Champion

19 Jul 19
The Denver Post
The 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing has aerospace veterans Maureen O’Brien [cq comment=”(cq)”]and Stanley Kennedy Jr.[cq comment=” (cq)”] celebrating what the industry has achieved and looking forward to the kinds of projects that will drive space exploration in the decades ahead. The founders of Oakman Aerospace, each with years of experience with such industry powerhouses as Martin Lockheed and General Dynamics, see opportunities for smaller companies and the potential for partnerships with businesses spanning the globe. The company, based in Highlands Ranch, has developed a platform that can be customized to enable small- and medium-size companies to plan missions, launch small satellites or determine how their instruments will mesh with another company’s spacecraft. The platform, called ACORN — Advanced Configurable Open-System Research Network — is designed so smaller companies don’t need what O’Brien calls a standing army of experts to handle different aspects of planning, designing, building, testing and launching space projects. “There’s lots of people who have really cool ideas to do in space, but they need to understand ‘How do I get that into space and make sure it works.’ Even though space is getting less expensive, it’s still really expensive,” said Kennedy, who participated in panels at the Wings over the Rockies Air and Space Museum’s weeklong celebration of Apollo 11. And Oakman has marked a major milestone in its other objective: working with companies and agencies in other countries to achieve shared goals and expand its business. The first of July, it sent its first shipment to a foreign company under an export license through the U.S. Department of Commerce. The 2013 defense bill opened the door to transferring less sensitive spacecraft and components from the United States Munitions List to the less restrictive Commerce Control List. O’Brien, the CEO, and Kennedy, the company’s president and chief systems engineer, said it wasn’t a snap, but Oakman got its first commercial export license in March and made its first international commercial shipment July 1. The recipient was NewSpace Systems in Cape Town, South Africa. RELATED: California has Silicon Valley. Could Colorado become home to “Aerospace Alley?” “It’s still controlled. We still have regulations on who we can and can’t sell to. All those things still apply, but it also allows for slightly less paperwork,” said O’Brien, who stressed “slightly” and then laughed. There are still plenty of hoops to jump through, but also wider opportunity, O’Brien and Kennedy said. For years, they joined other members of the Colorado Space Coalition, state officials and members of the state’s congressional delegation, including Sen. Michael Bennet and former Rep. Mike Coffman, to make it easier for U.S. aerospace companies to export technology that’s already available and doesn’t pose national security risks. At one point, anything that said “space” was controlled through International Traffic in Arms Regulations, O’Brien said. The regulations are intended to keep defense-related technology out of the wrong hands. Oakman will have to apply for an export license for each international business it sells to. The Space Foundation, an advocacy organization based in Colorado Springs, has said it supports the change in regulation to make U.S. aerospace companies more competitive globally. Oakman has set an example for other Colorado aerospace companies by pursuing and obtaining a commercial export license, said Jay Lindell, who serves as the aerospace and defense industry champion with the Colorado Office of Economic Development and International Trade. “This is a great example of persistence, having the patience to go through the regulatory process. It can be a lengthy process to get the certificates,” Lindell said. Some of the larger aerospace companies have navigated the regulatory twists and turns, but many smaller ones have not taken them on, Lindell added. That’s something Kennedy and O’Brien hope changes. They are big boosters of Colorado’s aerospace industry, which state and Denver-metro