Budget 2019

23 Jul 19
Betsy and Balthasar, Sauti Moja, Tanzania

Tuesday, 23rd July 2019 Where have the quiet Longido days gone? The ones where I can take a wonderful nap in the afternoon and the most exciting thing is our walk into town for a biertje? Things are picking up and we’ve been the last in the office for the past two days already. Coming […]

23 Jul 19
2019 Ohio University in Ireland

By: Olivia Stefanoff Being in the final week of my time here in Ireland I have had a lot of time to reflect on the experiences that I have had. 6 weeks doesn’t seem like much but it feels like it has been a lifetime. I have gotten to know some great people from our […]

23 Jul 19
Newsy Today

At age 45, the director general of the Toronto Opera and former disciple of Gerard Mortier will succeed in 2021 Stéphane Lissner, called to other functions. By Marie-Aude Roux Posted today at 18h43 Time to Reading 3 min. Subscribers article Alexander Neef, in 2008. Michael Stuparyk / Toronto Star via Getty Images The Council of […]

23 Jul 19
Partners Behavorial Health Management - Provider Knowledge Base

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1563910898272{margin-top: 0px !important;padding-top: 0px !important;}”] Issued:  July 23, 2019 [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row el_id=”Alert”][vc_column][vc_column_text] Clarification to July 15, 2019 Alert—Management of Basic Outpatient Services On July 15, Partners issued a Provider Alert announcing that it will no longer manage (require authorization) Basic Outpatient Services as of July 10, 2019. The change is effective beginning with dates of […]

23 Jul 19
Emma Konst

Published on INSIDR, May 28, 2019.Client: Le BHV MaraisKW: Paris furniture store If you’re hoping to revamp your home this season, you’ll want to find the best Paris furniture store during your next visit. In Paris, you can find a variety of furniture stores, from antique pieces to ultra-modern accents. In this article, INSIDR breaks […]

23 Jul 19
Eastieoaks

Goodbye Bernie Wolfe

23 Jul 19
The Denver Post
In the days after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorism attacks, Steve Aseltine and his colleagues at Colorado Task Force 1 spent a week digging through rubble at Ground Zero, a mission that shifted from rescuing survivors to recovering the bodies of those killed in the attacks. Sixty-four members of the task force, headquartered at West Metro Fire Rescue in Lakewood, responded after the attacks. In the air they breathed above Ground Zero were carcinogens, asbestos and more — what one doctor called “a witch’s brew” of damaging chemicals. “We did lose one of the firefighters that we all responded with,” said Aseltine, a division chief for West Metro Fire Rescue and a leader with Colorado Task Force 1. That firefighter, Aaron Lybarger, died last summer from cancer related to his efforts at Ground Zero, Aseltine said. For people like Lybarger and his former Colorado Task Force 1 colleagues, Congress expanded the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund, reimbursing them for health problems associated with their work after terrorists flew planes into the World Trade Center and other sites. At the end of 2018, 163 Coloradans were registered for the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund. Eighty of those had filed claims and 35 had been awarded payments by the end of 2018. In early 2019, the fund’s operators determined they did not have enough money to pay claims through 2020, as previously expected, and would begin cutting payouts. That led to impassioned calls this spring for a permanent reauthorization to avoid similar cuts in the future. “You never want to see someone go broke from being sick, especially when there’s a direct causal link between the service they provided to the country at a time of need,” Aseltine said. “Now, they’re sick years later and we’re not able to provide them the medical treatments that they need to buy them time.” This month, after long delays that frustrated first responders, Congress acted. The House voted 402-12 on July 12 to permanently reauthorize the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund, and the Senate followed suit Tuesday. “After everything the first responders of 9/11 did for us, our nation cannot and will not turn its back on them,” said Sen. Cory Gardner, a Yuma Republican and a leading co-sponsor of the bill. Sen. Michael Bennet, D-Denver, also co-sponsored the legislation and voted for it this week. Among the Colorado delegation, only Rep. Ken Buck, a fiscally conservative Windsor Republican, voted against the reauthorization. Rep. Ed Perlmutter, D-Arvada, was absent during the House vote due to a family obligation, but was a co-sponsor and supporter of the bill. “I support looking after our selfless first responders and their families through the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund, but I could not support the House bill in its current form due to its length of reauthorization, its limitless funding commitment, and complete lack of fiscal offset,” Buck said in a statement Monday. [related_articles location=”right” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”curated” curated_ids=”3549663,3493421,3196715,3207295″] The bill is expected to cost more than $10 billion over the next decade, and billions more after that, according to Congressional Budget Office estimates. Some fiscal conservatives in the Senate objected to the open-ended nature of the bill and slowed its passage as a result. In a letter to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, Buck called the bill a “wrong way to do the right thing.” He favored a five-year or 10-year reauthorization and said permanent reauthorization is an abdication of Congress’ job to oversee and responsibly spend tax dollars. So far Aseltine hasn’t needed the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund – “knock on wood,” he says. But, as he witnessed with colleagues, there’s no telling how long his luck will last. After President Donald Trump signs the reauthorization bill, the 9/11 fund will be there, should he need it. “There’s definitely the potential of that,” he said. “I’ve seen how some of those illnesses have (been) dormant for a while and then popped up.”
23 Jul 19
Energeticcity.ca

FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – After City Council concluded their process to find a suitable vendor to assess the stability of the Old Fort, BGC Engineering Inc was awarded the slope stability study. Due to the significant slide that took place on the Old Fort Road and the implications to the City, the study will […]

23 Jul 19
TV Aerials Leeds

Congress should not have to rely on manufactured crises to do the basic work of managing the federal budget. The editorial board represents the opinions of the board, its editor and the publisher. It is separate from the newsroom and the Op-Ed section. from Pocket https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/23/opinion/end-debt-ceiling.html via FREEVIEW AERIALS LEEDS

23 Jul 19
TV Aerials Sunderland

Congress should not have to rely on manufactured crises to do the basic work of managing the federal budget. The editorial board represents the opinions of the board, its editor and the publisher. It is separate from the newsroom and the Op-Ed section. from Pocket https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/23/opinion/end-debt-ceiling.html via TV/a>

23 Jul 19
Damion Frye

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD Congress should not have to rely on manufactured crises to do the basic work of managing the federal budget. Published: July 22, 2019 at 08:00PM from NYT Opinion https://ift.tt/2OfjwLu via IFTTT

23 Jul 19
National Post

The NCAA put the DePaul on probation for three years — and suspended head coach Dave Leitao for three games — because of conduct surrounding recruiting violations, it announced Tuesday. A former DePaul associate head coach “violated NCAA ethical conduct rules when he knowingly directed the former assistant director of basketball operations to provide impermissible […]

23 Jul 19
The official Washington D.C. news site - timworld.info

National Business California governor announces changes at troubled DMV By KATHLEEN RONAYNE Associated Press July 23, 2019 01:06 PM ORDER REPRINT → FILE – In this Aug. 7, 2018 file photo, an employee for the California Department of Motor Vehicles, left, hands out forms to people waiting in line in the Van Nuys section of […]

23 Jul 19
Burgh Sports United

By Jason Shetler When Neal Huntington took over as General Manager of the Pittsburgh Pirates a little more than a decade ago, the clear objective was to completely build the organization from the ground up, this after the dumpster fire that was left by Dave Littlefield. As fully anticipated, the Pirates experienced major growing pains […]

23 Jul 19
MyTwinTiers
WASHINGTON (AP) — About 3.1 million people would lose food stamp benefits under the Trump administration’s proposal to tighten automatic eligibility requirements for the food stamp program. The Agriculture Department said Tuesday that the rule would close “a loophole” that enables people receiving only minimal benefits from the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program to be eligible automatically for food stamps without undergoing further checks on their income or assets. “For too long, this loophole has been used to effectively bypass important eligibility guidelines. Too often, states have misused this flexibility without restraint,” Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue said in a statement. The proposed rule is the latest in the Trump administration’s efforts to cut back on the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program or SNAP, the official name of the food stamp program. It also has proposed to tighten work requirements for those who receive federal food assistance. USDA estimates that 1.7 million households — 3.1 million people — “will not otherwise meet SNAP’s income and asset eligibility prerequisites under the proposed rule.” That would result in a net savings of about $9.4 billion over five years. An unpublished version of the proposed rule acknowledges the impact, saying it “may also negatively impact food security and reduce the savings rates among those individuals who do not meet the income and resource eligibility requirements for SNAP or the substantial and ongoing requirements for expanded categorical eligibility.” Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich., called the proposal “yet another attempt by this administration to circumvent Congress” and that the effect would be to “take food away from families, prevent children from getting school meals, and make it harder for states to administer food assistance.” Congress has rejected previous, similar attempts to change the expanded automatic eligibility provisions, most recently during the farm bill debate in 2018. Robert Greenstein, president of the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, said the proposal could discourage working families with incomes close to the maximum for SNAP participation from seeking more work out of fear that the added wages could make them ineligible for the program. “The proposed rule would weaken SNAP’s role in supporting work while making it harder for families that struggle to get by on low wages to meet their basic needs,” he said. About 36 million people participated in SNAP in April 2019, down from more than 38 million a year earlier. Under current law, states may automatically make people eligible for food stamps, if they meet income and other requirements for TANF. USDA says 43 states have expanded that to include households that it says “barely participate” in TANF. The provision is called “expanded categorical eligibility.” USDA said the policy has resulted in people receiving food stamps who don’t need it and wouldn’t qualify under regular program rules. Ellen Vollinger, legal director of the Food Research & Action Center, said the proposal was troubling and that the government should “put attention on how to help more people, not undercut supports for them and make their struggle against hunger even harder.” She said the department didn’t seem to address a resulting loss of school meals, which she said the Congressional Budget Office included in its analyses of previous, similar proposals. “It’s another hit on hunger,” she said. Under the proposal, to qualify for automatic eligibility, people would have to get at least $50 a month in benefits from TANF for a minimum of six months. Perdue said the change is necessary for “preventing abuse of a critical safety net system so those who need food assistance the most are the only ones who receive it.” The rule, expected to be published in the Federal Register on Wednesday, is open for public comment for 60 days.