California Dmv

16 Jun 19
Redlands Daily Facts
Q: To save money and time, Corona resident John Bice suggested that the California Department of Motor Vehicles could issue licenses for 10 years or more, with exceptions perhaps for first-time and/or elderly drivers. “The state knows who is getting tickets and what kind of ticket, and can deal with those drivers. Arizona issues licenses good to age 65, with a new picture every 12 years. Imagine how the crowds at the DMV would shrink,” said Bice, who also noted that revenue to the state would decline if the driver’s license term were to be longer. Is such an extension possible in California? A: The length for the California driver’s license term isn’t something the DMV decides, as extending the term for California drivers would require action by the state Legislature, DMV spokesman Marty Greenstein said. “I know there have been proposed bills in the past but nothing that has been enacted,” Greenstein said, noting that the term for a license changed from four years to five effective in 1997. California Vehicle Code Section 12816(a) says that most California driver licenses are good for five years and expire on the driver’s birthday. There are instances in which a license can expire in a shorter time period, however. It states, “Every original driver’s license expires on the fifth birthday of the applicant following the date of the application for the license. (b) Renewal of a driver’s license shall be made for a term which expires on the fifth birthday of the applicant following the expiration of the license renewed, if application for renewal is made within six months prior to the expiration of the license to be renewed, or within 90 days after expiration of the license.” There is no grace period for driving on an expired license. You can’t drive on an expired license pending your scheduled DMV appointment. Our reader could write his local state Senate or Assembly member and ask them to sponsor a bill seeking to extend the driver’s license term. How long a driver’s license is valid until a renewal is required varies from state to state. As our reader noted, a license issued by Arizona is good until age 65 – this is unique – and  then a renewal is required every five years. Many states have terms equal or similar to California’s, while several other states have license terms longer than California’s for most drivers. These include some that offer a license for eight years (in most cases): Florida, Hawaii, Arkansas, Delaware, New York, Oregon, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, Georgia and Wisconsin. Some states have shorter terms for new or older drivers. Visit the AAA Digest of Motor Laws website —https://drivinglaws.aaa.com/tag/drivers-license-renewal/ — to see the full list. Protecting registration tags We’d like to share a tip from reader Benjamin Adams in response to our recent discussion about how to protect your vehicle registration tags from thieves. As we noted, stealing registration tags from another vehicle is happening quite a bit in California these days. The DMV lets drivers cut score marks into the tags to make it harder for them to be stolen. Adams noted that some people just apply their new registration tag on top of a pile of old, expired tags. He advised that it’s best to first remove the raised pile of old tags. “It is a bit of a chore, but a thief can cut a couple layers back and preserve the top layer and even a scored tag will come off unscathed,” Adams said. Electric vehicles Finally, do you think lots of Americans are interested in electric vehicles? You get great mileage and you never have to get gas again, right? Well … wrong, at least sort of. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] The Automobile Club of Southern California recently released the results of its study asking why Americans are not as interested in the vehicles as some assumed they would be. The survey showed that despite a fair amount of interest in them, only four in 10 respondents said they think most vehicles would be electric by 2029. “AAA believes that like other emerging technologies, a lack of knowledge and experience may be contributing to the slow adoption of electric vehicles despite Americans’ desire to go green,” the Auto Club concluded. More than 200,000 electric vehicles are on the nation’s roads today, according to Greg Brannon, AAA’s director of Automotive Engineering and Industry Relations. AAA found that 40 million Americans are at least open to considering getting a electric vehicle the next time they buy a car, with millennials being most open to the idea. Do you commute to work in the Inland Empire? Spend a lot of time in your vehicle? Have questions about driving, freeways, toll roads or parking? If so, write or call On the Road and we’ll try to answer your questions. Please include your question or issue, name, city of residence, phone number and email address. Write ontheroad@pe.com or call 951-368-9670.
