California

25 Jun 19
FOX6Now.com

[ooyala player_id=”f987944e2b8d47c5ad7da7977780b8bd” auto=”true” width=”1920″ height=”1080″ pcode=”9vOTQyOvfOKTDwM65FXm0S1biBeX” code=”gwMTkyaTE6JH-1JQBXn9jacIe9EosZSZ”] HUNTINGTON PARK, Calif. – Shocking video shows a pickup truck accelerating wildly as it circled around a Huntington Park intersection and slammed into parked vehicles over the weekend; officials said Monday they’re investigating the incident. Only the driver of the pickup was injured after the series of collisions […]

25 Jun 19
TobyChristie.com

A concerning trend continued Sunday at Sonoma Raceway, as Cody Ware — who drives the No. 52 Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 for Rick Ware Racing — suffered from carbon monoxide poisoning in the Toyota Save Mart 350. Ware had to retire from the race after 64 laps around the 2.52-mile road course in California after symptoms […]

25 Jun 19
SheKnows
As Fuller House heads into its final season, there will be some big things to handle; closing out a series that has been on and off for 30 years won’t be easy. One of the trickiest things facing the cast and crew of Fuller House is Lori Loughlin’s exit will be handled. Loughlin’s longtime co-star and TV husband John Stamos is now sensitively weighing in on this tough situation. Speaking with Entertainment Tonight, Stamos offered what he could about where things stand with Loughlin and Fuller House as of now. Stamos said he’s still trying to “figure out” how Loughlin’s Fuller House absence will be explained, telling ET, “I haven’t been on the show yet and it hasn’t come up, so I’m going to talk to some people about it this week and see what’s going on. I’m just going to wait a little longer before I talk about it. It’s a difficult situation for everyone involved. I don’t mean just on our side.” Stamos, who is a producer on the final season, did offer a tease about the story which could indicate how the show will pull as much focus as possible away from Loughlin’s absence: “I’m on some of [the episodes] but it’s become a girls show and I think a lot of the storylines will be around them.” Image: Netflix. Following Loughlin’s arrest for her alleged involvement in the college admissions scandal in March, the actress has gone mostly underground. Facing decades in prison for money laundering and allegedly working with her husband, Mossimo Giannulli, to pay approximately $50,000 in bribes to get their two daughters into the University of Southern of California Loughlin’s legal woes have led to her recent departure from her two main acting gigs. In addition to Fuller House confirming Loughlin wouldn’t be returning for the final season, the Hallmark Channel also parted ways with Loughlin in the wake of her arrest. Loughlin’s Fuller House co-stars have expressed sympathy and support for her in recent months. Fuller House now faces the unenviable task of tackling how to explain away the absence of one it’s most well-known stars and lead characters who has been integral to the series since it first premiered back in 1987.
25 Jun 19
Site Title

Do you need to know Jennifer Freeman’s Age and Birthday date? Jennifer Freeman was born on 20 october, 1985 in California.
How old is this celebrity? And what are his/her social media accounts?…

25 Jun 19
NEON MOON

    In case you haven’t heard, we’re trekking out West to enjoy some southern California sunshine! This will be our last hometown show in Nashville for a while, so we hope to see you there!

25 Jun 19
Mondoweiss

Leading Middle East and Islamic studies scholars call on President Trump immediately to pull back from the brink of a war with the Islamic Republic of Iran: “It is clear to us that the human, diplomatic, legal, political, and economic costs to both countries, the Persian Gulf and larger Middle East, the global economy and the global system of international humanitarian law of a US attack would be even more devastating than was the US invasion of Iraq sixteen years ago.”

