling us before the game to always hit the backboard,” Sran said. “I knew that even if I missed the shot I would still be able to say I did what she told me to do if I hit the backboard. Usually in that situation I might go up for a floater, but then I remembered what she said and I told myself, ‘Well, let’s try something new.'” Walker laughed when being told the story of Sran’s main focus during the game-winning shot. “I had put it on the blackboard before the game, not just for her but the entire team,” Walker said. “I told the team that their adrenaline was going to be very high for a game like this, and when that happens you tend to shoot the ball too hard. So after the game she comes up to me and starts shouting, ‘Walker, Walker! I did it! I did it!’ I thought that was funny, but hey, it worked.” Sran, who scored 15 points in the win against Swett, added another 18 two nights later in a home win against El Cerrito. She is the Times-Herald’s Athlete of the Week. Sran’s basket capped off a comeback in a game that had the Bruins trailing by 11 at the half and 3 points with 23 seconds to go. With no timeouts left, St. Pat’s guard Tameiya Sadler quickly drove the lane for a layup to cut the Warriors lead to a point. St. Pat’s still needed a steal, however, and the Bruins got it when Kayla Revelo intercepted a John Swett pass near halfcourt. She then fed Sran for the winning score. “I thought the overall team communication on those final plays is what won us the game,” Sran said. “After Tameiya scored, we still needed to trap on defense and go for the ball. I originally was going to go for the ball, but then I saw Kayla was closer and she was going to get it. So immediately I figured I might as well cut away and go toward the basket. Olivia (Bacal Walker) was also there and open, but I thought maybe I had a better angle so that’s why I called for the ball.” Nadine Walker said she has now watched the final play a few times on video and began to notice one thing — the volume. “How quiet it was when the ball went up in the air,” the St. Pat’s coach said. “It was so crazy in our gym and loud all game, and then we got the steal and it got louder. But when Ashmeen’s shot goes in the air the crowd turns so quiet for a second. Absolute silence. I mean if that shot doesn’t go in, all the air in the gym would have been released at the same time. There’s a lot of pressure on that shot. It’s not as if you miss and the game still goes to overtime. You have to make it there.” Sran scored, but she wasn’t celebrating quite yet. “We’ve been in situations like this before, so I’ve been trained to immediately go to play defense,” Sran said. “I was looking to go up and guard the nearest player so they didn’t get an opportunity to score.” Nadine Walker said that mentality is one of the areas Sran has improved in over the years more than anything. “She brings a quality where she never stops going,” the Bruins’ coach said. “If there are still seconds on the clock, she’s hustling. She’s helping out on defense or trying to get rebounds. She’s really expanded her game.” Sran also helped show some leadership abilities at the half when St. Pat’s trailed by double digits. “The good thing about this team is that we have so many seniors that are willing to speak,” Sran said. “I remember telling the rest of the team at the half, ‘Heh, remember how we felt when we lost to Swett last time? Let’s not feel like that again.’ We knew that we were a good enough team to beat them.” Sran currently is averaging 11.1 points, three rebounds, 1.8 steals and 1.7 assists per game. However, the day after the win against Swett she was still in amazement. “I woke up the next morning asking myself, ‘Did that happen? Did I make that?'” Sran said, with a laugh. Honorable mention Deyari Babb, Vallejo girls basketball. Babb had 17 rebounds, 10 points and seven blocks in a win over Richmond on Friday. William Biondini, American Canyon boys soccer. Biondini scored two goals in a  win over Napa on Tuesday. Micaella Carpio-Little, Bethel girls basketball. Carpio-Little scored 14 points and grabbed 12 rebounds in a win over De Anza on Wednesday. Akil Edwards, St. Pat’s boys basketball. Edwards scored a program-high 41 points in a win over Vallejo on Saturday and added 37 points earlier in the week in a loss to De Anza. Riley Madayag, St. Pat’s girls basketball. Madayag scored 20 points in a win over El Cerrito and added 10 points in a win over John Swett. Chance McMillian, Bethel High boys basketball. McMillian scored 40 points in a win over Kennedy on Saturday. He also had 38 points against Richmond earlier in the week. Gabe Patrick, American Canyon boys basketball. Patrick scored 19 points in a win over Sonoma Valley on Saturday. Toyota Vallejo Athlete of the Week Name: Ashmeen Sran Sport: Girls Basketball School: St. Pat’s Year: Senior Achievements: Hit game-winning basket in the final seconds against John Swett and scored 18 points in a win over El Cerrito.
30 Jan 19
Times-Herald
The American Canyon boys soccer team defeated Napa 3-2 on Tuesday night. William Biondini scored two goals and Jose Lopez scored one in the win for the Wolves (9-8-4, 5-5-2 in the Vine Valley Athletic League). American Canyon’s next game is Thursday at home against Sonoma Valley.
29 Jan 19
Cotati Accordion Festival

Pietro Adragna.was born in Erice (TP), Italy in 1988.  He started studying the accordion at six years of age, showing excellent promise early on. In the years that followed Adragna, as well as studying the accordion, took up the piano at the Conservatorio di Musica di Stato “A. Scontrino” in Trapani under the guidance of […]