economic development officials say is second only to California’s. Colorado has 180 aerospace companies and more than 500 businesses that provide space-related products and services, according to a 2018 report by the Metro Denver Economic Development Corp. The report said the state has the highest concentration of direct private aerospace employment in the country: 26,620. And 60 percent or more of the companies have 10 or fewer employees, Kennedy said. “A lot of small companies just immediately see ‘State Department’ and ‘Commerce Department’ and say ‘No, we’re not big enough. We’re not going to do it,’ ” Kennedy said. “But I think there are a lot of opportunities for small businesses. It’s an added cost, but it isn’t prohibitive if you know what you’re doing.” Oakman Aerospace is a small, but growing company. O’Brien, Kennedy and Stanley Kennedy Sr. started Oakman after the company where they previously worked, small-satellite producer Comtech AeroAstro, was shut down in 2012. O’Brien and the younger Kennedy were in London for an air show when they got the news of the impending closure. After some discussion, they decided to carry on with their own business. “We started with six (employees) in that first year, and now we’re at 26,” said O’Brien said. Oakman has two buildings: one in Littleton acquired through a lease-purchase agreement with Comtech AeroAstro and a larger, main facility in Highlands Ranch where the company is adding lab space. Oakman was chosen as one of the “Colorado Companies to Watch” in 2015 and Kennedy is now chairman of the business group’s alumni committee. ColoradoBIZ magazine recently named Oakman, with O’Brien as a co-founder, to its list of top woman-owned companies for the third consecutive year. O’Brien is also a veteran, having started her career in the U.S. Navy as an aviation structural mechanic. She went on to work for Lockheed Martin and General Dynamics. Kennedy worked for years on launch vehicles, multiple spacecraft programs and ground systems while at Lockheed Martin, General Dynamics and Advanced Information Systems. Engineers for Oakman Aerospace, Inc., Drew Johnson, left, Warren Langley, right, and Joe Miceli, work together on the ACORN inside the clean lab at their headquarters in Littleton on April 17, 2019. Stanley Kennedy Sr., Oakman executive vice president, worked for a number of years at Boeing and the Department of Defense. At large aerospace companies, there was a group of 35 or 50 people whose whole job was to design missions, Kennedy said. “When we got here, we didn’t have those 40 people to design those missions.” Oakman’s technology is designed for companies that don’t have big staffs and experts in every subject area. It provides open, standardized interfaces that allow communications and tests between different systems, Kennedy said. Companies can use the software and components in the ACORN module, plug in their own components or products from other companies, depending on their need or project. “This is where space is going, open-system architecture and open source,” Kennedy said. “Think about Google and how they do application programming interfaces. That’s what we’re developing for space systems.” In other words, small companies and startups, which make up a big part of Colorado’s aerospace industry and are helping drive innovation, can tap into already available systems, technology, modeling and simulations as they build their projects or design missions. Oakman sees itself as disrupting the system by making technology and expertise more accessible. Oakman has also teamed up with a European company that works with the European Space Agency to standardize the data sheets of thousands of spacecraft components available across the world. Kennedy said the standardized data of catalogued components have been incorporated into ACORN so people can rapidly pick and compare satellite components. “We really are an enabler. We know how to build spacecraft. We used to build spacecraft, but what we’re trying to do now is enable the next generation of space enthusiasts to design, develop and fly their missions,” Kennedy said.
19 Jul 19
Patriotify

