Cal State Fullerton Sports

25 Mar 19
Tom Hoffarth's The Drill: More Farther Off the Wall

Mike Trout should have won a playoff game by now. Via @FiveThirtyEight: https://t.co/w1vSdHJVaY pic.twitter.com/5O4oxk0LpX — ABC News (@ABC) March 19, 2019 “I really see us winning a championship here.” – @MikeTrout pic.twitter.com/14MVChIMeU — Los Angeles Angels (@Angels) March 24, 2019 Breaking news from FiveThirtyEight.com (and reissued by ABC News): “Mike Trout should have won a […]

23 Mar 19
Archy Worldys

National Basketball Federation Eastern Conference Atlantic Division W L Pct GB x-Toronto 51 21 .708 – x-Philadelphia 47 25 653 4 Boston 43 29 .597 8 Brooklyn 37 36,507 14.5 New York 14 58,194 37 Southeast Division W L Pct GB Miami 35 36 .493 – Orlando 34 38 .472 1.5 Charlotte 32 39 .451 […]

22 Mar 19
Archy news nety

National Basketball Association Eastern Conference Atlantic Division W L PCT GB x-Toronto 51 21 0.708 – x-Philadelphia 47 25 0,653 4 Boston 43 29 0.597 8 Brooklyn 37 36 0.557 14.5 New York 14 58,194 37 Southeast division W L PCT GB Miami 35 36 0.493 – Orlando 34 38 .472 1.5 Charlotte 32 39 […]

22 Mar 19
Nouvelles Du Monde

Asssociation nationale de Basketball Conférence orientale Division Atlantique W L Pct GB x-Toronto 51 21 .708 – x-Philadelphia 47 25 .653 4 Boston 43 29 .597 8 Brooklyn 37 36 .507 14,5 New York 14 58 .194 37 Division du sud-est W L Pct GB Miami 35 36 .493 – Orlando 34 38 .472 1,5 […]

22 Mar 19
JMU Sports News

Where does JMU baseball stand going into the first weekend of CAA play?

21 Mar 19
JMU Sports News

JMU baseball split its recent series with Fairfield. Here are the key takeaways from the 18 innings of action.

