Burris

20 Feb 19
Pinoy 3Gunner's Blog

Carry Optics Glock 34 with a Burris Fastfire 3, 13# recoil spring, using regular, 140mm Dawson (21) and TTI (22) Extended mags with 125gr BlB and 124gr BB loads. Little tired from working the Florida Open, but back at it. Stage 3 Slowing down to get my hits. On the move for the first 2 […]

20 Feb 19
South Paw Draw - 100% Authentic Shooting, Hunting, Tactical & Outdoor Gear

Burris Fullfield Ii, Rifle Scope, 3-9x Power, 40 Objective, 1″, Ballistic Plex Reticle, Rear Focal Plane, Nickle 200169 Model: Fullfield IIProduct Type: Rifle ScopeFinish/Color: NickelDescription: Rear Focal PlaneSize: 1

20 Feb 19
Times-Herald
A 20-year-old man shot and killed by six officers on Feb. 9 was struck more than 20 times, an attorney representing his family said. Vallejo police declined to comment Tuesday on the new information released by Oakland attorney John Burris about Willie McCoy’s death outside a Vallejo Taco Bell on the 900 block of Admiral Callaghan Lane. “He was shot to pieces,” Burris said by phone. “It’s unconscionable.” Melissa Nold, an attorney in Burris’ firm, told NBC News that she viewed McCoy’s body last week. She reported that McCoy was shot in his face, throat, chest, arm and shoulders, and part of his ear was blown off. A video clip taken by a man who was parked nearby contains the sounds of the shooting. In it, more than a dozen shots can be heard less than three seconds after police are heard yelling commands at McCoy to put his hands up. McCoy’s family is planning to file a legal claim — a precursor to a lawsuit — against the Vallejo police department, Burris said. Vallejo police have been under scrutiny since the Feb. 9 shooting, which began around 10:30 p.m. when Taco Bell employees called 911 to report McCoy was “hunched over” behind the wheel of a silver Mercedes sedan in the drive-through. Two officers responded to the Taco Bell, and found McCoy “unresponsive” in the locked car with a handgun in his lap. When the officers saw a gun in the man’s lap, they called for backup, a Vallejo police news release says. Four more officers arrived at the restaurant. They tried the car door, “with the intention of one officer swiftly retrieving the firearm from the subject’s lap, while another officer covered him,” but it was locked, according to the release. Then they began positioning a patrol car in front of McCoy’s car. During this time McCoy began to move. Police say they yelled commands at him to raise his hands. After they took steps to keep the car from rolling and called for backup, officers said McCoy moved. They ordered him to keep his hands where they could be seen, but McCoy allegedly reached for the gun in his lap, police said. Fearing for their lives, officers fired on the man, killing him, police said. Police say the weapon in McCoy’s lap, a .40 caliber semiautomatic handgun with an extended magazine, had been reported stolen out of Oregon. McCoy’s family and friends have questioned police’s use of force in the case, which has generated national and international attention. They say one window in McCoy’s car was broken and covered in plastic, meaning officers could have gained entry by tearing through it. “They didn’t try any peaceful solution that would have stopped them from taking his life,” said Willie McCoy’s older brother, Marc McCoy, in an interview with the San Francisco Chronicle last week. The Northern California branch of the American Civil Liberties Union issued a statement last week calling for stricter police use of force policies across California, citing Willie McCoy’s killing. “This is a matter of life and death: California can and must update its deadly use of force laws and provide officers with adequate guidance to successfully resolve situations like the one that resulted in Mr. McCoy’s death without anyone dying,” the ACLU statement says. Police have yet to release the names of the six officers involved in the shooting. A public records request for the names, filed by this newspaper, is pending. It also took police about five days to officially confirm that Willie McCoy was the person shot and killed by Vallejo officers, despite being widely reported in the media and confirmed by his family. Burris said Tuesday that his office has not filed a claim against the city of Vallejo yet. “It’s in the works,” he confirmed. McCoy’s killing is similar to another Vallejo police shooting from August 2017, when five of the city’s officers killed Benicia resident Jeffrey Barboa as he walked slowly toward officers, a machete-like knife raised above his head. Barboa was struck 41 times and died. A coroner’s inquest jury later ruled 8-4 his death was a suicide. Burris’ law offices are also representing another man whose violent encounter with an officer has led to impending legal action. Days before McCoy was killed, Vallejo police put an officer on administrative leave for tackling a city resident who was attempting to film a traffic stop. The man who was tackled, Adrian Burrell, said he too plans to file a legal claim against the department.
20 Feb 19
The Mercury News
VALLEJO — A 20-year-old man shot and killed by six officers on Feb. 9 was struck more than 20 times, an attorney representing his family said. Vallejo police declined to comment Tuesday on the new information released by Oakland attorney John Burris about Willie McCoy’s death outside a Vallejo Taco Bell on the 900 block of Admiral Callaghan Lane. “He was shot to pieces,” Burris said by phone. “It’s unconscionable.” Melissa Nold, an attorney in Burris’ firm, told NBC News that she viewed McCoy’s body last week. She reported that McCoy was shot in his face, throat, chest, arm and shoulders, and part of his ear was blown off. A video clip taken by a man who was parked nearby contains the sounds of the shooting. In it, more than a dozen shots can be heard less than three seconds after police are heard yelling commands at McCoy to put his hands up. McCoy’s family is planning to file a legal claim — a precursor to a lawsuit — against the Vallejo police department, Burris said. Vallejo police have been under scrutiny since the Feb. 9 shooting, which began around 10:30 p.m. when Taco Bell employees called 911 to report McCoy was “hunched over” behind the wheel of a silver Mercedes sedan in the drive-through. Two officers responded to the Taco Bell, and found McCoy “unresponsive” in the locked car with a handgun in his lap. When the officers saw a gun in the man’s lap, they called for backup, a Vallejo police news release says. Four more officers arrived at the restaurant. They tried the car door, “with the intention of one officer swiftly retrieving the firearm from the subject’s lap, while another officer covered him,” but it was locked, according to the release. Then they began positioning a patrol car in front of McCoy’s car. During this time McCoy began to move. Police say they yelled commands at him to raise his hands. After they took steps to keep the car from rolling and