Cachet

18 Apr 19
other thousands

Where by to Go in 2019 The 21 destinations that will be specially incredibly hot this year-and the information you need to system your trip. is one of the best value hong kong hotels you could find at such a prime location. This year, address your travel bucket listing like your business office to-do listing […]

18 Apr 19
News Archives Uk

Victoria Beckham never claimed to be the best singer in the Spice Girls, or the best dancer either. Nor was David Beckham the greatest footballer ever to wear a Manchester United shirt. The team's former manager Alex Ferguson once said he had never worked with four world-class players and did not include Beckham on his […]

18 Apr 19
Twin Cities
WASHINGTON — Some government foolishness has an educational value that compensates for its considerable cost. Consider the multibillion-dollar federal electric-vehicle tax credit, which efficiently illustrates how government can, with one act, diminish its already-negligible prestige while subtracting from America’s fairness. Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., and Rep. Jason Smith, R-Mo., hope to repeal the tax credit, which probably will survive because it does something that government enjoys doing: It transfers wealth upward by subsidizing affluent individuals and large economic entities. In 1992, Congress, with its itch to supplant the market in telling people what to build and buy, established a subsidy for buyers of electric vehicles, which then were a negligible fraction of the vehicle market. In 2009, however, as the nation reeled from the Great Recession, the Obama administration acted on an axiom of the president’s chief of staff, Rahm Emanuel: “You never want a serious crisis to go to waste.” Using the crisis as an excuse to do what they wanted to do anyway, those who think government planning of the U.S economy is a neat idea joined with environmentalists to persuade Congress — persuading it to dispense money is not difficult — to create a tax credit of up to $7,500 for consumers who buy battery-powered electric vehicles. The tax credit was part of the administration’s “stimulus” package, which is most remembered for its promise of “shovel-ready” jobs. The president, too busy expanding the government to understand the consequences of prior expansions, discovered that such jobs are almost nonexistent, thanks to red tape that must be untangled before shovels can be wielded. The tax credit quickly became another example of the government’s solicitousness for those who are comfortable, and who are skillful in defense of their comforts. Today, demand for electric cars is still insufficient to produce manufacturing economies of scale (after a decade of production, moral exhortations and subsidies, electric cars are a fraction of 1 percent of all vehicle sales), and batteries are expensive. So, The Wall Street Journal reports, the $42,000 average price for an electric car is $8,000 more than the average price of a new car, and $22,000 more than the average price of a new small gasoline-powered car. The Pacific Research Institute has examined 2014 IRS data showing that 79 percent of the electric-vehicle tax credits were collected by households with adjusted gross incomes of more than $100,000, and 1 percent by households earning less than $50,000. A 2017 survey found that households earning $200,000 received the most from the tax credit. Some states have augmented the federal credit: In California, where about half of electric vehicles are sold, consumers can gain up to $15,000; in insolvent Connecticut — blue states are incorrigible — $10,500. The credit is, however, capped: Manufacturers can only sell 200,000 vehicles eligible for the full credit. Now almost all manufacturers (including high-end companies Bentley, Aston Martin and Maserati) are entering the electric-vehicle sector, and the cap is impinging on some of them (General Motors, Nissan). So, at long last such vehicles can be allowed to sink or swim on their own, right? Of course not. The Barrasso-Smith legislation is fiercely opposed by the manufacturers, who of course want to expand and entrench it by removing the cap, partly because they know what the Journal knows: “When Georgia ended its $5,000 state tax credit in 2015, sales of electric vehicles fell 89 percent in two months.” Electric cars have cachet with advanced thinkers who want to be, or to be seen to be, environmentally nice. They do not think of such vehicles as 27.4 percent coal cars, that being the percentage of U.S. electricity generated by coal-fired power plants. According to a Manhattan Institute study: “(B)ecause of stringent emissions standards and low-sulfur gasoline, new ICVs (internal combustion vehicles) today emit very little pollution, and they will emit even less in the future. Compared with new ICVs, ZEVs (zero-emissions vehicles) charged with the forecast mix of electric generation will emit more criteria air pollutants.” And the reduction of carbon dioxide — “less than 1 percent of total forecast(ed) energy-related U.S. CO2 emissions through 2050” — “will have no measurable impact on climate.” The environmental excuse for the regressive tax credit being nonexistent, those Democratic senators whose presidential campaigns are fueled by fury about government being “rigged” for the benefit of “the rich” who are not paying “their fair share” will join their Wyoming colleague’s attempt to end the electric-vehicle tax credit, if they mean what they say. If. George Will’s email address is georgewill@washpost.com.  
18 Apr 19
Shawn Miller

Washington • Some government foolishness has an educational value that compensates for its considerable cost. Consider the multibillion-dollar federal electric-vehicle tax credit, which efficiently illustrates how government can, with one act, diminish its already-negligible prestige while subtracting from America’s fairness. Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., and Rep. Jason Smith, R-Mo., hope to repeal the tax credit, […]

17 Apr 19

Sustainable Systems

 Blog Post #10 Choose one of the green rating systems introduced in class or another of your choosing.  Based on what you learned and independent research of your own, critique this rating system and list a minimum of five (5) pros and five (5) cons of applying this rating system to a building project.  What kinds of […]