21 Mar 19
Orange County Register
We hear about the “Tommy John” operation so frequently in the sports news that it almost measures up to traditional statistics such as batting average and ERA. But the reality of the arm surgery is daunting, and the recovery, rehabilitation and return to the field, especially for a pitcher, are never guaranteed for success. For Cal State Fullerton right-handed pitcher Evan Larsen, a red-shirt freshman who graduated from Corona del Mar High in 2016, it is a dream finally coming true. Larsen, a two-time Pacific Coast League Pitcher of the Year for the Sea Kings, underwent Tommy John surgery in April 2017 and made his long-awaited collegiate pitching debut last month. “I am ecstatic to be back out on the mound competing again,” said Larsen, who grew up rooting for the Titans and “wanted to play for Cal State Fullerton ever since I was 12. For that to be taken away from me for two years and to get that back and just to be around the guys, first and foremost before being able to compete, has been very special for both my family and I.” The 6-foot-4 Larsen started 2019 in the Titans’ bullpen and has appeared in three games, striking out four in six innings. “I have shown I can start, be a set-up guy, and close, so I feel I provide a range of flexibility and can be used however they want to use me,” Larsen said. Two weeks after his surgery, Larsen began a careful rehab process and slowly built up strength in his wrist and forearm, adding numbers to the reps in physical therapy about every two weeks. Larsen worked with longtime former Angel trainer Ned Bergert at Select Physical Therapy for about two months and finished with a 10-month stint at Sports Medicine Institute before being cleared to take the mound again. “My rehab process took a full year, but I was not cleared to throw in games until I was at 18 months post operation, which is what my coaching and training staff at Fullerton agreed on with my doctor, just to give myself extra recovery time so that way nothing went wrong,” Larsen said. “Typically for pitchers it is recommended to wait longer and that way the chances of re-injuring go down the longer you wait and since we had plenty of pitching and I was able to utilize a red shirt and a medical red shirt, thankfully I was able to take my time in rehabbing my elbow.” Larsen started a throwing program four months after surgery, and it required a few more months to get his mechanics together and “regenerating the muscle memory of throwing,” Larsen said. Larsen was instructed not to pitch summer ball in 2018, and instead continued to focus on working out at a Costa Mesa facility with his trainer, Josh Reidt. “I started throwing again slowly in July until getting back on campus in August and then I would face live batters for the first time in October of 2018,” said Larsen, whose fastball is touching 91 mph, setting up his two-seam fastball, 12-6 curveball and change-up. “My fastball is nothing eye-popping, but it sits around 90 to 91 if I am feeling good, but typically can sit around 88 to 90, which is hard enough for West Coast (Conference) baseball,” said Larsen, whose heater once topped out at 92 mph prior to his injury in January 2017. “Coach (Rick) Vanderhook does not stress fastball velocity. He is more concerned that our pitchers throw at a velocity that makes you more efficient in locating the fastball,” Larsen said. “I am still getting stronger as I missed a lot of training time for rehabbing from Tommy John, but am still looking to gain some velocity, as all pitchers are, and am going to keep getting stronger. But for now I am happy with the velocity that I am at right now.”
21 Mar 19
SCNG
We hear about the “Tommy John” operation so frequently in the sports news that it almost measures up to traditional statistics such as batting average and ERA. But the reality of the arm surgery is daunting, and the recovery, rehabilitation and return to the field, especially for a pitcher, are never guaranteed for success. For Cal State Fullerton right-handed pitcher Evan Larsen, a red-shirt freshman who graduated from Corona del Mar High in 2016, it is a dream finally coming true. Larsen, a two-time Pacific Coast League Pitcher of the Year for the Sea Kings, underwent Tommy John surgery in April 2017 and made his long-awaited collegiate pitching debut last month. “I am ecstatic to be back out on the mound competing again,” said Larsen, who grew up rooting for the Titans and “wanted to play for Cal State Fullerton ever since I was 12. For that to be taken away from me for two years and to get that back and just to be around the guys, first and foremost before being able to compete, has been very special for both my family and I.” The 6-foot-4 Larsen started 2019 in the Titans’ bullpen and has appeared in three games, striking out four in six innings. “I have shown I can start, be a set-up guy, and close, so I feel I provide a range of flexibility and can be used however they want to use me,” Larsen said. Two weeks after his surgery, Larsen began a careful rehab process and slowly built up strength in his wrist and forearm, adding numbers to the reps in physical therapy about every two weeks. Larsen worked with longtime former Angel trainer Ned Bergert at Select Physical Therapy for about two months and finished with a 10-month stint at Sports Medicine Institute before being cleared to take the mound again. “My rehab process took a full year, but I was not cleared to throw in games until I was at 18 months post operation, which is what my coaching and training staff at Fullerton agreed on with my doctor, just to give myself extra recovery time so that way nothing went wrong,” Larsen said. “Typically for pitchers it is recommended to wait longer and that way the chances of re-injuring go down the longer you wait and since we had plenty of pitching and I was able to utilize a red shirt and a medical red shirt, thankfully I was able to take my time in rehabbing my elbow.” Larsen started a throwing program four months after surgery, and it required a few more months to get his mechanics together and “regenerating the muscle memory of throwing,” Larsen said. Larsen was instructed not to pitch summer ball in 2018, and instead continued to focus on working out at a Costa Mesa facility with his trainer, Josh Reidt. “I started throwing again slowly in July until getting back on campus in August and then I would face live batters for the first time in October of 2018,” said Larsen, whose fastball is touching 91 mph, setting up his two-seam fastball, 12-6 curveball and change-up. “My fastball is nothing eye-popping, but it sits around 90 to 91 if I am feeling good, but typically can sit around 88 to 90, which is hard enough for West Coast (Conference) baseball,” said Larsen, whose heater once topped out at 92 mph prior to his injury in January 2017. “Coach (Rick) Vanderhook does not stress fastball velocity. He is more concerned that our pitchers throw at a velocity that makes you more efficient in locating the fastball,” Larsen said. “I am still getting stronger as I missed a lot of training time for rehabbing from Tommy John, but am still looking to gain some velocity, as all pitchers are, and am going to keep getting stronger. But for now I am happy with the velocity that I am at right now.”
21 Mar 19
Nachrichten Welt

(KMAland) – Das NCAA-Turnier begann am Dienstag, und gestern haben sie auch ein paar Spiele gespielt. Der eigentliche Spaß beginnt jedoch heute, wenn vier Spiele auf einmal ungefähr 12 Stunden laufen. Nur eine kurze Anmerkung: Als ich erwachsen wurde, war CBS der einzige Kanal, der Spiele trug. Und wir waren unserer Region ausgeliefert. Hin und […]