called for backup, officers said McCoy moved. They ordered him to keep his hands where they could be seen, but McCoy allegedly reached for the gun in his lap, police said. Fearing for their lives, officers fired on the man, killing him, police said. Police say the weapon in McCoy’s lap, a .40 caliber semiautomatic handgun with an extended magazine, had been reported stolen out of Oregon. McCoy’s family and friends have questioned police’s use of force in the case, which has generated national and international attention. They say one window in McCoy’s car was broken and covered in plastic, meaning officers could have gained entry by tearing through it. “They didn’t try any peaceful solution that would have stopped them from taking his life,” said Willie McCoy’s older brother, Marc McCoy, in an interview with the San Francisco Chronicle last week. The Northern California branch of the American Civil Liberties Union issued a statement last week calling for stricter police use of force policies across California, citing Willie McCoy’s killing. “This is a matter of life and death: California can and must update its deadly use of force laws and provide officers with adequate guidance to successfully resolve situations like the one that resulted in Mr. McCoy’s death without anyone dying,” the ACLU statement says. Police have yet to release the names of the six officers involved in the shooting. A public records request for the names, filed by this newspaper, is pending. It also took police about five days to officially confirm that Willie McCoy was the person shot and killed by Vallejo officers, despite being widely reported in the media and confirmed by his family. Burris said Tuesday that his office has not filed a claim against the city of Vallejo yet. “It’s in the works,” he confirmed. McCoy’s killing is similar to another Vallejo police shooting from August 2017, when five of the city’s officers killed Benicia resident Jeffrey Barboa as he walked slowly toward officers, a machete-like knife raised above his head. Barboa was struck 41 times and died. A coroner’s inquest jury later ruled 8-4 his death was a suicide. Burris’ law offices are also representing another man whose violent encounter with an officer has led to impending legal action. Days before McCoy was killed, Vallejo police put an officer on administrative leave for tackling a city resident who was attempting to film a traffic stop. The man who was tackled, Adrian Burrell, said he too plans to file a legal claim against the department.
20 Feb 19
East Bay Times
VALLEJO — A 20-year-old man shot and killed by six officers on Feb. 9 was struck more than 20 times, an attorney representing his family said. Vallejo police declined to comment Tuesday on the new information released by Oakland attorney John Burris about Willie McCoy’s death outside a Vallejo Taco Bell on the 900 block of Admiral Callaghan Lane. “He was shot to pieces,” Burris said by phone. “It’s unconscionable.” Melissa Nold, an attorney in Burris’ firm, told NBC News that she viewed McCoy’s body last week. She reported that McCoy was shot in his face, throat, chest, arm and shoulders, and part of his ear was blown off. A video clip taken by a man who was parked nearby contains the sounds of the shooting. In it, more than a dozen shots can be heard less than three seconds after police are heard yelling commands at McCoy to put his hands up. McCoy’s family is planning to file a legal claim — a precursor to a lawsuit — against the Vallejo police department, Burris said. Vallejo police have been under scrutiny since the Feb. 9 shooting, which began around 10:30 p.m. when Taco Bell employees called 911 to report McCoy was “hunched over” behind the wheel of a silver Mercedes sedan in the drive-through. Two officers responded to the Taco Bell, and found McCoy “unresponsive” in the locked car with a handgun in his lap. When the officers saw a gun in the man’s lap, they called for backup, a Vallejo police news release says. Four more officers arrived at the restaurant. They tried the car door, “with the intention of one officer swiftly retrieving the firearm from the subject’s lap, while another officer covered him,” but it was locked, according to the release. Then they began positioning a patrol car in front of McCoy’s car. During this time McCoy began to move. Police say they yelled commands at him to raise his hands. After they took steps to keep the car from rolling and called for backup, officers said McCoy moved. They ordered him to keep his hands where they could be seen, but McCoy allegedly reached for the gun in his lap, police said. Fearing for their lives, officers fired on the man, killing him, police said. Police say the weapon in McCoy’s lap, a .40 caliber semiautomatic handgun with an extended magazine, had been reported stolen out of Oregon. McCoy’s family and friends have questioned police’s use of force in the case, which has generated national and international attention. They say one window in McCoy’s car was broken and covered in plastic, meaning officers could have gained entry by tearing through it. “They didn’t try any peaceful solution that would have stopped them from taking his life,” said Willie McCoy’s older brother, Marc McCoy, in an interview with the San Francisco Chronicle last week. The Northern California branch of the American Civil Liberties Union issued a statement last week calling for stricter police use of force policies across California, citing Willie McCoy’s killing. “This is a matter of life and death: California can and must update its deadly use of force laws and provide officers with adequate guidance to successfully resolve situations like the one that resulted in Mr. McCoy’s death without anyone dying,” the ACLU statement says. Police have yet to release the names of the six officers involved in the shooting. A public records request for the names, filed by this newspaper, is pending. It also took police about five days to officially confirm that Willie McCoy was the person shot and killed by Vallejo officers, despite being widely reported in the media and confirmed by his family. Burris said Tuesday that his office has not filed a claim against the city of Vallejo yet. “It’s in the works,” he confirmed. McCoy’s killing is similar to another Vallejo police shooting from August 2017, when five of the city’s officers killed Benicia resident Jeffrey Barboa as he walked slowly toward officers, a machete-like knife raised above his head. Barboa was struck 41 times and died. A coroner’s inquest jury later ruled 8-4 his death was a suicide. Burris’ law offices are also representing another man whose violent encounter with an officer has led to impending legal action. Days before McCoy was killed, Vallejo police put an officer on administrative leave for tackling a city resident who was attempting to film a traffic stop. The man who was tackled, Adrian Burrell, said he too plans to file a legal claim against the department.
19 Feb 19
ViperPay