16 Jun 19
Daily Bulletin
Q: To save money and time, Corona resident John Bice suggested that the California Department of Motor Vehicles could issue licenses for 10 years or more, with exceptions perhaps for first-time and/or elderly drivers. “The state knows who is getting tickets and what kind of ticket, and can deal with those drivers. Arizona issues licenses good to age 65, with a new picture every 12 years. Imagine how the crowds at the DMV would shrink,” said Bice, who also noted that revenue to the state would decline if the driver’s license term were to be longer. Is such an extension possible in California? A: The length for the California driver’s license term isn’t something the DMV decides, as extending the term for California drivers would require action by the state Legislature, DMV spokesman Marty Greenstein said. “I know there have been proposed bills in the past but nothing that has been enacted,” Greenstein said, noting that the term for a license changed from four years to five effective in 1997. California Vehicle Code Section 12816(a) says that most California driver licenses are good for five years and expire on the driver’s birthday. There are instances in which a license can expire in a shorter time period, however. It states, “Every original driver’s license expires on the fifth birthday of the applicant following the date of the application for the license. (b) Renewal of a driver’s license shall be made for a term which expires on the fifth birthday of the applicant following the expiration of the license renewed, if application for renewal is made within six months prior to the expiration of the license to be renewed, or within 90 days after expiration of the license.” There is no grace period for driving on an expired license. You can’t drive on an expired license pending your scheduled DMV appointment. Our reader could write his local state Senate or Assembly member and ask them to sponsor a bill seeking to extend the driver’s license term. How long a driver’s license is valid until a renewal is required varies from state to state. As our reader noted, a license issued by Arizona is good until age 65 – this is unique – and  then a renewal is required every five years. Many states have terms equal or similar to California’s, while several other states have license terms longer than California’s for most drivers. These include some that offer a license for eight years (in most cases): Florida, Hawaii, Arkansas, Delaware, New York, Oregon, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, Georgia and Wisconsin. Some states have shorter terms for new or older drivers. Visit the AAA Digest of Motor Laws website —https://drivinglaws.aaa.com/tag/drivers-license-renewal/ — to see the full list. Protecting registration tags We’d like to share a tip from reader Benjamin Adams in response to our recent discussion about how to protect your vehicle registration tags from thieves. As we noted, stealing registration tags from another vehicle is happening quite a bit in California these days. The DMV lets drivers cut score marks into the tags to make it harder for them to be stolen. Adams noted that some people just apply their new registration tag on top of a pile of old, expired tags. He advised that it’s best to first remove the raised pile of old tags. “It is a bit of a chore, but a thief can cut a couple layers back and preserve the top layer and even a scored tag will come off unscathed,” Adams said. Electric vehicles Finally, do you think lots of Americans are interested in electric vehicles? You get great mileage and you never have to get gas again, right? Well … wrong, at least sort of. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] The Automobile Club of Southern California recently released the results of its study asking why Americans are not as interested in the vehicles as some assumed they would be. The survey showed that despite a fair amount of interest in them, only four in 10 respondents said they think most vehicles would be electric by 2029. “AAA believes that like other emerging technologies, a lack of knowledge and experience may be contributing to the slow adoption of electric vehicles despite Americans’ desire to go green,” the Auto Club concluded. More than 200,000 electric vehicles are on the nation’s roads today, according to Greg Brannon, AAA’s director of Automotive Engineering and Industry Relations. AAA found that 40 million Americans are at least open to considering getting a electric vehicle the next time they buy a car, with millennials being most open to the idea. Do you commute to work in the Inland Empire? Spend a lot of time in your vehicle? Have questions about driving, freeways, toll roads or parking? If so, write or call On the Road and we’ll try to answer your questions. Please include your question or issue, name, city of residence, phone number and email address. Write ontheroad@pe.com or call 951-368-9670.
16 Jun 19