20 Mar 19
Santa Cruz Sentinel
Summer-Solstice Thomas fared better than perhaps any other athlete from Santa Cruz County in college winter sports’ postseason. The Santa Cruz High graduate achieved All-American status at the NCAA Division III indoor track and field championships in Boston on March 9, helping Williams College of Massachusetts earn a national title. Thomas finished fifth points-wise in the five-event pentathlon, posting personal-best marks in two events – the 800 meters (2 minutes, 2.22 seconds), in which she placed fourth, and the shot put (30 feet, 7 inches), in which she placed 15th. Santa Cruz High alum Summer-Solstice Thomas placed fifth in the pentathlon at the NCAA Division III indoor track and field championships in Boston on March 9, 2019, helping Williams College of Massachusetts win the national title.Kelvin Hao/Williams College Thomas also placed fourth among pentathletes in the high jump, clearing the bar at approximately 5 feet, 4 inches, and the long jump, in which she leapt roughly 17-6 ¾. In her other event, the 60-meter hurdles, Thomas clocked in at 9.49 seconds. Thomas is also a New England Small College Athletic Conference All-Academic selection because she holds a cumulative GPA of at least 3.50. Santa Cruz High alum Summer-Solstice Thomas placed fifth in the pentathlon at the NCAA Division III indoor track and field championships in Boston on March 9, 2019, helping Williams College of Massachusetts win the national title.Kelvin Hao/Williams College In other winter sports news: Women’s basketball Natalie Diaz (Soquel), Dominican, Sr.: The guard scored 14 points, well below her average, in the Penguins’ season-ending loss to host UC San Diego in the NCAA Division II West Regional on Friday night. Diaz also had five rebounds, two steals and a blocked shot. Mersadis Allen (Scotts Valley), Dominican, Jr.: The forward had two points in three minutes of playing time in the Penguins’ NCAA Division II tournament loss to UC San Diego. Men’s basketball Carl Snyder (Monte Vista Christian), Fresno City College, So.: The 6-foot-9 forward scored six points, all on 3-pointers, and grabbed three rebounds last Thursday as the Rams defeated Chaffey College of Rancho Cucamonga in the state quarterfinals. Snyder didn’t fare as well in Fresno City’s semifinal loss to Fullerton College on Saturday, shooting 1-for-5 from 3-point range for his only points. In spring sports news: Baseball Fineas Del Bonta-Smith (Soquel), San Jose State, Sr.: The right-handed reliever had a big weekend against UNLV, earning his second win of the season and picking up his team-leading fourth and fifth saves as SJSU swept a three-game series from the Rebels at San Jose’s Municipal Stadium. Del Bonta-Smith pitched in the top of of the ninth inning in all three games. San Jose State trailed when he entered Friday, then rallied in the bottom of the ninth to win 2-1. He held on for his fourth save despite giving up a run Saturday, then tossed a scoreless ninth Sunday to secure the sweep. Dylan McPhillips (Monte Vista Christian), Sacramento State, So.: Seeing his first action of the season, the catcher went 2-for-3 with a double and scored a run as the Hornets defeated visiting Rider 7-0 on Sunday. Sahid Valenzuela (St. Francis), Cal State Fullerton, Jr.: The shortstop went 3-for-9 at the plate as the Titans dropped two of three in last weekend’s home series against James Madison. In the series’ final game Sunday, Valenzuela drove in a run with a sacrifice fly and scored another after being hit by a pitch, helping CSUF win 12-3. Valenzuela still ranks second on the Titans in batting average among players with 50 or more at bats, hitting .371 with 10 RBIs. Chase Watkins (St. Francis), Cal Poly-San Luis Obispo, Fr.: The left-handed pitcher struck out four batters, walked two, and allowed just one earned run in 2 1/3 innings for the Mustangs against Pepperdine on March 12. Through Wednesday he was 0-1 with eight strikeouts, nine walks and a 4.26 ERA in 6 1/3 innings. Jonah Gonzales (Aptos), San Francisco State, Redshirt Jr.: In the lineup mostly as a designated hitter, he repeatedly came through for the Gators at the plate as they took three of four from host Cal Poly-Pomona over the weekend. In his best game of the series, the nightcap of a Saturday doubleheader, Gonzales went 3-for-5 with an RBI, a stolen base and a run scored as SFSU won 7-5 in nine innings. He was 1-for-4 with an RBI, a stolen base and a run scored in San Francisco State’s 8-2 win on Friday, and also scored a run in the Gators’ loss Sunday. Jack Harris (Aptos), San Francisco State, Jr.: Like Gonzales, his former Aptos High teammate, the outfielder excelled at the plate over the weekend against Cal Poly-Pomona. Harris went 2-for-5 with a double and an RBI in the nightcap of Saturday’s doubleheader and belted a solo home run in Sunday’s loss. Ian Blair (San Lorenzo Valley), Pacific (Ore.), So.: The right fielder had two hits, scored a run and drove in another in the second half