Brooklyn Nine Nine Season 6 Episode One Review

19 Jan 19
But Why Tho?

“Brooklyn Nine-Nine” is back this week with a new episode. Check out one of our contributor’s review of season 6, episode 2 of NBC’s new hit show.

18 Jan 19
Keithlovesmovies

For our review of the last episode of Brooklyn Nine-Nine, click here.

17 Jan 19
Ed B on Sports

Kerry Butler From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Kerry Butler Kerry Butler performing at the Epcot International Festival of the Arts on February 6, 2017 Born Kerry Marie Butler (1971-06-18) June 18, 1971 (age 47)[1] New York City, U.S. Alma mater Ithaca College Occupation Actress Spouse(s) Joey Mazzarino (m. 1991) [2] Children 2 Website http://www.kerrybutler.net Kerry Marie Butler (born […]

16 Jan 19
IndieWire
“Deadly Class” starts with a teacher whipping his cane into the face of a young girl. Surprised, but silent, tears rolling down her face, the teenage student stares at the blood pouring from her nose, as the rest of the class reacts in peculiar fashion. Marcus (Benjamin Wadsworth), the audience’s stand-in, is stunned. He gasps and stares in stupefied horror while his indifferent teacher continues the lesson, as if he didn’t just physically assault a student. But the rest of the class doesn’t flinch. They sit and listen more dutifully than if Master Lin (Benedict Wong) had taken away her cell phone. A boy in the front row casually looks over his shoulder for an uncaring glance at the aftermath. Someone even laughs. Responses to the new Syfy series will probably be similar. Some viewers may feel like they just got slapped in the face by Rick Remender and Miles Orion Feldsott’s adaptation of the former’s graphic novel. Others will shrug and continue bingeing, hoping for an episode that pulls all the big ideas together. Maybe one out of every 10 will laugh at the blacker-than-black humor, but “Deadly Class” never coalesces into a coherent message around all the shock and awe. It’s a nasty experience. [pmc-related-link href=”https://www.indiewire.com/2019/01/brooklyn-99-season-6-review-spoilers-1202034250/” type=”Read More:” target=”_blank”]‘Brooklyn Nine-Nine’ Review: In Season 6, ‘The Nine-Nine’ Matters More than Ever[/pmc-related-link] Our sweaty, narrating hero is Marcus, a homeless teenager trying to evade capture for a slew of murders he didn’t commit. But it’s not just the cops who want him. Marcus is recruited by Kings Dominion, an elite private academy where criminals’ kids are sent to learn the ruthless ways of their parents’ businesses. Populated by the offspring of every baddie imaginable — from L.A. gang disciples and cartel kiddos, to Yakuzas in training and Nazi progeny — the school has a few rules (like, “Don’t kill the other kids”) but assignments are aptly, ahem, deadly. Benjamin Wadsworth in “Deadly Class” Marcus knows he’s not a killer, even though they think he’s one of the best, so he tries to seek out like-minded friends for protection. Still, plopped down among the skater punks and goth introverts of its ’80s backdrop, it’s hard to tell who’s really bad and who’s only bad enough to fake it. Maybe he should write off Maria (Maria Gabriela de Faria), the Nazi chick who keeps hitting on him — even though her boyfriend is the son of a drug lord — but, you know, Marcus likes her. He also likes Saya (Lana Condor), who enjoys slicing people up with a katana as much as she’s hooked on stringing Marcus along. [pmc-related-link href=”https://www.indiewire.com/2019/01/black-monday-review-showtime-stock-regina-hall-1202034711/” type=”Read More:” target=”_blank”]‘Black Monday’ Review: Regina Hall Makes Showtime’s ‘Wolf of Wall Street’ Wannabe Worth the Risk[/pmc-related-link] He finds a few more trustworthy confidants among his fellow boys, but the school is a de facto torture chamber. Kids are poisoned during classes on studying poisons. Detention comes with two masked men hunting you down for sport. Mouse traps that cut to the bone are pranks. The environment excessively captures the painful experience of adolescence, especially when framed through the modern view of Reaganomics and the period-appropriate Cold War anxiety, but the first four hours are merciless and uncomfortable. You’ll be begging for a recess that never comes. Marcus and his few friends aren’t empathetic heroes stuck in a bad place. They’re oversimplified caricatures of prototypical teens offering viewers zero reasons to get attached and little insight in exchange for their bleak, flawed views on how to balance world power. Getting back to that opening — you know, where the girl gets stricken bloody by her teacher — the point of Master Lin’s lesson comes down to one line: “Character is revealed through choice.” He asks the class if they could get away with murdering someone, who would it be? Whoever they pick exposes who they really are, in that it reveals their deepest, darkest motives. It’s a dark question emphasized by the young woman’s gut-churning reaction to being beaten: She turns to Marcus and smiles, licking the blood from her lips. Benedict Wong in “Deadly Class” Of course, the proper answer — according to any of Chidi’s moral philosophy role models — is no one. You wouldn’t kill anyone, and “Deadly Class” might be taking a circuitous route to that point, but the majority of this road trip is spent illustrating a nasty metaphor about just how hard the world is on kids. Or, it’s really obsessed with hurting teens. Or maybe it’s just confused. The series repeatedly asks its audience to rationalize murder. It weighs the value of human life in summary judgments doled out by anyone willing to act. Episodes reframe those decisions, but without definitive emphasis. At best, it’s a murky portrait of extreme ideas. At worst, it’s irresponsible. Odds are high it’s all of the above, but even if you settle on one interpretation of Syfy’s series, there’s no fun to be had here. The first four episodes are cloaked in darkness, blood, poison, vomit, sexual innuendos, a lot of very bad people, and people who are meant to be good but must pretend to be bad to fit in. High school may have felt like a never-ending hellscape to many, but “Deadly Class” gives little motivation to watch by making onlookers experience the unpleasantness all over again. Grade: D+ “Deadly Class” premieres Wednesday, January 16 at 10 p.m. ET on Syfy.