Via Fox News The Masters champion, a three-time winner on the links courses of the only major in Europe, shot a 7-over 78 on Thursday, his highest first-round score at the tournament and third-highest opening at any of the four biggest events in golf. Keep reading at source… Patriotify: The social network built by America. […]

19 Jul 19
BOLO BOOKS

From the Booking Desk: David Nemeth is one crime writings most fervent supporters of small press and indie publication. He is always willing to lend his voice (and tweet-power) to champion those causes and spread the word on books and authors that too often get less of the media spotlight. It is for that reason […]

19 Jul 19
Metro
[metro-video id=”1968928″ video=”https://videos.metro.co.uk/video/met/2019/07/19/1455606686283287028/640x360_MP4_1455606686283287028.mp4” image=”https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2019/07/19/11/16246616-0-image-a-148_1563531629870.jpg“] This is the heartwarming moment a boy with Down’s syndrome adopted his inner celebrity as he headed towards the finish line in a race. Lincoln Fay, four, high-fived cheering spectators as he entered the final straight in Bolton, Greater Manchester. He entered the IronKids 500 metre race with twin sister Lulu and older siblings Leo, 12, and Lacey, 10. Lulu graciously allows her brother to cross the finish line first as their mum Leanne Parsisson, 32, watches on. Healthcare assistant Leanne, from Bolton, said: ‘Lincoln lights our day up every day. He’s a little character – a handful who keeps us on our toes. ‘I felt so proud watching him run across that finish line, he was loving it. ‘I ran with him and he kept sitting down loads, but when he got to the crowd he milked it and kept high fiving everyone.’ Lincoln ‘lights our day up every day’, his mum says (Picture: Kennedy news) Lincoln high fives spectators (Picture: Kennedy news) The clip shows little Lincoln being cheered on by a commentator, who crouches down to encourage him before announcing: ‘here he is, he’s back. Rock and roll champion.’ Healthcare assistant Leanne added: ‘This is his third year, he loves it. ‘He always does it with his twin sister who doesn’t have Down’s syndrome. You can see her in the video and she stops for him.’ Leanne said the twins are very close and rarely apart – except at school where Lulu has been put in a different class because she ‘mothers’ Lincoln too much. She added: ‘They’re brilliant together and Lulu really looks after him.’ Twin sister Lulu graciously let her brother finish ahead of her (Picture: Kennedy news) Despite being in the race’s last wave, the youngster was spurred on in the final stretch to the delight of spectators. But he has had to overcome health issues since he was a baby to get to this stage. Aged two, Lincoln underwent major heart surgery and now has difficulty with swallowing and speaking. The family have started signing together to stop him missing out. Leanne said: ‘He does struggle, but not like we thought he would. Lincoln has faced a series of health issues (Picture: Kennedy news) ‘He’s a bit slower at developing, but the mainstream school really help him with one-to-one support. ‘It was really special to see him finish. A lot of health professionals told us he wouldn’t walk until a late age but he does really well, I’m so proud of him.’
19 Jul 19
talkSPORT
Fernando Llorente could re-sign for Tottenham as the club have reportedly made him a contract offer. The striker is currently a free agent following the expiration of his Spurs deal at the end of last month. Mauricio Pochettino needs extra cover for Harry Kane, particularly because of his injury problems over the last 18 months. Fernando Llorente scored important goals in Tottenham’s Champions League run last season The Daily Mail claim Spurs have offered Llorente a new one-year deal, but on reduced terms compared to his previous contract. The Spaniard was reportedly paid £100,000-a-week, but it is not known how much of a pay cut the north Londoners would want him to take. The 34-year-old is said to be considering his options with Tottenham currently on their pre-season tour of Asia. [article-rail-section title=”LATEST FOOTBALL NEWS” posts_category=”221″ posts_number=”8″ query_type=”recent” /] A number of clubs are thought to be monitoring his situation with Fiorentina believed to be one of those interested. Llorente scored just 13 goals in 66 appearances for the Tottenham in the two seasons he was there. [bc_video video_id=”6052586373001″ account_id=”6023583704001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Darren Gough discusses if Tanguy Ndombele will be a game changer for Tottenham “] He did, however, score crucial goals against Borussia Dortmund and Manchester City in the Champions League last season. The striker was the man Pochettino was forced to turn to when Kane was out injured and Heung-min Son was unavailable.
19 Jul 19
Sport Archives

More trouble for Tiger Woods. (Peter Morrison) Tiger Woods could not get anything at the first round on Thursday in Royal Portrush and he seemed to resign, saying “I must fight through” and that “the way he is and just as It's not the chance that he'll come back from his first promising 78th round, […]