Press Enterprise
Q: To save money and time, Corona resident John Bice suggested that the California Department of Motor Vehicles could issue licenses for 10 years or more, with exceptions perhaps for first-time and/or elderly drivers. “The state knows who is getting tickets and what kind of ticket, and can deal with those drivers. Arizona issues licenses good to age 65, with a new picture every 12 years. Imagine how the crowds at the DMV would shrink,” said Bice, who also noted that revenue to the state would decline if the driver’s license term were to be longer. Is such an extension possible in California? A: The length for the California driver’s license term isn’t something the DMV decides, as extending the term for California drivers would require action by the state Legislature, DMV spokesman Marty Greenstein said. “I know there have been proposed bills in the past but nothing that has been enacted,” Greenstein said, noting that the term for a license changed from four years to five effective in 1997. California Vehicle Code Section 12816(a) says that most California driver licenses are good for five years and expire on the driver’s birthday. There are instances in which a license can expire in a shorter time period, however. It states, “Every original driver’s license expires on the fifth birthday of the applicant following the date of the application for the license. (b) Renewal of a driver’s license shall be made for a term which expires on the fifth birthday of the applicant following the expiration of the license renewed, if application for renewal is made within six months prior to the expiration of the license to be renewed, or within 90 days after expiration of the license.” There is no grace period for driving on an expired license. You can’t drive on an expired license pending your scheduled DMV appointment. Our reader could write his local state Senate or Assembly member and ask them to sponsor a bill seeking to extend the driver’s license term. How long a driver’s license is valid until a renewal is required varies from state to state. As our reader noted, a license issued by Arizona is good until age 65 – this is unique – and  then a renewal is required every five years. Many states have terms equal or similar to California’s, while several other states have license terms longer than California’s for most drivers. These include some that offer a license for eight years (in most cases): Florida, Hawaii, Arkansas, Delaware, New York, Oregon, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, Georgia and Wisconsin. Some states have shorter terms for new or older drivers. Visit the AAA Digest of Motor Laws website —https://drivinglaws.aaa.com/tag/drivers-license-renewal/ — to see the full list. Protecting registration tags We’d like to share a tip from reader Benjamin Adams in response to our recent discussion about how to protect your vehicle registration tags from thieves. As we noted, stealing registration tags from another vehicle is happening quite a bit in California these days. The DMV lets drivers cut score marks into the tags to make it harder for them to be stolen. Adams noted that some people just apply their new registration tag on top of a pile of old, expired tags. He advised that it’s best to first remove the raised pile of old tags. “It is a bit of a chore, but a thief can cut a couple layers back and preserve the top layer and even a scored tag will come off unscathed,” Adams said. Electric vehicles Finally, do you think lots of Americans are interested in electric vehicles? You get great mileage and you never have to get gas again, right? Well … wrong, at least sort of. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] The Automobile Club of Southern California recently released the results of its study asking why Americans are not as interested in the vehicles as some assumed they would be. The survey showed that despite a fair amount of interest in them, only four in 10 respondents said they think most vehicles would be electric by 2029. “AAA believes that like other emerging technologies, a lack of knowledge and experience may be contributing to the slow adoption of electric vehicles despite Americans’ desire to go green,” the Auto Club concluded. More than 200,000 electric vehicles are on the nation’s roads today, according to Greg Brannon, AAA’s director of Automotive Engineering and Industry Relations. AAA found that 40 million Americans are at least open to considering getting a electric vehicle the next time they buy a car, with millennials being most open to the idea. Do you commute to work in the Inland Empire? Spend a lot of time in your vehicle? Have questions about driving, freeways, toll roads or parking? If so, write or call On the Road and we’ll try to answer your questions. Please include your question or issue, name, city of residence, phone number and email address. Write ontheroad@pe.com or call 951-368-9670.
16 Jun 19
BravoDollar.com