25 Jun 19
East Bay Times
By Carmen George | Mcclatchy CLOVIS, Calif. — Seven-year-old Annie Ta really likes her new bedroom. She excitedly invited some recent visitors to check it out as soon as they opened the front door to her family’s new home in Clovis. The house is a significant milestone in her young life, promising more stability following seven months of displacement after the Camp Fire destroyed her family’s home in Paradise. It was among more than 13,000 homes to burn in the Northern California wildfire that killed 85 people in November. The Clovis couple who sold Annie’s family their new home were happy to sell it fully-furnished. The buyers and sellers both called that a blessing. Mikhai Ta plays his cello for his family, one of the few items taken when the family evacuated from their home in Paradise. (Craig Kohlruss/Fresno Bee/TNS) Mikhai Ta and Stephanie Fritz-Ta were eager to get their daughters, Annie and 9-year-old Ellie Ta, settled back into a normal life as quickly as possible. Bob and Sue Dowell were downsizing, moving from their four-bedroom home in Monte Verdi Estates near Friant to an apartment at The Terraces at San Joaquin Gardens, a senior living community in Fresno. “I actually said, ‘Wouldn’t it just be a prayer answered if someone came and said, ‘I love it and I love everything in it and want to buy everything,’ ” Sue Dowell said. “And that’s what happened.” Their realtor, Joe Sciarrone, shared a story about the sale on his Facebook page. “In the end, we ended up selling the house fully-furnished, right down to the TVs, washer/dryer, fridge, most everything in the kitchen drawers, pictures on the walls, even Christmas decorations!” Sciarrone said. “It was as move-in ready as a house can get. The buyers were ecstatic, and the sellers relieved and happy to have helped this young couple start the next chapter of their family’s life. “There were tears shed on both sides for two entirely different reasons. One side sad for having to leave the home that had helped raise a family. The other, happy tears for all the obvious reasons. They now had a new place to call home.” Mikhai and Stephanie decided to buy the house this spring, four days after it was listed for sale. The family moved in completely last week, after Ellie and Annie finished their school year in Chico. The girls will start second and fourth grades this fall at Fresno Adventist Academy. Surviving the wildfire The family’s pets were acting noticeably different the morning the Camp Fire started. Princess the cat’s tail was bushy with fright, and Fluffy the dog was barking. Stephanie looks back on that now with pride, calling Fluffy her “Lassie,” the rescue dog. Stephanie noticed a smoky, orange sky soon after. New to the area, she thought it could have been a volcano eruption at first. Teachers at Ellie and Annie’s school informed her of the wildfire later that morning. School was canceled that day. Stephanie said the teachers looked afraid. It was enough to convince her they needed to leave. Stephanie and Mikhai, who was home from his work as a dentist, loaded their daughters and pets into the car, along with some important documents and Mikhai’s favorite cello, and left Paradise before anyone told them they should. Unfamiliar with wildfire evacuation protocol in the area, they were among the first to leave Paradise and yet they got out just in time. “It was really scary for a lot of people,” Stephanie said. “We feel almost too lucky that we didn’t go through that. … We felt like we were being overly cautious but it ended up that we weren’t being overly cautious.” The family had recently moved to Paradise from Washington. They’d only been in their new home for three and a half weeks, not even long enough to swim in their swimming pool for the first time. Of all they lost to fire, they miss their collection of beloved musical instruments most of all. Their house burned but a detached garage survived. It fortunately contained some important family mementos, including old letters and Mikhai and Stephanie’s wedding photos. ‘We’re excited to call this home’ The Adventist Health clinic in Paradise where Mikhai worked was also destroyed. Mikhai got a job offer early this year at a new Adventist Health Medical Office in Fowler that opened this month, which brought the family to Clovis. Mikhai said that “we’re excited to call this home.” The family previously lived out of hotel rooms before getting a rental. Homeowner’s insurance helped pay for their new home. They love their nice new neighbors, proximity to outdoor adventures in the Sierra Nevada, and central location for visiting other family members. They’re hosting a family reunion next month. They also love the green belt behind the house and their home’s Mediterranean style, with high ceilings, archways, artistic touches and lots of natural light. Plus, Ellie says, “Fluffy has way more room in the backyard.” [related_articles location=”right” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]Their home in Paradise was “beautiful but almost too big,” Stephanie said. She and her husband said the wildfire helped them simplify their lives and focus more on what matters most. “Relationships with your family and friends are more important than material things,” Stephanie said. “And even if those things are gone, you still have what matters most.” Sue and Bob Dowell wish them every happiness in their former home of 17 years. “We loved it there,” Sue Dowell said. “It was a beautiful neighborhood. I truly hope that they enjoy it as much as we did and are as happy there as we were.”
25 Jun 19
Jason Apparicio Surf Academy

This is Ocean Gittens going hard on his first day with his new weapon from Crowd Control surfboards. Look out for this kid and Warren Povey in the event which starts on Wednesday 26th June as we  will keep you posted on the blog. We are currently on a road trip heading to San Diego […]