2019-02-19 20:55:45 [ad_1] Hiring the right employee for a position at your small business can be tough. But you’re not alone. Did you know Kansas City startups like yours create over 16,000 jobs on average a year? That’s a lot of jobs … and small-business owners like you are trying to match many of those […]

19 Feb 19

Sudan protesters remain resilient, but Bashir unbowed Sudanese protesters take part in an anti-government demonstration in Khartoum on February 14, 2019. – Hundreds of Sudanese rallied today, including at a camp for people displaced by war, witnesses said, after campaigners called for anti-government demonstrators to show support for millions affected by conflicts. Deadly protests that […]

19 Feb 19
Art Law & More

The countdown is on to when the UK leaves the EU on 29 March and as the Brexit clock tolls, the art world is making preparations.

19 Feb 19
Archy Worldys

PREP HOCKEY District tournament pairings IN THE TAM-O-SHANTER ARENA WEDNESDAY's results Perrysburg 10, Sylvania Southview 0 Oregon Clay 11, Maumee 1 DISTRICT QUARTERFINALS Toledo St. John's 11, Toledo Whitmer 1 Findlay 3, Perrysburg 1 Sylvania Northview 6, Anthony Wayne 3 Toledo St. Francis 11, Oregon Clay 1 FRIDAY DISTRIBUTION SEMIFINALS (1) Toledo St. Johns vs. […]