After a serious traffic violation conviction — and likely driver’s license suspension — the California Department of Motor Vehicles (CA DMV) will require you to purchase car insurance with an SR-22 filing requirement. This filing requirement is around $25, but the car insurance premiums themselves are more expensive than basic auto coverage premiums. Most drivers […]

15 Jun 19
BravoDollar.com

A driver who resides in New York State and is in need of affordable car insurance can best start by comparing rates among different providers. This article will explain why rates differ, how your own life situation affects prices, and how to find the lowest cost auto insurance companies in New York State. Cheapest Car […]

15 Jun 19
Sheilas Legal and DMV Vehicle Service

hearings checklists Initial / Detention Detention Hearing Checklist:Child’s Attorney . . . . . Detention Hearing Checklist:Parent’s Attorney . . . . Jurisdiction Jurisdiction Hearing Checklist:Child’s Attorney . . . . Jurisdiction Hearing Checklist:Parent’s Attorney . . . Disposition Disposition Hearing Checklist:Child’s Attorney . . . . Disposition Hearing Checklist:Parent’s Attorney . . . . […]

14 Jun 19
Daily News
Re “Your tax dollars at work as cities shut traffic lanes” (Opinion, June 2): I really enjoyed reading Steven Greenhut’s article, but he needs to go a little farther. The reason that bill was passed was because of the description given in the voter’s ballot. We need someone who can read over the descriptions of ballots before they go to the press so they are not ambiguous. In the case of the gasoline and DMV bill, if you wanted to vote against the bill, you voted yes. If you wanted the bill, you voted no. Just the reverse of how it should have read. Californians are either too busy or too lazy to read the entire bills or even the arguments for and against so they go by the wording in the ballot description. In this case, no one wanted the bill to pass, so they voted no, and the bill passed. Someone with a little power should look into this practice. — Larry Ellis, Monrovia Fix immigration laws Re “For California, census case is Supreme Court’s biggest” (Opinion, May 24): Having read Tom Elias’ column, I think he is among many in California that suffers from TDS: Trump Derangement Syndrome. Elias states that placing a question about citizenship on the ballot for the 2020 census might result in untold numbers of undocumented immigrants not getting counted. This, in turn, might mean California would lose billions of dollars in federal funds based on population count. Well, with the United States currently $22 trillion in debt and counting, one might ask how can we be doling out federal funds to cover millions of immigrants who have no right to be here in the first place. We can’t have it both ways — open borders and billions of dollars in benefits. Way past time to adjust our immigration laws to reflect the current situation on our borders. — Thomas Jebb, Camarillo Contact your legislators Re “With Senate Bill 50 on hold, here are some alternatives” (Opinion, June 7): Thomas Elias’ article is important to us all. The state Legislature is running roughshod over us all with Senate Bill 50, SB 330 and Assembly Bill 1763. These bills will take away from so much from so many people. They should not be passed. Please urge your readers to call, email or write their representatives and the governor, asking them to just say no. — Chris Dreike, Torrance
14 Jun 19
Whittier Daily News
Re “Your tax dollars at work as cities shut traffic lanes” (Opinion, June 2): I really enjoyed reading Steven Greenhut’s article, but he needs to go a little farther. The reason that bill was passed was because of the description given in the voter’s ballot. We need someone who can read over the descriptions of ballots before they go to the press so they are not ambiguous. In the case of the gasoline and DMV bill, if you wanted to vote against the bill, you voted yes. If you wanted the bill, you voted no. Just the reverse of how it should have read. Californians are either too busy or too lazy to read the entire bills or even the arguments for and against so they go by the wording in the ballot description. In this case, no one wanted the bill to pass, so they voted no, and the bill passed. Someone with a little power should look into this practice. — Larry Ellis, Monrovia Fix immigration laws Re “For California, census case is Supreme Court’s biggest” (Opinion, May 24): Having read Tom Elias’ column, I think he is among many in California that suffers from TDS: Trump Derangement Syndrome. Elias states that placing a question about citizenship on the ballot for the 2020 census might result in untold numbers of undocumented immigrants not getting counted. This, in turn, might mean California would lose billions of dollars in federal funds based on population count. Well, with the United States currently $22 trillion in debt and counting, one might ask how can we be doling out federal funds to cover millions of immigrants who have no right to be here in the first place. We can’t have it both ways — open borders and billions of dollars in benefits. Way past time to adjust our immigration laws to reflect the current situation on our borders. — Thomas Jebb, Camarillo Contact your legislators Re “With Senate Bill 50 on hold, here are some alternatives” (Opinion, June 7): Thomas Elias’ article is important to us all. The state Legislature is running roughshod over us all with Senate Bill 50, SB 330 and Assembly Bill 1763. These bills will take away from so much from so many people. They should not be passed. Please urge your readers to call, email or write their representatives and the governor, asking them to just say no. — Chris Dreike, Torrance
14 Jun 19
Pasadena Star News