14 Jan 19
IndieWire
Outdated and overextended aren’t desirable qualities for stocks or TV shows, but “Black Monday” makes them work to its advantage — for now. Showtime’s new comedy follows a greedy, drug-addicted, morally bankrupt but monetarily flush stock trader whose dangerous play for one company may have caused the worst stock market crash in the history of Wall Street. Despite saying as much right off the bat, David Caspe and Jordan Cahan ask you to root for Don Cheadle’s Maurice “Mo” Monroe anyway, marking yet another TV series mistakenly built on an antihero story (so very out of fashion in 2019) and told at such a rapid rate one wonders how “Black Monday” will sustain interest beyond its first episodes. But oh what fun lies within these initial 90 minutes. There’s Don Cheadle’s coked-up charm and a robot butler named Kyle; there’s a “Marry Me” reunion with Ken Marino playing identical twin Lehman brothers and Casey Wilson as a spoiled rich kid who’s as quick to slap her would-be hubby as she is to crush his reproductive parts; there’s ’80s jumpsuits, baggy suits, white suits, and track suits; there’s a bright red Lamborghini limousine — a lambo limo, a limbo —  with a recurring role; there’s a murder-mystery to unravel, and an acknowledgement of “Top Gun’s” homoerotic overtones by people who just saw “Top Gun” in theaters. And towering above it all is Regina Hall, ready and waiting for the solo spotlight she deserves, but making the most of one more supporting gig. [pmc-related-link href=”https://www.indiewire.com/2019/01/brooklyn-99-season-6-review-spoilers-1202034250/” type=”Read More:” target=”_blank”]‘Brooklyn Nine-Nine’ Review: In Season 6, ‘The Nine-Nine’ Matters More than Ever[/pmc-related-link] The “everything and the kitchen sink” approach taken by Caspe and Cahan pays dividends up front: Their episodes race by with loads of joyful enthusiasm, even as they’re laced with doomed morose. “Black Monday” is named after and framed around the historic day of trading that sent stock brokers throwing themselves off buildings, and one such suicide is shown in the first scene when someone wearing a familiar gold watch and green tie pin crash lands on the beloved red limbo. Who is it? Is it Moe? Is it his wunderkind protege, Blair Pfaff (Andrew Rannels)? Is it Moe’s top trader and ex-girlfriend Dawn (Regina Hall)? Is it one of his lackeys, enemies, or a yet-to-be-made connection? Don Cheadle in “Black Monday” From there, the story backtracks one year, recounting the events leading up to that fateful day and titling the episodes after how many days are left. (Episode 1 is “365,” Episode 2 is “364,” and Episode 3, lest you worry it’ll take 36 seasons to get to Black Monday, jumps ahead to “339.”) Each entry tracks the day-to-day activities of The Jammer Group, a bunch of party-loving traders led by Monroe who are trying to make a name for themselves on Wall Street. While their “Wolf of Wall Street” antics are entertaining and captured with an aptly furious influx, the flaw lies in their leader. Moe defines himself by two things: money and cocaine. Even though he asks for pity through his ailing love life, all signs point to his loneliness being self-inflicted, and the rest of his cruel, careless ‘nannigans will likely soon prove meaner than they are funny. [pmc-related-link href=”https://www.indiewire.com/2019/01/youre-the-worst-review-season-5-ending-1202033567/” type=”Read More:” target=”_blank”]‘You’re the Worst’ Review: Season 5 Is Just a Show, Standing in Front of Its Viewers, Demanding to Be Acknowledged[/pmc-related-link] Still, he’s balanced out by a naively good-hearted new kid (Rannels), who’s sharp in his comic timing but a little familiar as a character, and even more so by Dawn, whose only flaw is an inexplicable attachment to Moe. She’s the best trader on the block; her hair is so high and bouncy she could lease it as a bouncy house for kids’ parties on the weekend; her fashion is as on point as one could hope for during the ostentatious ’80s, and she’s as quick with an insult as she is supportive of hearing a great one. In short, she’s got a clear goal — conquer the men’s world of Wall Street — and a whole lot of character. Why isn’t she leading the series? There’s no good answer for that, but things could easily shift in her direction if Moe is the one who jumps off the building. “Black Monday” is overflowing with big, bold choices, daring you to be bored and winning that bet 90 percent of the time. (The pilot is even directed by Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg, adding behind-the-scenes opulence to the onscreen banquet of excess.) But it’s also awash in red flags for a burgeoning series, as the lead character is a questionable, outdated pick and the premise begs for a quick resolution to the mystery being teased. But viewers could do a lot worse than invest in this likely crash — plus, Caspe already has one iconic, shoulda-been-a-bust series under his belt. Maybe he can add one more. Grade: B- “Black Monday” premieres Sunday, January 20 at 10 p.m. ET on Showtime.
14 Jan 19
But Why Tho?