19 Jul 19
The Undefeated
In the lead-up to his 1938 fight with German boxer Max Schmeling, black American fighter Joe Louis had the weight of the entire United States on his shoulders. Just two years beforehand, German leader Adolf Hitler violated the Treaty of Versailles through multiple acts of aggression and rearmament, which would eventually push America into a global conflict over ethnonationalism, fascism and world domination. Baked in the conflict was Hitler’s belief in a master race of tall, blond and blue-eyed white people. So, naturally, a heavyweight bout between a descendant of black slaves and the Nazis’ example of the ideal, superior human became a proxy for what would soon be World War II. Under normal circumstances, those in attendance for the fight at Yankee Stadium or the millions of Americans listening over the radio would have sided with the white man over the black brute in a test of strength, power and masculinity. But because this fight represented the future of democracy and freedom, Louis’ blackness took a back seat to his American citizenship; he was more of the “American” than “African” in “African American.” Author and boxing historian Thomas Hauser, writing in 2007, said that during the Louis-Schmeling buildup, it was “the first time that many people heard a black man referred to simply as ‘the American.’ ” Related Story When Joe Louis fought Schmeling, white America enthusiastically rooted for a black man Read now Nearly a century after Louis knocked out Schmeling just over two minutes into the first round, the question of who does and doesn’t represent the United States is still a vexing question when it comes to black athletes participating in international competitions. On July 20, World Boxing Association (WBA) world welterweight champion Keith “One Time” Thurman, 30, will defend his title against boxing legend Manny Pacquiao. While the lead-up to the fight has centered on how much the 40-year-old Pacquiao has left in the tank and the effect multiple injuries and absences from the ring will have on the younger and undefeated Thurman (29-0 with 1 no contest), there’s still that elephant that’s always been in the middle of any boxing ring: race. Pacquiao, the only boxer to ever hold world titles in eight different weight divisions, is quite possibly boxing’s most famous fighter, which is in no small part due to his being a native of the Philippines. To a country of more than 105 million people, the “Pac Man” is a superstar, icon and hero all wrapped up in one. He’s both a lieutenant colonel in the country’s army and a Philippine senator. He’s acted in multiple Filipino films and was the inspiration for two movies, 2006’s Pacquiao: The Movie and 2015’s Kid Kulafu. Pacquiao is the Philippines and the Philippines is Pacquiao. On the other hand, Thurman is from Clearwater, Florida, a city with as many black people (approximately 12,000) as Florida has complaints about alligator sightings (it’s true). Thurman is the son of a black father and white mother, although his olive skin and wavy hair have led people to confuse him for Hispanic or any other number of ethnicities. He’s also the quintessential pull-yourself-up-by-your-bootstraps, American story: going from a poor upbringing to a possible eight-figure payday for one fight. Thurman views himself as an American, plain and simple. Manny Pacquiao (left) and Keith Thurman (right) face off during a news conference at Gotham Hall in New York City on May 21 in preparation for their upcoming fight. Pacquiao and Thurman will meet for the world welterweight championship Saturday in Las Vegas. But in a fight with world title implications and an opponent who represents an entire country and millions of people, it begs the question: Is Thurman, a black man, the “American” in this fight? Racial conflict has always been a marketing ploy to drum up interest in prizefights, normally playing up differences in skin color and ethnicity to make it easier for audiences to choose sides: English fighter Daniel Mendoza was marketed as “the Jew” during fights in the late 1700s. “It’s always the African versus the Puerto Rican, the white versus the black, the Russian versus the American, the Cuban versus the Puerto Rican, the Mexican versus the black, or the Mexican versus the white,” Thurman said over the phone recently. Black fighters, from Jack Johnson to Louis to Muhammad Ali to Mike Tyson to Floyd Mayweather, have evoked an irrational fear and hatred from white audiences based almost entirely on the fighters’ blackness and white people’s fear of it. (Domestic violence incidents further tainted Tyson and Mayweather.) Johnson’s 1910 knockout of Jim Jeffries, who agreed to the fight only to “make an effort to reclaim the heavyweight championship for the white race,” led to riots and multiple deaths. Americans came around to supporting Louis during his two fights against Schmeling (Louis lost the first fight in 1936) for