of a doubleheader Saturday, helping the Boxers complete a sweep of visiting Whitman. Tanner Murray (San Lorenzo Valley), UC Davis, So.: The shortstop doubled in the Aggies’ 11-9 loss to the University of the Pacific on March 13. Murray currently leads UC Davis in batting average (.379), hits (22) and doubles (seven) and is tied for second on the team in RBIs (11). Ryan Gallegos (Scotts Valley), Biola, So.: The first baseman struggled at the plate in a four-game series at Point Loma, going 1-for-14 as the Eagles dropped three of four. Softball Bailey Lotz (San Lorenzo Valley), St. Mary’s, Sr.: Batting in the cleanup spot, the first baseman performed solidly at the plate in last weekend’s St. Mary’s Tournament. Lotz went 2-for-4 with an RBI and a run scored in St. Mary’s 6-4 loss to Manhattan on Sunday. She also had three hits and one RBI in St. Mary’s 6-1 victory over Bucknell on Saturday. On Friday, Lotz had two hits and scored twice in the Gaels’ 8-0 win over Manhattan, then scored one of St. Mary’s two runs in its 2-1 win over Bucknell. Sarah Reyes (Scotts Valley), Menlo College, Sr.: The pitcher/infielder had a rough go of things Friday as Hope International swept a doubleheader from the Oaks. Batting cleanup in the opener, she went 0-for-3 at the plate, though she did drive in a run in Menlo’s 13-4, five-inning loss. In the nightcap, Reyes entered the pitcher’s circle and surrendered six earned runs in 3 1/3 innings as to suffer her sixth loss of the season. Women’s beach volleyball Madison Dueck (Aptos), Cal, Jr.: Paired with sophomore Alexia Inman, she went 3-2 at last weekend’s Heineken Hawaii Invitational, helping the 11th-ranked Golden Bears place second in the tournament. Dueck and Inman earned straight-set victories against Nebraska on Saturday and against Boise State on both Saturday and Sunday. The one team they couldn’t get past was sixth-ranked Hawai’i, whose No. 4 tandem twice beat Dueck and Inman in three sets. Both times Dueck and Inman pushed the third set to extra points before succumbing to the Rainbow Wahines, including in the championship duel. Sjea Anderson (Monte Vista Christian), Cal Poly-SLO, So.: Paired with Heather Pembroke in the Mustangs’ No. 5 spot, she lost a three-set match against fifth-ranked Pepperdine last Wednesday at Pepperdine’s Waves Invite. After losing the first set, Anderson and Pembroke rallied to win the second 21-19 before dropping a hard-fought third 15-12. Women’s water polo Hannah Henry (Soquel), SJSU, Redshirt Fr.: The goalkeeper performed well enough to help the Spartans beat 14th-ranked Princeton at last weekend’s LMU Invitational in Los Angeles. In three other matches, she at least kept things close. On Friday, the tournament’s opening day, Henry made 10 saves each in SJSU’s 11-9 victory over Princeton and a 10-9 overtime loss to No. 20 Marist. She didn’t fare as well the following day, making a combined 22 saves in losses to Bucknell and 16th-ranked Wagner. Women’s outdoor track and field Anastasia Kubicki (Santa Cruz), UC Davis, Sr.: The pole vaulter won her event Saturday at Sacramento State’s Hornet Invitational, clearing the bar at 12-7 ½. Corey Friedenbach (Pacific Collegiate), Air Force, Fr.: The pole vaulter cleared the bar at 10-11¾ to take second Saturday at the University of Colorado’s Jerry Quiller Classic. Cassie Ackemann (SLV), Southern Methodist, So.: The high jumper placed third in her event March 14 at the University of Houston’s Spring Break Invitational, clearing the bar at 5-7. Ackemann also finished 14th in the 200-meter dash with a time of 27.93. Marea Zlatunich (Aptos), Cal, Fr.: The distance runner placed seventh in the 1,500 meters at Sacramento State’s Hornet Invitational with a time of 4:24.78. Anaya Ward (Santa Cruz), UC Davis, Fr.: The distance runner placed 11th in the 1,500 at Sacramento State’s Hornet Invitational, clocking in at 4:35.78. Cara Courtney (Scotts Valley), Corban Univ. (Ore.), So.: She placed second in the triple jump with a mark of 31-11¼ last Thursday in a dual meet against host Willamette University. Men’s outdoor track and field Quinn Lydon (SLV), UC San Diego, So.: The runner finished third in the 110-meter hurdles at Saturday’s Ross and Sharon Irwin Scoring Meet in Point Loma, clocking in at 15.46. Nick Heath (Scotts Valley), Pepperdine, Sr.: The distance runner finished fourth in the 3,000 meters at Saturday’s UC Irvine Collegiate Classic in 8:44.53. Sam Schubert (SLV), Cal State Fullerton, Jr.: The runner placed ninth in the 110-meter hurdles (15.15) and 14th in the 100-meter dash (11.61) on Saturday at Arizona State’s Baldy Castillo Invitational. Matthew Founds (Soquel), Fresno State, Jr.: The distance runner finished 13th in the 5,000 at Saturday’s UNLV Spring Invitational in 15:58.56. Jake Gill (Santa Cruz), Claremont-Mudd-Scripps, Fr.: The middle-distance runner came in 15th in the 800 on Friday at the Redlands Invitational in 2:02.98. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]
20 Mar 19
Mountain West Wire