Re “Your tax dollars at work as cities shut traffic lanes” (Opinion, June 2): I really enjoyed reading Steven Greenhut’s article, but he needs to go a little farther. The reason that bill was passed was because of the description given in the voter’s ballot. We need someone who can read over the descriptions of ballots before they go to the press so they are not ambiguous. In the case of the gasoline and DMV bill, if you wanted to vote against the bill, you voted yes. If you wanted the bill, you voted no. Just the reverse of how it should have read. Californians are either too busy or too lazy to read the entire bills or even the arguments for and against so they go by the wording in the ballot description. In this case, no one wanted the bill to pass, so they voted no, and the bill passed. Someone with a little power should look into this practice. — Larry Ellis, Monrovia Fix immigration laws Re “For California, census case is Supreme Court’s biggest” (Opinion, May 24): Having read Tom Elias’ column, I think he is among many in California that suffers from TDS: Trump Derangement Syndrome. Elias states that placing a question about citizenship on the ballot for the 2020 census might result in untold numbers of undocumented immigrants not getting counted. This, in turn, might mean California would lose billions of dollars in federal funds based on population count. Well, with the United States currently $22 trillion in debt and counting, one might ask how can we be doling out federal funds to cover millions of immigrants who have no right to be here in the first place. We can’t have it both ways — open borders and billions of dollars in benefits. Way past time to adjust our immigration laws to reflect the current situation on our borders. — Thomas Jebb, Camarillo Contact your legislators Re “With Senate Bill 50 on hold, here are some alternatives” (Opinion, June 7): Thomas Elias’ article is important to us all. The state Legislature is running roughshod over us all with Senate Bill 50, SB 330 and Assembly Bill 1763. These bills will take away from so much from so many people. They should not be passed. Please urge your readers to call, email or write their representatives and the governor, asking them to just say no. — Chris Dreike, Torrance
14 Jun 19
San Gabriel Valley Tribune
Re “Your tax dollars at work as cities shut traffic lanes” (Opinion, June 2): I really enjoyed reading Steven Greenhut’s article, but he needs to go a little farther. The reason that bill was passed was because of the description given in the voter’s ballot. We need someone who can read over the descriptions of ballots before they go to the press so they are not ambiguous. In the case of the gasoline and DMV bill, if you wanted to vote against the bill, you voted yes. If you wanted the bill, you voted no. Just the reverse of how it should have read. Californians are either too busy or too lazy to read the entire bills or even the arguments for and against so they go by the wording in the ballot description. In this case, no one wanted the bill to pass, so they voted no, and the bill passed. Someone with a little power should look into this practice. — Larry Ellis, Monrovia Fix immigration laws Re “For California, census case is Supreme Court’s biggest” (Opinion, May 24): Having read Tom Elias’ column, I think he is among many in California that suffers from TDS: Trump Derangement Syndrome. Elias states that placing a question about citizenship on the ballot for the 2020 census might result in untold numbers of undocumented immigrants not getting counted. This, in turn, might mean California would lose billions of dollars in federal funds based on population count. Well, with the United States currently $22 trillion in debt and counting, one might ask how can we be doling out federal funds to cover millions of immigrants who have no right to be here in the first place. We can’t have it both ways — open borders and billions of dollars in benefits. Way past time to adjust our immigration laws to reflect the current situation on our borders. — Thomas Jebb, Camarillo Contact your legislators Re “With Senate Bill 50 on hold, here are some alternatives” (Opinion, June 7): Thomas Elias’ article is important to us all. The state Legislature is running roughshod over us all with Senate Bill 50, SB 330 and Assembly Bill 1763. These bills will take away from so much from so many people. They should not be passed. Please urge your readers to call, email or write their representatives and the governor, asking them to just say no. — Chris Dreike, Torrance
14 Jun 19
Daily Breeze
Re “Your tax dollars at work as cities shut traffic lanes” (Opinion, June 2): I really enjoyed reading Steven Greenhut’s article, but he needs to go a little farther. The reason that bill was passed was because of the description given in the voter’s ballot. We need someone who can read over the descriptions of ballots before they go to the press so they are not ambiguous. In the case of the gasoline and DMV bill, if you wanted to vote against the bill, you voted yes. If you wanted the bill, you voted no. Just the reverse of how it should have read. Californians are either too busy or too lazy to read the entire bills or even the arguments for and against so they go by the wording in the ballot description. In this case, no one wanted the bill to pass, so they voted no, and the bill passed. Someone with a little power should look into this practice. — Larry Ellis, Monrovia Fix immigration laws Re “For California, census case is Supreme Court’s biggest” (Opinion, May 24): Having read Tom Elias’ column, I think he is among many in California that suffers from TDS: Trump Derangement Syndrome. Elias states that placing a question about citizenship on the ballot for the 2020 census might result in untold numbers of undocumented immigrants not getting counted. This, in turn, might mean California would lose billions of dollars in federal funds based on population count. Well, with the United States currently $22 trillion in debt and counting, one might ask how can we be doling out federal funds to cover millions of immigrants who have no right to be here in the first place. We can’t have it both ways — open borders and billions of dollars in benefits. Way past time to adjust our immigration laws to reflect the current situation on our borders. — Thomas Jebb, Camarillo Contact your legislators Re “With Senate Bill 50 on hold, here are some alternatives” (Opinion, June 7): Thomas Elias’ article is important to us all. The state Legislature is running roughshod over us all with Senate Bill 50, SB 330 and Assembly Bill 1763. These bills will take away from so much from so many people. They should not be passed. Please urge your readers to call, email or write their representatives and the governor, asking them to just say no. — Chris Dreike, Torrance
14 Jun 19
Greg's Webvault

