Cards Against Humanity

22 Jul 19
mark a forster

THERE’S something terribly wrong with our practice of democracy when self-serving, largely unpleasant people take office. Donald Trump has proven himself to be an awful human being, robbing the American presidency of class, decency, humanity and any clue what is going on in the country or elsewhere. In Britain, Boris Johnson is widely being tipped […]

22 Jul 19
Otaku, she wrote

When I watch an anime adaptation, if I compare it to the manga, I often do it because I’m either trying to figure out the thought process behind adaptational choices, or evaluating how different mediums (and creatives) approach the same story. Discussions that begin and end with a simple “this is different from the manga, […]

22 Jul 19
VentureBeat
Microsoft today announced that it would invest $1 billion in OpenAI, the San Francisco-based AI research firm cofounded by CTO Greg Brockman, chief scientist Ilya Sutskever, Elon Musk, and others, with backing from luminaries like LinkedIn cofounder Reid Hoffman and former Y Combinator president Sam Altman. In a blog post, Brockman said the investment will support the development of artificial general intelligence (AGI) — AI with the capacity to learn any intellectual task that a human can — with “widely distributed” economic benefits. To this end, OpenAI intends to partner with Microsoft to jointly develop new AI technologies for the Seattle company’s Azure cloud platform and will enter into an exclusivity agreement with Microsoft to “further extend” large-scale AI capabilities that “deliver on the promise of AGI.” Additionally, OpenAI will license some of its technologies to Microsoft, which will commercialize them and sell them to as-yet-unnamed partners, and OpenAI will train and run AI models on Azure as it works to develop new supercomputing hardware while “adhering to principles on ethics and trust.” “AI is one of the most transformative technologies of our time and has the potential to help solve many of our world’s most pressing challenges,” said Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella. “By bringing together OpenAI’s breakthrough technology with new Azure AI supercomputing technologies, our ambition is to democratize AI — while always keeping AI safety front and center — so everyone can benefit.” According to Brockman, the partnership was motivated in part by OpenAI’s continued pursuit of enormous computational power. Its researchers recently released analysis showing that from 2012 to 2018 the amount of compute used in the largest AI training runs grew by more than 300,000 times, with a 3.5-month doubling time, far exceeding the pace of Moore’s Law. Perhaps exemplifying the trend is OpenAI’s OpenAI Five, an AI system that squared off against professional players of the video game Dota 2 last summer. On Google’s Cloud Platform — in the course of training — it played 180 years’ worth of games every day on 256 Nvidia Tesla P100 graphics cards and 128,000 processor cores, up from 60,000 cores just a few years ago. “OpenAI is producing a sequence of increasingly powerful AI technologies, which requires a lot of capital,” Brockman said. “The most obvious way to cover costs is to build a product, but that would mean changing our focus.” OpenAI publishes studies in AI subfields from computer vision to natural language processing (NLP), with the stated mission of safely creating superintelligent software. The startup — which began in 2015 as a nonprofit but later restructured as a capped-profit company under OpenAI LP, an investment vehicle — last year detailed an AI robotics system with human-like dexterity. Its Dota 2 bot defeated 99.4% of players in public matches and a team of professional players twice, and its most sophisticated NLP model can generate convincingly humanlike short stories and Amazon reviews from whole cloth. Beyond its flashier projects, OpenAI has contributed to open source tools like Gym, a toolkit for testing and comparing reinforcement learning algorithms that learn to achieve goals from trial and error, and Neural MMO, a “massively multi-agent” virtual training ground that plops agents in the middle of an RPG-like world. Other recent public work includes CoinRun, which tests the adaptability of reinforcement learning agents; Spinning Up, a program designed to teach anyone deep learning; Sparse Transformers, which can predict what comes next in lengthy text, image, and audio sequences; and MuseNet, which generates novel four-minute songs with 10 different instruments across a range of genres and styles. OpenAI is in many ways the stateside counterpart of U.K.-based DeepMind, which Google parent company Alphabet acquired in 2014 for £400 million ($500 million). Since its founding in 2010, DeepMind has — like OpenAI — leaned heavily on computation-heavy techniques to achieve remarkable AI gains in gaming, media synthesis, and medicine. The advancements haven’t come cheap — Wired reports that in 2017 DeepMind burned through £334 million ($442 million). For its part, OpenAI previously secured a $1 billion endowment from its founding members and investors, and OpenAI LP has so far attracted funds from Hoffman’s charitable foundation and Khosla Ventures. The company spent $11.2 million in 2016, according to its most recently available IRS filing. Brockman and CEO Altman believe that true AGI will be able to master more fields than any one person, chiefly by identifying complex cross-disciplinary connections that elude human experts. Furthermore, they predict that responsibly deployed AGI — in other words, AGI deployed in “close collaboration” with researchers in relevant fields, like social science — might help solve longstanding challenges in climate change, health care, and education. “The creation of [AGI] will be the most important technological development in human history, with the potential to shape the trajectory of humanity,” said Altman. “Our mission is to ensure that AGI technology benefits all of humanity, and we’re working with Microsoft to build the supercomputing foundation on which we’ll build AGI. We believe it’s crucial that AGI is deployed safely and securely and that its economic benefits are widely distributed.” As for Microsoft, it’s yet another notch in an AI toolbelt comprising everything from research grants and solutions suites like Windows Vision Skills to machine learning-powered productivity features in Office 365. On the product side, the company recently rolled out enhancements to Azure Cognitive Services, a prebuilt service designed to expedite no-code AI model creation, and Azure Machine Learning, a cloud-hosted toolset that facilitates the development of predictive models, classifiers, and recommender systems. Additionally, it launched in preview a software kit for robotics and autonomous physical systems development, and it open-sourced a tool that enables developers to imbue AI systems with explainable components. These updates followed on the heels of high-profile AI collaborations with AT&T, Adobe, and others. Last July, Microsoft said it would team up with Walmart to expedite the retailer’s digital transformation via a combination of AI, cloud, and internet of things (IoT) services, principally by supplying the necessary infrastructure via Azure and applying machine learning services to tasks like routing delivery trucks. Concurrently, the company accelerated its investments in both late-stage and relatively nascent AI startups, contributing to an estimated 72% industry-wide year-over-year uptick in AI and machine learning funding. In June, Microsoft acquired Berkeley, California-based startup Bonsai, which designs deep learning tools aimed at the enterprise. And in November it purchased XOXCO, maker of the Botkit framework that creates conversational bots for team communications chat apps like Slack and Microsoft Teams, months after snatching up Lobe, creator of a platform for building custom deep learning models using a visual interface.
22 Jul 19
NERDS LIKE ME