Mountain West Basketball Offseason Transfer Tracker A comprehensive list of every transfer in Mountain West basketball Contact/Follow @boettger_eli & @MWCwire Mountain West Basketball Offseason Transfer Tracker The offseason is underway for most of the Mountain West programs. Below is a list of every Mountain West basketball player that is transferring. As always, if we missed […]

20 Mar 19
Power Money Sex

NCAA Tournament Glance All Times EDT FIRST FOUR At UD Arena Dayton, Ohio Tuesday, March 19 Fairleigh Dickinson (20-13) vs. Prairie View A&M (22-12), 6:40 p.m. Belmont (26-5) vs. Temple (23-9), 9:10 p.m. Wednesday, March 20 N.C. Central (18-15) vs. North Dakota State (18-15), 6:40 p.m. Arizona State (22-10) vs. St. John’s (21-12), 9:10 p.m. […]

20 Mar 19
The Undefeated
Doc Rivers had a bittersweet family moment when the March Madness field was revealed on Sunday. He was ecstatic to learn that his youngest child, Spencer, and the University of California, Irvine will play Kansas State on Friday in the NCAA men’s basketball tournament. But he was disappointed that he wouldn’t be able to cheer on the Anteaters in person in San Jose because he’ll be coaching the Los Angeles Clippers in Cleveland that day. “I couldn’t wait for the seedings to come out because I was like, ‘We’re going to make this work,’ ” Rivers told The Undefeated. “I was hoping they played on Thursday. But when I saw they played on Friday, I was like, ‘No!’ ” “I know he wants to be there,” said Spencer Rivers, “but some things just aren’t controllable.” Spencer Rivers will be making his first NCAA tournament appearance, joining his father and older siblings who have made it onto college sports’ biggest stage. Doc Rivers starred at Marquette University from 1980-83 and made two NCAA tournament appearances. His eldest child, Jeremiah, played for the Georgetown squad that advanced to the 2007 Final Four and the second round in 2008. His daughter, Callie, was an outside hitter for Florida’s volleyball team, which went to the NCAA regional semifinal each year from 2007-10. And son Austin played on the No. 2 seed Duke team that was upset by C.J. McCollum and 15th seed Lehigh in their opening game of the 2012 NCAA tournament. “It’s amazing to think that all four of my kids have played in the NCAA tournament,” Doc Rivers said. “That is pretty cool.” If the 13th-seeded Anteaters can pull off the upset on fourth seed Kansas State, there will be added victory for Spencer. UC Irvine guard Spencer Rivers celebrates the Anteaters’ 92-64 victory over Cal State Fullerton in the finals of the Big West conference tournament at Honda Center. “My goal right now is just to beat Austin’s record. At least get one win in,” Spencer said. Austin Rivers will be rooting for that outcome too. “So proud to see him in the NCAAs,” said Austin. “Hopefully, he can win a game and advance, unlike his older bro.” Spencer’s mother, Kristen, Jeremiah and Callie plan to be at the UC Irvine game. Austin, however, will be on the road with the Houston Rockets visiting the San Antonio Spurs. Even if UC Irvine upsets Kansas State, neither Doc Rivers nor Austin would be able to make Spencer’s next potential game Sunday because they both have NBA games that day too. “As soon as the schedule came out, I was hot,” Austin said. Doc Rivers says UC Irvine is a “tough out” and he is hoping for a shocking Sweet 16 appearance so he can see his son in an NCAA game. But missing out on Spencer’s game has also made him have a stronger appreciation for the games he has been able to see his children play. Rivers has paid for expensive private jets to see his kids’ high school and college games dating to his days coaching the Boston Celtics. He said each trip was worth the effort and money since “there is no greater joy than seeing your child do well.” “One time we had a game in Portland on a Thursday and I flew on Wednesday to Florida and then flew back to Portland. And then after the Portland game I flew back to Florida and then we played the Lakers the next night on that Sunday,” Doc Rivers said. “It was brutal. But