25 Jun 19
The Mercury News
By Carmen George | Mcclatchy CLOVIS, Calif. — Seven-year-old Annie Ta really likes her new bedroom. She excitedly invited some recent visitors to check it out as soon as they opened the front door to her family’s new home in Clovis. The house is a significant milestone in her young life, promising more stability following seven months of displacement after the Camp Fire destroyed her family’s home in Paradise. It was among more than 13,000 homes to burn in the Northern California wildfire that killed 85 people in November. The Clovis couple who sold Annie’s family their new home were happy to sell it fully-furnished. The buyers and sellers both called that a blessing. Mikhai Ta plays his cello for his family, one of the few items taken when the family evacuated from their home in Paradise. (Craig Kohlruss/Fresno Bee/TNS) Mikhai Ta and Stephanie Fritz-Ta were eager to get their daughters, Annie and 9-year-old Ellie Ta, settled back into a normal life as quickly as possible. Bob and Sue Dowell were downsizing, moving from their four-bedroom home in Monte Verdi Estates near Friant to an apartment at The Terraces at San Joaquin Gardens, a senior living community in Fresno. “I actually said, ‘Wouldn’t it just be a prayer answered if someone came and said, ‘I love it and I love everything in it and want to buy everything,’ ” Sue Dowell said. “And that’s what happened.” Their realtor, Joe Sciarrone, shared a story about the sale on his Facebook page. “In the end, we ended up selling the house fully-furnished, right down to the TVs, washer/dryer, fridge, most everything in the kitchen drawers, pictures on the walls, even Christmas decorations!” Sciarrone said. “It was as move-in ready as a house can get. The buyers were ecstatic, and the sellers relieved and happy to have helped this young couple start the next chapter of their family’s life. “There were tears shed on both sides for two entirely different reasons. One side sad for having to leave the home that had helped raise a family. The other, happy tears for all the obvious reasons. They now had a new place to call home.” Mikhai and Stephanie decided to buy the house this spring, four days after it was listed for sale. The family moved in completely last week, after Ellie and Annie finished their school year in Chico. The girls will start second and fourth grades this fall at Fresno Adventist Academy. Surviving the wildfire The family’s pets were acting noticeably different the morning the Camp Fire started. Princess the cat’s tail was bushy with fright, and Fluffy the dog was barking. Stephanie looks back on that now with pride, calling Fluffy her “Lassie,” the rescue dog. Stephanie noticed a smoky, orange sky soon after. New to the area, she thought it could have been a volcano eruption at first. Teachers at Ellie and Annie’s school informed her of the wildfire later that morning. School was canceled that day. Stephanie said the teachers looked afraid. It was enough to convince her they needed to leave. Stephanie and Mikhai, who was home from his work as a dentist, loaded their daughters and pets into the car, along with some important documents and Mikhai’s favorite cello, and left Paradise before anyone told them they should. Unfamiliar with wildfire evacuation protocol in the area, they were among the first to leave Paradise and yet they got out just in time. “It was really scary for a lot of people,” Stephanie said. “We feel almost too lucky that we didn’t go through that. … We felt like we were being overly cautious but it ended up that we weren’t being overly cautious.” The family had recently moved to Paradise from Washington. They’d only been in their new home for three and a half weeks, not even long enough to swim in their swimming pool for the first time. Of all they lost to fire, they miss their collection of beloved musical instruments most of all. Their house burned but a detached garage survived. It fortunately contained some important family mementos, including old letters and Mikhai and Stephanie’s wedding photos. ‘We’re excited to call this home’ The Adventist Health clinic in Paradise where Mikhai worked was also destroyed. Mikhai got a job offer early this year at a new Adventist Health Medical Office in Fowler that opened this month, which brought the family to Clovis. Mikhai said that “we’re excited to call this home.” The family previously lived out of hotel rooms before getting a rental. Homeowner’s insurance helped pay for their new home. They love their nice new neighbors, proximity to outdoor adventures in the Sierra Nevada, and central location for visiting other family members. They’re hosting a family reunion next month. They also love the green belt behind the house and their home’s Mediterranean style, with high ceilings, archways, artistic touches and lots of natural light. Plus, Ellie says, “Fluffy has way more room in the backyard.” [related_articles location=”right” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]Their home in Paradise was “beautiful but almost too big,” Stephanie said. She and her husband said the wildfire helped them simplify their lives and focus more on what matters most. “Relationships with your family and friends are more important than material things,” Stephanie said. “And even if those things are gone, you still have what matters most.” Sue and Bob Dowell wish them every happiness in their former home of 17 years. “We loved it there,” Sue Dowell said. “It was a beautiful neighborhood. I truly hope that they enjoy it as much as we did and are as happy there as we were.”
25 Jun 19
Hanap Buhay Philippines

Reporting directly to the General Manager of Cold Storage, the Lead Refrigeration Operator monitors, maintains, and operates an ammonia refrigeration system. This role is responsible for application of SO2 fumigation to incoming fruit as well as fruit previously placed in the cold storage facility. Responsibilities:

  • Maintain process safety and regulatory compliance (CUPA, USEPA, OSHA, IIAR)
  • Initiate emergency response (OSHA, CUPA, PECO, AAE, etc…)
  • Coordinate contracted work (CalCA, PECO, AAE, etc.…)
  • Act as purchasing agent for parts, equipment, water treatment chemicals, fumigation product, large repairs, and facility additions.
  • Job planning and assessments – set, adjust, and assign recommendations, supervise and evaluate operators' work
  • Act as training facilitator for all facility training, recruiting 3rd party outside training for fire safety, APR testing, and hazardous work operations and emergency respon