Author: Ed McDonald (website  / twitter) UK Publisher: Gollancz Genre: Fantasy, dark fantasy The republic faces annihilation, despite the vigilance of Galharrow’s Blackwings. When a raven tattoo rips itself from his arm to deliver a desperate message, Galharrow and a mysterious noblewoman must investigate a long dead sorcerer’s legacy. But there is a conspiracy within the […]

22 Jul 19
ThatLittleLola

Hey guys! Last month I wrote a post about the things that I begrudge buying or no longer buy. This time, I’m doing the opposite, and listing the things that I do buy. Some of these, I may not need. Others, it’s impulsive. Candles I am a complete sucker for Yankee Candles, so I am […]

22 Jul 19
Travel Bugg

This story was originally printed in the fall 2018 version of Fellowship! Magazine. By Ashleigh Bugg The children’s detention center is housed in an old Walmart building in Brownsville, Texas. The former big box retailer can hold roughly 1,500 children who have been separated from their parents, many against their will. “The detention centers have […]

22 Jul 19
The Hopefulist

Surround yourself with people who will always support you and be there for you. It’s easy to say and you think it should be easy to make happen but that’s not always the case. We all have that one (or a couple) person in our lives that seems to challenge every decision we make. That […]

22 Jul 19
The Butcher Shop

Joseph did you know we’s all gonna ride the train? Sometimes when an idea pops up it takes on a life of its own. So it was with the founder of the Mormon faith on that hill long ago. Joseph Smith could not possibly have known how far his ideas would go when he concocted […]

22 Jul 19
Just Bear With Me...

A few weeks ago, I finally watched Reservoir Dogs. I am very squeamish about blood (seeing it can literally cause me physical pain[1]), and I knew there was a great deal of bloodletting in Quentin Tarantino’s 1992 heist-gone-wrong neo-noir masterpiece. Plus, a friend had once informed me she could never hear the Stealers Wheel song […]