‘Brooklyn Nine-Nine’ is back with it’s sixth season premiere, now on NBC but with all the comedic charm we’ve fallen in love with.

12 Jan 19
Her Secluded Thoughts

Here is the list of all the drama series I’ve watched all throughout the year 2019. Enjoy! 1. Hello My Twenties (2016) Genre: Korean Series, Comedy, Drama Total Episodes: S01: 12 Review: I loved this series so much. It is a slice of life and very relatable especially for all the freshmen like me. This […]

11 Jan 19
The Average Viewer

The Nine-Nine is back! Jake and Amy go on a honeymoon, while the others deal with issues. A

11 Jan 19
Archy news nety

This review contains spoilers. 6.1 Honeymoon 2018 was The Worst for several reasons. Somewhere in the middle of the list, between Disney dismissed James Gunn based on bad faith, fake outrage and just plain Logan Paul, Brooklyn Nine-Nine deleted by Fox helped make the damned feel unnatural. But demonstrating that not everything is terrible all […]

11 Jan 19
News Archives Uk

Brooklyn Nine-Nine has been returned to television screens in the US and has been published. The overall consensus seems to have changed from FOX to NBC, but has not changed. USA Today says there's still the same "heart and humor" that made the show so beloved by fans, noting that the season's six premiere picks […]

