Celeste Headlee

14 May 19
The Book Publicist

Learn about how a TEDx Talk can help you make it big as an author. A TEDx talk can be a great opportunity to get yourself noticed as an author. It may be just what you need to land the book deal you’ve always wanted.

13 May 19
Wireless Alarm Installation

We could all get better at conversing with our fellow humans. It’s just so easy these days to hide behind our screens, and when we’re finally face to face with actual people, we’re often talking too much and not listening enough. from Pocket https://lifehacker.com/how-to-be-a-better-conversationalist-with-journalist-c-1834720593 via Best Home Alarms

01 May 19
ZETETIKOS

“The most fundamental concept of all good conversations (and life in general) is the ability to listen. It’s the hardest thing to do but it’s the most important. When I’m talking, I’m in control. I don’t have to hear anything I’m not interested in. I’m the center of attention. I can bolster my own identity. […]

28 Apr 19
Kayla's Blog

How do you interact with people most? The average teenager would reply that they interact the most by snap chatting or texting. Most of us tend to not avoid deep conversations as much as possible. Many of us do not even know how to carry a conversation. In a ted talk by Celeste Headlee, she […]

19 Apr 19
Thrive Global
By Shana Lebowitz Small talk can be awkward and excruciating if it goes on too long.We listed the best strategies to take your conversations to the next level.Those strategies include revealing something slightlypersonal and asking for stories, not answers.Visit BusinessInsider.com for more stories. Heading to a networking event or a happy hour with colleagues? It helps to have a few tricks up your sleeve to use as soon as — or even before — a conversation hits a wall. We checked out some relevant Quora threads as well as other resources to find strategies for having meaningful conversations with anyone you meet. Read on to see the best of what we uncovered. Have some ‘deep’ conversation starters on hand Don’t expect substantive topics to instantly spring to mind. Instead, says Tracy Chou, a former software engineer at Pinterest, you should approach any interaction with a few deep conversation starters ready to go. Chou suggests reading books on behavioral economics or pop psychology and talking about them, “since those subjects are fundamentally about people — and everyone is a person, has to interact with other people, and has opinions about their own behavior and other people’s behavior.” She also recommends watching a few TED Talks — “another great source of cool ideas about the world.” We suggest starting with some TED Talks that will make you smarter about business. Ask questions about topics the other person is interested in Don’t expect substantive topics to instantly spring to mind. Instead, says Tracy Chou, a former software engineer at Pinterest, you should approach any interaction with a few deep conversation starters ready to go. Chou suggests reading books on behavioral economics or pop psychology and talking about them, “since those subjects are fundamentally about people — and everyone is a person, has to interact with other people, and has opinions about their own behavior and other people’s behavior.” She also recommends watching a few TED Talks — “another great source of cool ideas about the world.” We suggest starting with some TED Talks that will make you smarter about business. Ask questions about topics the other person is interested in Multiple Quora users indicated that one of the best ways to start an interesting conversation is to find something the other person is excited about. Show that you want to learn more about the topic by asking a series of questions related to it. Says Tatiana Esteves: “Try picking a topic that they are really interested in and start with a normal ‘shallow conversation.’ Then ask quite probing question[s] even if the subject isn’t that serious.” For example, Esteves says, “if they like celebrity news, ask them if they think that the ‘celebrity culture’ is making people less happy with their lives.” Find out what makes the other person special Whatever you say, writes Joshua Evans, “avoid the awful opening phrase, ‘What do you do?'” You’ll put your conversation partner in a box where all he can talk about is his job. Instead, Evans says you should ask, “What makes you a badass? That will induce a chuckle over drinks.” You might even find out something crazy; perhaps they’re a lawyer by day and a rock musician by night. In fact, in France, asking someone what they do for a living is considered a faux pas. The French often ask each other about where they like to vacation. Avoid discussing the weather So it’s three degrees colder than average for March. Big deal. “Avoid [talking about the weather] like the plague. It’s like the black hole of shallow conversation,” says Ambra Benjamin, a recruiting leader at Facebook. Assume the other person has deep thoughts “If you assume that there is any possibility that the other person might be dull or will talk stupid, maybe you won’t ask things that draw them out in the right way and YOU will ruin the discussion by making it dull,” writes Tobias C. Brown. In other words, assume the other person is just as eager to have meaningful conversations as you are. Don’t push people to see your perspective If you approach every conversation as an opportunity to convert people to your values and beliefs, you’ll probably have a hard time getting anyone to stick around. After all, no one likes to feel like they’re being proselytized. “Don’t have too much of an investment in being right or persuading people to adopt your point of view,” says Joel Postman. Instead, be open to hearing about your partner’s ideas and at least trying to understand her perspective. Reveal something slightly personal “Reveal something about yourself, and discuss how it felt and what you learned from it,” writes Jan Leadbetter. “This invariably leads to disclosures from other people. They don’t have to be massive secrets or anything like that, just something personal.” Leadbetter’s theory is supported by science: Psychologists say that when you disclose something about yourself, other people feel inclined to do the same. Just be careful not to get too personal. For example, you can mention how you discovered a new favorite musical artist this week — not that you’re having a clandestine affair. Talk about something specific you’re working on When someone asks you what you do for a living, don’t simply say you’re a writer or a doctor. According to Lifehacker, you can liven up the conversation by adding a few details about something you accomplished that week. Similarly, when you’re asked what you do for fun, talk about a recent experience you had doing your hobby, whether that’s knitting wool scarves or jogging in the park. Ask for stories, not answers It can be tempting to try breaking the ice with an innocuous question like, “How was your weekend?” or “What’s up?” But as Chris Colin and Rob Baedeker write on TED.com, you can elicit some more detail by asking, “What was the best part of your weekend?” or “What are you looking forward to this week?” That way, your conversation partner can tell a story that allows you to learn more about him and what makes him tick. Be less selfish If you’re consumed with panic about how you’re coming off, consider changing your mindset and thinking about how your conversation partner is feeling instead. Writes Pham Tien Hiep: “We view people through a selfish lens, thinking ‘What can they do for me?’ while really we should think of how we can be of service to other people. “When we get out of our own heads and think of others, all of a sudden the right things to say come easy to us. Once we’re available for other people, we’re more available for ourselves and don’t have to think of what to say.” Come up with ‘conversational sparks’ It’s fine to browse the news for potential conversation topics — as long as you take it one step further. Jeff Callahan suggests: “For each current topic, create one ‘Conversational Spark’ to add at the end of your blurb.” His examples include: “… what do you guys think? Would you rather A or B?” and “… If you got paid $1,000 would you do XYZ?” Don’t stick to a script Public radio correspondent Celeste Headlee gave a TEDx Talk in which she distilled everything she’s learned from interviewing sources into tips for having more productive conversations. One of those tips — applicable to journalists and everyone else — is “go with the flow.” In other words, it’s OK if your conversation doesn’t go exactly according to plan, as long as it’s interesting. Headlee said: “We’ve heard interviews often in which a guest is talking for several minutes and then the host comes back in and asks a question which seems like it comes out of nowhere, or it’s already been answered. That means the host probably stopped listening two minutes ago because he thought of this really clever question, and he was just bound and determined to say that. “And we do the exact same thing. … Stories and ideas are going to come to you. You need to let them come and let them go.” Add a serious twist to a light topic Diana Booher, author of “Communicate Like a Leader,” writes on HuffPost about using an otherwise dull comment as a launching point for an interesting conversation. For example, if the other person says, “I just got back from vacation. I dread looking at my inbox tomorrow,” you might respond with, “For someone like you who travels so much with your job, what do you want in a vacation? What’s new, different, relaxing to you?” Ask for advice We’ll admit it: This technique takes guts. But it’ll definitely get you out of a conversational rut. Research suggests asking for advice can also help you seem more competent and can make the other person feel like your ally. Plus, you may just get a great tip on what to bring as a housewarming gift or where to find some fashionable new work clothes. Originally published on Business Insider. More from Business Insider: 6 science-backed reasons you keep procrastinating — and what you can do to beat it once and for all 10 expert tips for wowing a hiring manager to land the job of your dreams I asked experts how to be healthier — here are the 8 best tips they gave me Follow us here and subscribe here for all the latest news on how you can keep Thriving. Stay up to date or catch-up on all our podcasts with Arianna Huffington here.
15 Apr 19