Too Many People Want to Travel Massive crowds are causing environmental degradation, dangerous conditions, and the immiseration and pricing-out of locals. JUN 4, 2019 Annie Lowrey Staff writer at The Atlantic   Late in May, the Louvre closed. The museum’s workers walked out, arguing that overcrowding at the home of the Mona Lisa and the Venus de Milo had […]

14 Jun 19
opentest20's blogs

Aggressively Defending DUIs in Los Angeles, Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. My clients are not only facing jail time or lengthy prison sentences, but they are also usually an emotional wreck and that is why I pride myself on always being available to my client and that is why I have a dedicated phone line […]

14 Jun 19
wavemarket86's blogs

There is a broad range of behaviors which are acceptable as indicators of potential DWI to law enforcement officials. All DUI lawyers say they are the best, so make sure you do your homework…If you have been arrested or charged with a DUI in Los Angeles, Riverside, San Bernardino, Ventura or Orange Counties, our experienced […]

14 Jun 19
East Bay Times
Q: I’ve tried submitting this request directly to Caltrans but it seems to fall on deaf ears. Time to call in the Top Gun — you. How can we get some clean-up work done on every single ramp on Interstate 880 between Oakland and San Jose? The average weed height is 3 feet tall and some are in excess of 6 feet. Add in the trash and it looks like an apocalyptic wasteland. If Caltrans gets out there and cleans it up, it would also be much appreciated if they use a Weedwacker to go around posts, trees, etc. If my son ever mowed our yard like this, I’d send him back out with scissors at 11 p.m. and tell to not come back in the house until the job was done. Any hope? Tim Riener[cq comment=”//CQ//”], Fremont Like Mr. Roadshow’s Facebook page for more questions and answers about Bay Area roads, freeways and commuting. A: Tough Dad. I can’t guarantee every ramp will be spruced up, but many are on Top Gun’s must-do-list. This will take some time as it involves several agencies. But now that rain is in our rear-view mirror, you’ll see some weedwacking. Q: The other night, me and 25,000 of my closest friends journeyed to Shoreline Amphitheater to see the Grateful Dead. It took two hours to drive from Middlefield Road to my parking spot. One of the three lanes into the facility was blocked off apparently due to some minor median upgrades. Did Mountain View get an inordinate amount of snow this winter preventing the work from getting done before the concert season? Michael Quigley, Fremont A: Spending two hours trying to get parked gives you reason to be upset. Shoreline folks know about this. Q: I noticed a Mountain View police officer driving in traffic on Middlefield Road and Rengstorff. Can you guess what he was doing? Yes, texting on his cellphone. Holding the phone in one hand on the steering wheel and texting with the other hand. Unbelievable. Jim Y., Mountain View    A: Police are exempt from cellphone rules, though many departments advised its cops to avoid texting, etc. Sometimes they do so to stay off the airwaves when needing to make work calls. Q: So DMV requires an office visit for seniors over 62 to receive their ID without paying a fee. What happens to seniors living in nursing homes or assisted living facilities? They are unable to go to a DMV office to renew their ID, but they do need it for medical and legal purposes. How can the DMV help them without an office visit? Cynthia Wei A: If someone cannot visit a DMV office, contact the DMV’s Senior Ombudsman Program at http://www.dmv.ca.gov/portal/dmv/detail/about/senior/senior_ombudsman for details or call: [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] In the Bay Area 510-563-8998. Sacramento or Northern California 916-657-6464. Orange/San Bernardino/San Diego 714-705-1588. Los Angeles/Oxnard 310-615-3552. Look for Gary Richards at Facebook.com/mr.roadshow or contact him at mrroadshow@bayareanewsgroup.com.