11 Jan 19
Entertaining WE

If you’ve been trying to keep your cool, cool, cool during the insufferable wait for new episodes of Brooklyn Nine-Nine since news of its cancellation-turned-revival, there’s finally some good news on the docket: Your wait is officially over. Brooklyn Nine-Nine returns tonight, Jan. 10, at 9 p.m. ET on NBC, kicking off its sixth season and…

11 Jan 19
IndieWire
“Brooklyn Nine-Nine” picks up right where it left off — as if nothing happened between the time Season 5 ended and Season 6 began. The premiere features no self-knowing nod to the audience or meta jab at the show’s former network. The story just continues, and that’s how it should be. There are a million reasons why. For one, NBC was motivated to revive the comedy because it’s produced by parent company NBC Universal, and in the upcoming content wars, ownership is the whole ballgame. NBC wants future fans to be able to watch all of “Brooklyn 99,” uninterrupted, without subscribing to a different streaming service. Jake Peralta (Andy Samberg) doesn’t make a snide remark to Boyle (Joe Lo Truglio) about the show’s history because that’s not the “Nine-Nine” way. Its a sincere show filled with kind characters. They’re not about to mock the folks who gave them five great seasons, especially when the new episodes have zero time for distractions. [pmc-related-link href=”https://www.indiewire.com/2018/08/brooklyn-99-season-6-me-too-terry-crews-1201992361/” type=”Read More:” target=”_blank”]‘Brooklyn Nine-Nine’ Working on #MeToo Episode for Season 6, While Terry Crews Says the Movement Is ‘Just Beginning’[/pmc-related-link] And the first two NBC entries are medal-worthy performers. “Honeymoon” tracks Amy (Melissa Fumero) and Jake as they use their wedding insurance money to live large at a Mexican resort. Episode 2, “Hitchcock & Scully,” shines an insightful light on two of the show’s veteran reserves. For anyone worried about the show changing tacts for its new bosses, fear not — it’s still the same show and still great. But all that time worrying does provide a fresh opportunity to appreciate what makes the show tick, and why it resonates so strongly six seasons later. In short, producer and showrunner Dan Goor makes every second count. As for how, well, that requires some spoilers. [Editor’s Note: The following portion of the review contains spoilers for “Brooklyn 99” Season 6, Episode 1, “Honeymoon.”] The “Brooklyn Nine-Nine” premiere continues undisturbed, quickly delivering a long-awaited answer that, for a turbulent 24 hours, fans thought they may never hear: Did Captain Holt (Andre Braughter) get the commissioner job? Yes, he did — or so he thinks. After reading his email too fast, Holt misses the word “not” in his would-be congratulatory letter. His mistake provides Jake enough time to grab a boombox for a celebratory Jock Jams session, which creates the perfect cold open close as his oblivious exuberance runs contrary to the group’s despondent new tone. Andy Samberg and Andre Braugher in “Brooklyn Nine-Nine” Holt’s loss is a big choice, and one that will define the season overall, but it also sets up “Honeymoon’s” A-plot. All set to go coco-nuts around the clock, Jake and Amy’s romantic shenanigans are dampened by the surprise presence of Captain Holt at the same resort. (Gina, of course, is to blame, thanks to “referral code: Gina30.”) Yet Holt’s arrival isn’t a downer for the audience. It’s a case to be solved — how can Amy and Jake motivate Holt to go back to work and save their honeymoon in the process? — and thus fits the show’s enduring formula. [pmc-related-link href=”https://www.indiewire.com/2018/10/chelsea-peretti-leaving-brooklyn-nine-nine-season-6-1202009231/” type=”Read More:” target=”_blank”]‘Brooklyn Nine-Nine’: Chelsea Peretti Leaving the Show in Upcoming Season, Creator Dan Goor Pens Tribute to Gina[/pmc-related-link] But let’s take a second to elevate the not-so-hidden star of the show: Holt’s shirts. Explaining that he tried to go to work but ended up on a plane to Mexico instead, Holt didn’t pack a bag: “I bought a bundle of novelty shirts at a nearby gift shop. This one says ‘What’s up, beaches?’ — instead of ‘bitches,’ for humor reasons.” The explanation takes mere seconds but it provides an opportunity for bonus fun throughout the episode. Sure, it’s funny when Holt is blankly staring across the restaurant at Amy and Jake’s romantic dinner, but it’s even funnier that he’s doing it in a sleeveless shirt with a buff bod printed on it. And it’s great when Holt breaks into Amy and Jake’s room during a couple’s hot stone massage, laying down on the ground to better facilitate conversation with their face-down positions, but that he’s doing it in a “DTF: Down to Fiesta” t-shirt is the cherry on top of their sundae. Finally, his “1 Tequila, 2 Tequila, 3 Tequila, FLOOR!!!” ensemble is the ideal juxtaposition to Holt’s heartbreaking news that he’s quitting the force. Chelsea Peretti in “Brooklyn Nine-Nine” Of course, he doesn’t quit the force, but the audience needed to see Holt go to that dark place while facing unexpected hardship. “Brooklyn Nine-Nine” has always been about positive, supportive people sacrificing for the greater good and each other. They’re idyllic, if silly, police officers, who forge idyllic, silly friendships. Often, these classic, happy sitcoms result in the characters getting everything they want, sometimes too easily, since rewarding nice people is an easy way to sustain the positive energy driving feel-good comedies. When a character says they’re going after something they really want, audiences expect them to succeed. But “Brooklyn Nine-Nine” doesn’t operate that way — they can’t. Despite Holt’s claims that he’s done everything he set out to do as a captain, there is still crime in Brooklyn and everyone does not love the police. These are never-ending endeavors, and yet they’re the common goals of every character on the show. Moreover, “Brooklyn Nine-Nine” deals with hard issues often enough that audiences don’t always expect easy answers to serious problems. (Terry Crews’ Sergeant Jeffords was racially profiled in his own neighborhood, and it could very well happen again.) So how does the show respect the truth of its world without losing the joyful tone of its characters? It’s the shirts and the “not” and the relentless perseverance springing from both. Goor and his writers consistently find ways to pepper extra doses of humor into each episode’s running time, and the shirts are a stellar sneak-attack of funny in “Honeymoon.” Meanwhile, choosing to not let Holt get his job speaks to the real world fans are living in and the creators are willing to acknowledge. It’s more valuable to watch Holt grieve, nearly quit, and then resolve to fight the powers that almost squashed his career than to hand him a promotion. He obviously deserves it, but is that how things work in 2019? Not everything ties back to Trump, but this choice feels carefully considered for the culture of our times. Happy endings aren’t guaranteed; injustice is still rampant. It would be easy for everyone to fall into despair, and Goor’s series recognizes as much through Holt’s initial reaction. But the joyful spirit of “Brooklyn Nine-Nine” is distinguishable from other sitcoms in that it even though it delivers laughs in droves, it also provides a bit of a pep talk. Viewers need to see Holt lose because they need to see Holt fight back. They need to see persistence so they can emulate it themselves. They need to see “The 99,” and NBC is giving it to them. Grade: A- “Brooklyn Nine-Nine” airs new episodes on Thursdays at 9 p.m. ET on NBC.
11 Jan 19
EW.com

If you’ve been trying to keep your cool, cool, cool during the insufferable wait for new episodes of Brooklyn Nine-Nine since news of its cancellation-turned-revival, there’s finally some good news on the docket: Your wait is officially over. Brooklyn Nine-Nine returns tonight, Jan. 10, at 9 p.m. ET on NBC, kicking off its sixth season and […]

10 Jan 19
Breaking News, Entertainment, Sports & College Life | COED

Brooklyn Nine-Nine returns for its sixth season premiere tonight, albeit on a new channel, as the Andy Samberg comedy made the jump to NBC after being canceled by Fox in 2018. Brooklyn Nine-Nine fans weren’t without their favorite comedy too long, though, as the show was picked back up by NBC soon after its cancellation in Fox. […]