On April 2, radio journalist, speaker and author Celeste Headlee presented “Ten Ways to Have Better Conversations” at the annual Dean Stone Lecture hosted by the University of Montana School of Journalism. In a time when conversations are often minimized to a few words in a text message and lack of meaningful communication and dialogue […]

13 Apr 19
Society19 UK

Unemployment is plaguing society, it is a growing problem for university students graduating their degrees without a job offer. It is much more common than we think and we can learn more from these moments than we often realise. Despite the hardship of searching for a job, here are the best Ted Talks to encourage […]

12 Apr 19
Posts By Poster

Recently, I have become a TED Talk junkie. I watched one and suddenly I can’t stop. I recently came across one that I absolutely loved. The talk’s speaker is Celeste Headlee and it is about how to have a good conversation. Now, you may be thinking I already know how to talk to someone. But […]

06 Apr 19
Generation PR

Who doesn’t love TED Talks? I learn something new every time I watch one and I can easily fall down the binge-watch rabbit hole once I find a playlist on an especially interesting topic. In case you don’t know what TED Talks are, just think of them as bite-sized speeches on a specialized subject given […]

01 Apr 19
Sometimes zen

What I am reading A whole lot of stuff on technology and data leaks in today’s world  1. This Spyware Data Leak Is So Bad We Can’t Even Tell You About It This was on a spyware app that allows its customers to monitor content on the cellphone where it is installed. The company’s database […]

31 Mar 19
Media Communication in the Digital Age

Academic professors often ask the question, “What is the most vital component of communication?” “Listening”, profess the students in unison. Then commences the active listening lecture. This proverb of communication pedagogy has been updated as of recent due to research showing that the current model of active listening can be detrimental to building a depth […]

27 Mar 19
Ellen G. White Books

How grateful are you for your life? When you learn the benefits of gratitude, you’d understand the power of your mindset. Life experiences come in all shapes, colors, and sizes. Today, the sun is shining and the weather is awesome. Tomorrow, the clouds are heavy, and you don’t feel like getting out of bed. I […]

27 Mar 19
Beef Runner

As I was going through some notes this week, I found one of my favorite TED Talk videos. Conversation skills are so important, yet so many people lack at least some of these today. Granted, I’ll count myself in that crowd. Learning is a life-long process and new knowledge is something we should always pursue. […]

25 Mar 19
Ruang 1207

10 Basic Rules to Have a Good Conversation Author ingin bertanya nih kepada pengunjung Ruang 1207, Apakah kamu termasuk orang yang meng-unfollow teman di media social hanya karena dia membahas hal yang berlebihan terkait politik, kultur, makanan atau topik yang tidak kamu sukai? Apakah kamu pernah menghindari seseorang  hanya karena tidak ingin berbicara dengannya? Nah. […]

19 Mar 19
Go-to-Market Ally

We all know it to be true: “Change is the only constant in life” (Heraclitus of Ephesus c. 535 BC – 475 BC). The same applies to business, of course. Not only is it a critical competitive advantage to be adept at change, companies know they must evolve to survive. It’s one of the things that […]