22 Jul 19
Boston Herald
Trump fights back The young progressive, liberal House members thought the usual tactic of reverse discrimination would force President Trump to capitulate to their one-way agenda. If you listen to their manipulative rhetoric you can hear them tell voters that color, not facts, makes your argument reasonable. As long as ideas are aligned with their divisive undermining of capitalism your philosophy is accepted. Otherwise personal opinion is irreverent. I guess that is the correct position if you live in a socialist society which these outspoken congresswomen are seeking. However in a free republic that is not the case. So if “the squad” wanted to go bully a president into submission, they picked the wrong guy. President Trump’s resistance to such tactics is the reason he will succeed into a second term. Maybe his style is not as gracious as many would like, but when such aggressive forces have slipped into our system of government with their goal to destroy the most effective democracy the world has ever seen, the country needs a president who can fight back just as hard. — Al DePaoli Woburn Citing race To the surprise of no one, those on the left and in the liberal media are up in arms over Donald Trump’s call for members of “the squad” to “go back” to the ancestral countries from which they came. Immediately, Mr. Trump’s foes pounced, labeling his comments as racist. Since then, Trump has been relentlessly pilloried for ostensibly singling out women of color. On Tuesday, in the latest Beltway spectacle, the Democrat-controlled House even voted to condemn Mr. Trump’s comments. Ironically, it was just a few days ago that these same members of “the squad” were condemning Nancy Pelosi for her own racist singling out of “women of color.” Of course, ascribing the charge of racism to those who disagree with them has been a tried and true tactic of the left and liberal media for decades now. Regrettably, it’s become increasingly clear that as we head towards 2020, Democrats will aggressively use race as a cudgel to bludgeon Donald Trump. But to grotesquely and blithely inject race for partisan purposes is not only politics at its very worst, its humanity at its very worst. In the future, we would all do well to remember that when people play the race card, everyone gets dealt a losing hand. — Michael J. DiStefano Jamestown, R.I. Left’s labels Boy am I sick and tired of hearing the left go on about “hate.” They want to call Trump racist and hateful. He is calling them out on being anti-American. It has nothing to do with race. He is trying to improve the country. They are trying to tear it down. The left complains about it whenever they are taken to task or called out on outrageous comments or views. Who is spewing the most hate? The left! Look at Antifa getting violent. Look at CNN defending them. Look at the leftist trying to firebomb an ICE facility. ICE protects Americans! (Rep. Ilhan) Omar said terrible things about 9/11. Many Americans died. The left “squad” seems to think they should be able to trash anyone who disagrees with them; label them as racists and bigots and advocate violence against them and then they say the people on the right are the haters. Good for Trump for calling them out. They can’t defend their positions so they try to act like any criticism of them or their views is because they are female or “women of color.”  They are playing the same name-calling game Hillary (Clinton) played. The outcome will be the same too. — Roger Keller Weymouth  
22 Jul 19
cul de sac ville 쿨데삭 빌

Cul de Sac Ville Project (2017-2019 on going) I. In his book “What is a Thing” Martin Heidegger differentiates things and objects. Things are those which determine and enable our everyday life, like a hut, a bridge, or our shoes and oddly he also mentions the motorway snaking through the landscape. These are things, not […]

22 Jul 19
Save the World

NEURALINK: THE WAR AGAINST HUMANITY GOES MAINSTREAM https://www.bitchute.com/video/VnjhABYIsjVo/ I’ll say this much, Neuralink is bad enough. If you add satellites in the mix ( see previous post), that is Starlink, then…. You would get the perfect control grid and slavery grid. Essentially the matrix would be built. Fiber optic cables could be cut off. Towers […]

22 Jul 19
Splendid Phoenix

  Over the years, I have failed in my attempts at inventing a path to success both professionally and personally. Although many reasons could be listed for this, I sincerely believe it is due in large part to my initial failure of not scripting a goal. Where do I see myself in 5 years? Information […]

21 Jul 19
Bruce's Blog

How artificial intelligence will do our dirty work, take our jobs and change our lives Shane Hegarty   Jul 20, 2019 FIFTY YEARS AFTER THE MOON LANDING, A NEW IRISH TIMES SERIES LOOKS ON WHAT THE FUTURE HOLDS FOR US AND THE NEXT GENERATIONS. HERE, PART 1 EXPLORES HOW ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE WILL CHANGE OUR LIVES […]