19 Feb 19
Harding Rams Booster Club

@HUHSAthletics is so proud of Royal Burris @BurrisRoyal committing to East Carolina for Track! @HUHSRAMS_TRACK does an awesome job in developing great athletes! #speedkills Check out Royal’s video! pic.twitter.com/VSWw6BzTRt — Matt Morrow – Pepman (@pepmancv) February 19, 2019  

19 Feb 19
Pinoy 3Gunner's Blog

The last time I shot the Florida Open was 10 years ago. Back then, I shot in Production with the G34. I shoot it 10 years later with the same gun, but now topped off with a red dot. I also shoot and work the match: shoot on Thursday, work the match Friday thru Sunday. […]

19 Feb 19
SCNG
The family of a 38-year-old man who died after struggling with police has filed a lawsuit against the city of Anaheim and its police department, alleging the man was beaten and choked to death. The suit alleging wrongful death, filed Saturday, Feb. 16, in federal court alleges two officers repeatedly struck Justin Perkins on his face, head and body with their fists and batons. One of the officers, the suit further alleges, held Perkins in a choke hold as he tried to break free. A city spokesman, however, said “officers responded to a call for help for someone being assaulted and acted in their duty as peace officers.” John Burris and DeWitt Lacy, attorneys for Justin’s mother Teresa, recounted the events of that day during a Monday, Feb. 18 news  conference held in front of the same complex where the confrontation took place. #gallery-1632734-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1632734-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1632734-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1632734-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Theresa Smith offers some emotional support to Teresa Perkins. Smith said her own son, Ceasar Cruz, was killed by Anahiem police in 2009. Civil rights attorney John Burris announces the filing of a federal lawsuit Monday, Feb. 18, 2019 against the city of Anaheim and the Anaheim Police Department in connection with the Oct. 31, 2018 death of Justin Perkins following an altercation with Anaheim police on Oct. 27, 2018. (Photo by Michael Fernandez, Contributing Photographer) Justin Perkins’ sister, Jody Gigliotti, center, speaks to the press as civil rights attorney John Burris announces the filing of a federal lawsuit Monday, Feb. 18, 2019 against the city of Anaheim and the Anaheim Police Department in connection with the Oct. 31, 2018 death of Justin Perkins following an altercation with Anaheim police on Oct. 27, 2018. (Photo by Michael Fernandez, Contributing Photographer) Led by Justin Perkins’ sister, Jody Gigliotti, and uncle, David Michael Perkins, people march on the Anaheim Police Department as civil rights attorney John Burris announces the filing of a federal lawsuit Monday, Feb. 18, 2019 against the city of Anaheim and the Anaheim Police Department in connection with the Oct. 31, 2018 death of Justin Perkins following an altercation with Anaheim police on Oct. 27, 2018. (Photo by Michael Fernandez, Contributing Photographer) Justin Perkins’ uncle, David Michael Perkins, right, speaks while Justin’s mother, Teresa, center, listens during a press conference in which civil rights attorney John Burris announced the filing of a federal lawsuit Monday, Feb. 18, 2019 against the city of Anaheim and the Anaheim Police Department in connection with the Oct. 31, 2018 death of Justin Perkins. (Photo by Michael Fernandez, Contributing Photographer) Anahiem police question a few people sitting on the curb as protesters march on the police department as civil rights attorney John Burris announced the filing of a federal lawsuit Monday, Feb. 18, 2019 against the city of Anaheim and the Anaheim Police Department in connection with the Oct. 31, 2018 death of Justin Perkins. (Photo by Michael Fernandez, Contributing Photographer) Justin Perkins’ uncle David Michael Perkins wipes a tear as civil rights attorney John Burris, left, announces the filing of a federal lawsuit Monday, Feb. 18, 2019 against the city of Anaheim and the Anaheim Police Department in connection with the Oct. 31, 2018 death of Justin Perkins. (Photo by Michael Fernandez, Contributing Photographer) Justin Perkins’ mother, Teresa Perkins, speaks as Justin’s uncle, David Michael Perkins, right, and civil rights attorney John Burris announce the filing of a federal lawsuit Monday, Feb. 18, 2019 against the city of Anaheim and the Anaheim Police Department in connection with the Oct. 31, 2018 death of Justin Perkins. (Photo by Michael Fernandez, Contributing Photographer) A photo of Justin Perkins in a hospital bed was displayed at a news conference Monday. Civil rights attorney John Burris announced the filing of a federal lawsuit Monday, Feb. 18, 2019 against the city of Anaheim and the Anaheim Police Department in connection with the Oct. 31, 2018 death of Perkins following an altercation with Anaheim police on Oct. 27, 2018. (Photo by Michael Fernandez, Contributing Photographer) Justin Perkins’ uncle, David Michael Perkins, speaks at a news conference as civil rights