17 Apr 19
Aurore Vallon

Aujourd’hui, direction le Grand-Est pour vous faire découvrir un département qui ne manque pas de cachet, la Marne ! Votre prochain séjour sera placé sous le signe du bon-vivre, car c’est bien connu, la Marne est un important producteur de champagne. Alors n’hésitez plus et partez dès demain parcourir les vignobles champenois, où cadres magnifiques et […]

17 Apr 19
9to5Google
In cars, Google Assistant provides distraction-free help without having to interact with touchscreens. It’s already accessible through Android Auto and Google Maps on your existing phone, but Google at CES announced a new class of Assistant device to improve the experience by adding dedicated mics. Today, the Anker Roav Bolt is launching for Android and in beta on iOS. Plugging into and powered by a car’s cigarette lighter, the Anker Roav Bolt has a minimal profile. It’s a round knob that features the four standard Assistant lights, flanked by dual noise-canceling microphones that listen through ambient car and road noise. For those that don’t want to use the “Hey Google” hotword, there is physical button featuring the Assistant logo for manual voice entry. A double-press will mute the mics, with four orange lights noting that status, just like Google Home. The Roav Bolt features two 12W USB ports on its side for charging, as well as a 3.5mm jack for AUX output on older vehicles without Bluetooth. In fact, the best voice recognition experience is over cable, with Google impressively demoing the Bolt picking up a hotword even while a very loud song was playing. This Assistant device acts as an intermediary between your car’s speaker system and your phone. When users ask for directions, traffic information, or start a call, it is picked up on the Roav Bolt’s microphones, processed on your phone, and then played through the car’s speaker system. Voice recognition is performed right on the accessory, with Google noting a minimal impact on the paired phone’s battery life that’s comparable to connecting to any other Bluetooth speaker. These Assistant car accessories can provide help in four main areas: Navigation:  A command like “Navigate home” will work in conjunction with the Google Maps app on your phone to show directions on screen. Others include “How’s the traffic?” and “Find a gas station on the way.” Tied with messaging, Assistant can also text travel ETAs to your contacts. Communication: Meanwhile, Assistant allows you to safely interact with messages while driving. “Proactive notification” will play a chime through the Roav Bolt to announce who’s messaging, with the ability to have that full text read loud. Once in a back-and-forth conversation, Assistant is smart enough to automatically read any future alerts in full without first needing confirmation. Users can of course verbally reply, and initiate calls or new messages. When calling someone through the Roav Bolt, the four lights will turn green to note that the mic is active. Incoming notifications can be customized on an app-by-app basis right in Google Assistant settings. Entertainment: Another big activity in cars is listening to music or podcasts. Users can ask Assistant to start songs, audiobooks, and more with a standard “Play” command. Any playing audio will be silenced while issuing a voice command. Like other Home speakers, Google imagines the Roav Bolt being shared with everyone in a car. It’s a faster way for people in the back seat to change songs and adjust volume. Get things done: The last area covers everything from smart home commands to check the status of your lights or security system, as well as setting reminders, adding to shopping lists, and getting an agenda. The best experience at launch today is on Android, with iOS currently in beta. Downloading the Google Assistant app from the App Store will allow users to pair the Roav Bolt, but interactions might be slower compared to Android. For Google and accessory makers (JBL also announced a unit at CES), this is an affordable way to get a better Assistant experience into vehicles compared to pricey aftermarket head units or buying a car with Android Auto built-in. Another use case is modern cars that do have smart features, but not Google’s. With Assistant having a brand cachet on voice help, buyers might actively seek out a way to get the smart assistant they already use into their cars. While Assistant has expanded to other form factors like Smart Displays, it is still most known for voice help. With the Roav Bolt, Google is going after users that are familiar or might prefer a screen-less experience when driving. Compared to using Assistant in Maps or the Android Auto app, the Roav Bolt delivers a more integrated experience. You can just enter a car and lay your phone anywhere to have everything connect and start getting help. However, the key innovation — especially for those that just put their phone on a dock while driving — is the always-on microphones. In my brief demo, I was quite amazed at how “Hey Google” was recognizable even when music was blaring quite loudly. Unfortunately, Google does not have any plans to let you use this mic with Android Auto on phones. In the case of the Roav Bolt, it’s an easy sell as the device could easily replace any other USB charging accessory in your car. The Anker Roav Bolt starts shipping today and costs $49.99. It will also be available at Best Buy, Target, and Wal-Mart in the coming weeks.
17 Apr 19
Xiaoling Chen

In “Community College Students Face a Very Long Road to Graduation,” Ginia Bellafante states the Community College students take a long time to graduate their associate degrade because they are from lower class families, and some of them are parents, so they need to take care of many things. As Ginia argus, “The majority of […]

17 Apr 19
Repeating Islands

A report by Sarah Marsh for Reuters. A blustering bureaucrat fills a form out with your personal details and hands you a badge declaring you an inspector qualified to police Communist-run Cuba’s cultural sector under a controversial new decree. This interactive performance by Cuban artist Leandro Feal, 33, is one of the politically charged artworks in […]