it was worth it. You slept on the plane and got a lot of work done on the plane. Then you did the game and then you crashed. But I wouldn’t take it back for the world. … Doc Rivers (second to left) along with his family. “I have fun. I don’t go there to coach them. I go to support them, be a fan, and cheer and yell. I act just like a fan would act.” Doc Rivers said he has gone to close to 10 of Spencer’s games this season, including one on a Clippers game day. On Jan. 14, 2017, he was at Staples Center in downtown Los Angeles coaching the Clippers past the Los Angeles Lakers, 113-97, in a game that started at 12:30 p.m. Afterward, he drove 45 miles to Irvine for his son’s game, which started at 5 p.m. The longtime NBA coach was also able to go to his son’s senior day this season. And perhaps best of all, he saw Spencer score two points in 15 minutes as UC Irvine defeated Cal State Fullerton in the Big West tournament championship game on March 16 to earn a spot in the NCAA tournament. His children appreciate his efforts to support them. “It meant a lot now knowing how crazy this schedule is up here in the NBA,” Austin said. “It really takes a lot of energy and, quite frankly, money to charter planes to be able to see the game and be back in time for your own game. Crazy.” Said Spencer: “The fact that he is getting on a plane, spending a whole bunch of money to come from across the country to watch me play is very much a blessing.” Spencer Rivers, right, watching his brother, Jeremiah, along with his parents back in 2013. What makes Spencer’s appearance in the NCAA tournament especially sweet for the family is the challenging road he took to get there. Spencer said he turned down some small-college scholarship offers in Florida to be closer to his father in the Los Angeles area while in college. The 6-foot-2, 200-pound point guard was a walk-on at UC Irvine’s basketball program during the 2014-15 season. He missed the entire 2017-18 season with a broken foot and strongly considered giving up college basketball. Ultimately, Spencer decided to return for his final college season. Spencer wasn’t cleared to play until about three weeks before the season started, but the decision to return paid off for the reserve guard as he earned a spot in the Anteaters’ rotation off the bench. After finally shaking off the foot injury, he has averaged 2.3 points and 17.6 minutes over the last eight games. Now he’ll get to participate in the second NCAA tournament appearance in school history. “I just figured that if I start something, I should probably finish it,” Spencer Rivers said. “I just thought I’d give it one more chance. I’m glad I did. It was awesome to make the NCAA tournament. … “I’m thrilled. This is once in a lifetime for people. I’m just trying to take advantage of it the best that I can.” And the family will cherish it, whether near or far. [newsletter-culture] “You’re always happy with all your kids,” Doc Rivers said. “But all the kids are happiest about Spencer because he’s the kid that has always been to their stuff and supported them, so it’s nice that he is able to play and help the team.” Spencer Rivers is expected to graduate from Irvine with a degree in sociology this spring. He plans to follow in his dad’s footsteps in basketball in some capacity, perhaps starting as a Clippers intern this summer. “I think I want to get into coaching,” Spencer said. “Just being around my dad and being around the sport of basketball my whole life, I want to stay around basketball, whether that is coaching, front office or becoming an agent.” It’s something his father can see happening too. Said Doc: “I’ve talked to several other guys who have coached him who have said, ‘If he doesn’t coach, something is wrong with him.’ ”
20 Mar 19
PURDUE SPORTS NATION

The champions from Conference USA have a pair of dynamic guards. I have to admit that the last few years of the NCAA Tournament have kind of broken me as a Purdue fan. I even wrote about it last year. As a fan, you build to this moment for months. The perception of your program […]