two reasons: 1) Louis wasn’t as controversial a black figure as Johnson, and 2) World War II was just around the corner. Ali’s refusal to be inducted into the U.S. Army and his association with the Nation of Islam made him one of the most hated men in America. As researcher Neil A. Wynn noted in his article “Deconstructing Tyson: The black boxer as American icon” published in The International Journal of the History of Sport, Tyson was called “an animal,” “a monster,” “a savage” and “evil incarnate” during his heyday throughout the 1990s. Mayweather’s 2017 fight against Irish UFC fighter Conor McGregor continued the tradition of racialized fight promotion. “If you really understand the history of boxing, then you do understand that boxing has always been a racist sport,” Thurman said, portraying zero malice or hyperbole in his voice, as if it’s accepted fact. As has been seen with the U.S. women’s national soccer team this summer and Serena Williams during any of the major tennis championships and Tommie Smith and John Carlos at the 1968 Olympics, skin color, gender and politics can decide who truly represents the country. Aside from the 1992 Dream Team, you’d be hard-pressed to identify a black athlete who could be considered the American hero in international sports competition. Canelo Álvarez and Andy Ruiz Jr. both represent Mexico. Gennady Golovkin is the pride of Kazakhstan. Of the 17 black American world champion boxers, including World Boxing Council (WBC) heavyweight champion Deontay Wilder and International Boxing Federation (IBF) welterweight champion Errol Spence Jr., it would be hard to argue that any of them fit the mold of “the American.” Thurman wants to “break the mold” of how audiences view black fighters. “Keith Thurman is not only an African American, but my mother’s white and my father’s black,” he said, referring to himself in the third person. “So, at the end of the day, when I step in the ring — and what I’m grateful for with the beautiful sport of boxing — I get to live out my dream. This is my American dream to be on this stage, to be on this platform, to make a living, to provide for my family. Every time I step in a ring, I wear red, white and blue because I’m proud to be an American. Not just an African American, but an American.” He’s asked if the color of his trunks will actually make fans view him as “the American” and not just the black (or the Mexican or the Polynesian or the …) boxer fighting the Philippines’ Pacquiao. “I am an American. He is a Filipino. I am a world champion. He is a legend. I believe, just like we have our freedoms, cheer for who you want to cheer for. Do your rah-rah with whoever you support. … All you have to do is cheer for the people that you want to succeed in life. If you’re the kind of person that, when you cheer for one you have to despise the other, so be it. Love me, hate Pacquiao. Love Pacquiao, hate me. We are your entertainment. We are the gladiators. For me, it ain’t nothing but another fight. It ain’t nothing but me living out a dream that I’ve always wanted to live. … Let the people have their opinion. Let the people do what the people want to do. The people crucified Jesus Christ. They were given a choice, but for them that was their entertainment at that time.” Kimberly Doehnert, Thurman’s aunt, trainer and nutritionist, said her nephew has been navigating the question of race his entire life and that hasn’t changed since he became a professional boxer. She’s had to argue with people that Thurman is actually black. “I had someone argue me down that my nephew wasn’t black,” she said. “ ‘He’s not black. His dad is Mexican, his mom is white.’ I’m like, ‘OK, it’s kind of funny because I know the man, his dad, because I’m his sister.’ ” There’s a “mystiqueness” about Thurman, she said, that makes him an enigma because people don’t know a lot about him. “It’s hard for them to figure him out.” Thurman works out for members of the media at the St. Pete Boxing Club in St. Petersburg, Florida, on July 10 before his July 20 bout vs. Pacquiao. “This is my American dream to be on this stage, to be on this platform, to make a living, to provide for my family,” Thurman said. His matchup with Pacquiao, however, has brought him more exposure than any fight before this. It will be Thurman’s first pay-per-view headline fight. “You’ve got people that are interested in Tiger Woods [at the Pebble Beach Pro-Am], and they have to constantly see an advertisement for Keith Thurman-Manny Pacquiao. You’ve got people that are cheering for the women’s soccer team, and they’re constantly seeing Keith Thurman-Manny Pacquiao,” he said. “This is one of the biggest fights of the whole year. This is one of the best fights, best matchups, all year.” No matter what American fans think of him, Thurman plans to use this fight as an opportunity to make himself a household name — American or not, black or not.
19 Jul 19
News Archives Uk