attorney John Burris announces the filing of a federal lawsuit Monday, Feb. 18, 2019 against the city of Anaheim and the Anaheim Police Department in connection with the Oct. 31, 2018 death of Justin Perkins. (Photo by Michael Fernandez, Contributing Photographer) Civil rights attorney John Burris announced the filing of a federal lawsuit Monday, Feb. 18, 2019 against the city of Anaheim and the Anaheim Police Department in connection with the Oct. 31, 2018 death of Justin Perkins following an altercation with Anaheim police on Oct. 27, 2018. Photos of Perkins were shown at a news conference. (Photo by Michael Fernandez, Contributing Photographer) On the morning of Oct. 27, 2018 at about 8:30 a.m. a caller reported that a man had assaulted an employee at the Madison Park Apartments on West Broadway. When officers arrived they tried to take the suspect, later identified as Perkins, into custody but he resisted and an altercation ensued, Anaheim police said at the time. He was taken into custody and went into cardiac arrest shortly after. He was taken to a hospital but died days later on Oct. 31. “There was no indication he was involved in illegal activity…that would justify this use of force,” Burris said. Burris and Perkins’ family members say Perkins was biploar and that they have been told no information about the initial call that prompted police to respond. Perkins’ uncle Mike Perkins broke down in tears and he retold witnessing the events that morning. The two lived together, along with Perkins’ father, in the apartment on West Broadway. Mike Perkins said his nephew had gone out to get the mail. After a little while he heard Perkins yelling and went outside to what he thought was his nephew being jumped. “I see badges, I see guns…and I yell ‘Please, you’re hurting him!’,” Perkins said, adding that he told them he was mentally impaired. He described his nephew as a “gentle giant” who had the mental capacities of a 12-year-old. “There is a difference between a drug addict and a mentally challenged person…(Police officers) need to be retrained to tell the difference.” The complaints also details how Perkins’ body eventually went “limp” and he was handcuffed. The officers, named in the complaint as Shiao Wang and Kenny Lee, stood him up and he walked a few feet before collapsing. It says he appeared unconscious and not breathing and it was 45 minutes before he was given medical care and taken to a hospital, where he was on life support before being pronounced dead days later. The complaint details other alleged civil rights violations including excessive force and denial of medical care. His family also disputed reports that Perkins was high on drugs, saying he didn’t use any beyond his medication. After the news conference, about two dozen people marched from the apartment complex to the front of the Anaheim Police Department headquarters on Harbor Boulevard holding signs emblazoned with the image of Perkins on life support in the hospital. Burris said his office has asked Anaheim police for the body camera footage of the incident, but has been turned down. “Any public release of body-worn camera footage before those reviews are done would be premature,”  Anaheim city spokesman Mike Lyster said in response to a question about the release of police body camera footage. Anaheim police initially reported that two officers had been “seriously injured” but no details about their injuries were made public. Mike Perkins, though, recalled one of the officers complaining about having been bitten. Two officers who were injured during the confrontation were treated and released from a hospital by the next day, police have said. But they have not yet been cleared to return to work, Lyster said Monday. The family is seeking unspecified compensatory and punitive damages. “Our thoughts go out to any family that has lost a loved one,” Lyster said in a statement released shortly before the Perkins family’s press conference. “Our officers responded to a call for help for someone being assaulted and acted in their duty as peace officers. They sustained serious injuries and have yet to be cleared to return to work. Beyond that, we want to respect all involved by letting reviews of the incident and any legal process play out.” [cq comment=”The following content will display as an info box.”] Related links 2 Anaheim officers released from hospital after weekend incident with assault suspect Anaheim man suspected of seriously hurting two police officers in October altercation dies in custody [cq comment=”This is the end of the info box.”] The incident is under review by the Orange County District Attorney’s Office and the Anaheim Police Department’s Major Incident Review Team.
19 Feb 19
Archy news nety

PREP HOCKEY District Tournament-pairings AT TAM-O-SHANTER ARENA The results of WEDNESDAY Perrysburg 10, Sylvania Southview 0 Oregon Clay 11, Maumee 1 DISTRICT QUARTER FALSE Toledo St. John's 11, Toledo Whitmer 1 Findlay 3, Perrysburg 1 Sylvania Northview 6, Anthony Wayne 3 Toledo St. Francis 11, Oregon Clay 1 FRIDAY & # 39; S DISTRICT SEMIFINALS […]