14 Jun 19
The Mercury News
Q: I’ve tried submitting this request directly to Caltrans but it seems to fall on deaf ears. Time to call in the Top Gun — you. How can we get some clean-up work done on every single ramp on Interstate 880 between Oakland and San Jose? The average weed height is 3 feet tall and some are in excess of 6 feet. Add in the trash and it looks like an apocalyptic wasteland. If Caltrans gets out there and cleans it up, it would also be much appreciated if they use a Weedwacker to go around posts, trees, etc. If my son ever mowed our yard like this, I’d send him back out with scissors at 11 p.m. and tell to not come back in the house until the job was done. Any hope? Tim Riener[cq comment=”//CQ//”], Fremont Like Mr. Roadshow’s Facebook page for more questions and answers about Bay Area roads, freeways and commuting. A: Tough Dad. I can’t guarantee every ramp will be spruced up, but many are on Top Gun’s must-do-list. This will take some time as it involves several agencies. But now that rain is in our rear-view mirror, you’ll see some weedwacking. Q: The other night, me and 25,000 of my closest friends journeyed to Shoreline Amphitheater to see the Grateful Dead. It took two hours to drive from Middlefield Road to my parking spot. One of the three lanes into the facility was blocked off apparently due to some minor median upgrades. Did Mountain View get an inordinate amount of snow this winter preventing the work from getting done before the concert season? Michael Quigley, Fremont A: Spending two hours trying to get parked gives you reason to be upset. Shoreline folks know about this. Q: I noticed a Mountain View police officer driving in traffic on Middlefield Road and Rengstorff. Can you guess what he was doing? Yes, texting on his cellphone. Holding the phone in one hand on the steering wheel and texting with the other hand. Unbelievable. Jim Y., Mountain View    A: Police are exempt from cellphone rules, though many departments advised its cops to avoid texting, etc. Sometimes they do so to stay off the airwaves when needing to make work calls. Q: So DMV requires an office visit for seniors over 62 to receive their ID without paying a fee. What happens to seniors living in nursing homes or assisted living facilities? They are unable to go to a DMV office to renew their ID, but they do need it for medical and legal purposes. How can the DMV help them without an office visit? Cynthia Wei A: If someone cannot visit a DMV office, contact the DMV’s Senior Ombudsman Program at http://www.dmv.ca.gov/portal/dmv/detail/about/senior/senior_ombudsman for details or call: [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] In the Bay Area 510-563-8998. Sacramento or Northern California 916-657-6464. Orange/San Bernardino/San Diego 714-705-1588. Los Angeles/Oxnard 310-615-3552. Look for Gary Richards at Facebook.com/mr.roadshow or contact him at mrroadshow@bayareanewsgroup.com.
14 Jun 19
vestdanger26's blogs

Aggressively Defending DUIs in Los Angeles, Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. My clients are not only facing jail time or lengthy prison sentences, but they are also usually an emotional wreck and that is why I pride myself on always being available to my client and that is why I have a dedicated phone line […]