Romelu Lukaku was strongly linked to a move to Inter Milan this summer InterCoast chief Antonio Conte thinks Romelu Lukaku would improve his side, but acknowledges that he is opposed to Manchester United's striker. Inter is keen on the Belgian, but still has to meet United's rating for the player who cost £ 75m two […]

19 Jul 19
3 FURLONGS OUT

“Jockeys are like wine – some turn to vinegar, but the best improve with age”; Warrenpoint born rider Mark O’Hare fits perfectly in the category of improving with age. Now 38, O’Hare has one of the best positions in sport; of being one of the retained riders for seven times champion trainer Noel Meade. Speaking […]

19 Jul 19
Cristiano Ronaldo News

[ad_1] The Nerazzurri boss has admitted he has been a fan of the Belgian striker, but has been unsure if his club will sign the Manchester United forward Inter boss Antonio Conte has expressed his admiration for Manchester United striker Romelu Lukaku, who continues to be linked with a move to San Siro. The 26-year-old […]

19 Jul 19
The Sun
ANTHONY JOSHUA’S uncle labelled Andy Ruiz Jr as an “upset king” five years ago. The British superstar has vowed to bounce back after he was dethroned by the 25-1 outsider in New York on June 1. Andy Ruiz beat Anthony Joshua inside seven rounds in New York Joshua’s defeat to the 19st Mexican-American came as one of the biggest shocks in boxing history. The Watford bruiser was decked four times before referee Mike Griffin eventually waved the fight off before the end of the seventh round. But in 2014, AJ’s uncle predicted that Ruiz Jr would cause a stir in the heavyweight division. Speaking on his YouTube channel, Joshua said: “I remember years ago my uncle wrote out a list of all the heavyweights and next to Andy Ruiz Jr he wrote ‘upset king’ believe it or not. “This was around 2014 he gave me that list.” AJ has claimed that he got hit so hard during the fight that he did not know where he was. The former WBO, WBA and IBF champion added: “I couldn’t even really remember where I was at the time but I just knew that I was in for a fight. “I knew that I should be here [on the canvas], so I just got to my feet and we went again. “Ruiz done well, hit me with a good shot and I just couldn’t recover from it and that was it. ‘MY MIND WAS NOT THERE’ “My legs and everything, it’s like, it’s a weird feeling, but from there on I remember going back on the corner – can’t remember what I was saying. “I think it was from the fifth round I thought I was recovering, I would assume so as I started landing a few shots. “Slipping and sliding shots isn’t my forte, long range boxing, power shots is my forte so I was doing something isn’t my option one. “It’s probably my option three and it got me through to the seventh round and that was it.” “Boom got hit again, as you climb, the hole was getting deeper. “I don’t know, it shows that training went well, I was strong, I was fit – even though my mind was not there, my body was strong enough I kept on getting up. ” Joshua revealed that he thought the referee was putting his gum shield back in before he waved off the fight. And he has vowed to become the two-time heavyweight champion ahead of his rematch with Ruiz Jr.  He added: “I’ve always felt like the belts not representing, I’m always a man who stands alone and that’s why I say, I make boxing. [pod_component pod_component_config_id=”20190604-carousel-cMIuh0tiL” pod_component_config_url=”https://www.thesun.co.uk/nu-sun-pod-component-config-prod/20190604-carousel-cMIuh0tiL.json” pod_component_config_loader_url=”https://www.thesun.co.uk/nu-sun-pod-loaders-prod/1.62.2/componentLoader.js?84437″ src=”https%3A%2F%2Fiframe.thesun.co.uk%2Fnu-sun-pod-widgets-prod%2Fiframe-pod.html%3Fid%3D20190604-carousel-cMIuh0tiL%26script%3Dhttps%3A%2F%2Fwww.thesun.co.uk%2Fnu-sun-pod-loaders-prod%2F1.62.2%2FcomponentLoader.js%3F84437%26config%3Dhttps%3A%2F%2Fwww.thesun.co.uk%2Fnu-sun-pod-component-config-prod%2F20190604-carousel-cMIuh0tiL.json”] [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN BOXING ” posts_category=”331″ posts_number=”12″ query_type=”popular” /] “Boxing doesn’t represent me, I’m a man before I held those belts. I was a respectful person before I held those belts and I will always be the same person when I retire. “I don’t think you should give up when you meet a blip in life. I can get it right and that’s why I want to take this rematch and reactivated it immediately. “I’m still keen to fight the best in the world, I’m still keen to prove myself, my ambition in boxing at the minute is to be the two time heavyweight champion of the world.” Anthony Joshua was decked four times during the heavyweight showdown [bc_video video_id=”6059424085001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Watch awkward moment Anthony Joshua is asked by Nigerian girl why he boxes for Britain”]