Chicos

22 May 19

Diez días después de celebrarle a las mamás, en la comunidad atrás de la Laguna El Espino, escondidita en el extremo occidente, del país más pequeñito de América, era el momento de celebra el cumpleaños de Rogelito.   Rogelito no tenía mamá, tampoco tenía papá.

22 May 19
SoldelaPuna

Killadamente (Instagram) Nombre completo: Carol Acosta Edad: 21 País de origen: República Dominicana Ciudad de residencia: Nueva York Seguidores en Instagram: 7,1 millones Seudónimo: Killadamente (Killa en República Dominicana se le llama a una persona molesta) “Sabio es el que se ríe de sí mismo, porque nunca se queda sin cosas de las que reírse”, […]

22 May 19
Chico Enterprise-Record
CLEVELAND —  Frankie Montas pitched six scoreless innings and the A’s rode a 13-hit attack to top the Indians, 7-2, on Wednesday, extending their winning streak to six games. Catcher Nick Hundley and designated hitter Mark Canha homered as Oakland continued to get production throughout the batting order. Montas (6-2, 2.40) struck out nine, while allowing five hits and two walks. The right-hander threw 101 pitches — 64 strikes and 37 balls. The A’s have evened their record at 25-25. They are off Thursday, before hosting Seattle on Friday night to begin a nine-game homestand. The A’s completed the trip with a 6-2 record, beginning with two losses at Seattle. They then went to Detroit, where they won three games and led, 5-3, in Sunday’s series finale that was suspended after 6 1/2 innings. The game will be completed Sept. 6. Montas got out of jams in the first two innings. With runners on second and third and one out in the first, he fanned Jake Bauers on a 96 mile per hour fastball, then retired Jose Ramirez on a routine fly to left. Cleveland had runners on second and third with two out in the second, when Montas got Francisco Lindor on a swinging strikeout with a hard slider. Meanwhile, the A’s offense continued to flourish. indians starter and loser Jefry Rodriguez (1-4, 4.08) helped Oakland in the first, walking Marcus Semien, Matt Chapman and Matt Olson to load the bases. Then, third baseman Jose Ramirez — playing closer to the second base bag in an infield shift against left-handed hitting Canha — booted a Canha grounder for an error, scoring Semien. Robbie Grossman followed with a sacrifice fly.[related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”] Hundley put the A’s up, 3-0, in the second, with an opposite field homer to right, drilling a Rodriguez fastball for an opposite field homer to right, Hundley’s second homer of the season. Matt Olson drove the first of his two doubles, both off the walls in left center and then right center fields, in the third and scored on a Grossman single. Canha doubled home Matt Chapman, who had singled, in the fourthand slugged his seventh homer in the sixth. Ramon Laureano doubled and came home on Hundley’s double in the seventh for a 7-0 lead. Cleveland got its runs a two-run homer by Bauers, a 450-foot blast in the eighth off Fernando Rodney.      
22 May 19
Noticias Ultimas

El gerente de Tesco 'se niega a atender al cliente que estaba comprando un batido para una mujer sin hogar sedienta' Daniel Heard, de 40 años, fue confrontado por el trabajador en la tienda de Lincoln High Street. Se quedó 'disgustado por las acciones del gerente y ha lanzado una queja Regularmente compra comida para […]

22 May 19
Chico Enterprise-Record
[dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=warriors-hq” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] Kevin Durant is *extremely* online this week. For the second time in three days, Durant is going after Fox Sports 1’s Chris Broussard on Twitter. Broussard said on FS1’s Undisputed that he and KD had “texted for 2, 3 hours straight about life, about basketball, about media, about faith.” He said that he and Durant have pushed each other on their shared Christian faith. But Durant put Broussard on blast in a tweet of his own, saying the reporter does not even have his phone number. Cap. Cap. Cap cap cap….u don’t have my number mannnnn https://t.co/uJhQjR74Zr — Kevin Durant (@KDTrey5) May 22, 2019 Now, both things could be true: Maybe Durant and Broussard have sent direct messages back and forth on Twitter or Instagram. Maybe they’re Snapchat buddies. But it’s clear that “love-hate” relationship is featuring more of the latter this week. The Warriors’ star forward lashed out at Broussard Monday when the reporter said that Golden State winning a championship without him would be Durant’s “worst nightmare.” “I see a little exaggeration there buddy, my worst nightmare?? U sure that this is the worst that it can get???” Durant wrote. I see a little exaggeration there buddy, my worst nightmare?? U sure that this is the worst that it can get??? — Kevin Durant (@KDTrey5) May 20, 2019 Durant has been out with a calf strain for nearly two weeks now, and the Warriors still have a week left before their next game. The guy’s just trying to stay busy, and as we know he’s wont to entertain himself on social media from time to tome. Broussard said in Wednesday’s clip that their early Twitter scuffle hadn’t measured up to some of their past disagreements, as all good friends have. Maybe the more recent barbs will register on that scale of friendly arguments.[related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]
22 May 19
Redwood Times
Eureka isn’t ready to award a contract for the city’s marketing services. The Eureka City Council voted unanimously Tuesday night to postpone awarding a roughly $370,000 contract to local marketing company Humboldt Made as was recommended by a review panel primarily comprised of local business owners and city staff. The council decided instead that Mayor Susan Seaman will appoint a new panel that will conduct a third interview with Humboldt Made and its competitor for the bid, Roanoke, Virginia-based marketing firm Eddy Alexander. The council is set to vote on awarding the contract to one of the firms at its June 18 meeting. “Both candidates sound awesome,” Eureka City Councilwoman Kim Bergel said. “It was the process that was the problem in my mind.” Bergel said it was important to restore the public’s trust in the council because “the trust has been broken.” The process so far included a request for proposals that drew about a dozen proposals. A 10-member panel comprised of city staff, local business owners and community members ranked the proposals, after which Humboldt Made, Eddy Alexander and Chico-based MC2 rose to the top. After an initial round of interviews, Lane Millar, deputy director of development services, said the panel eliminated MC2 but decided they needed a second interview with specific criteria to pick between the top two. After a third interview, Humboldt Made narrowly came out in the lead. Many of the public comments at Tuesday night’s meeting revolved around the text messages between Rob Holmlund, the city’s director of development services, and Humboldt Made executive director Alanna Powell, and whether those text messages show that Powell received an unfair advantage in the bidding process. Holmlund, however, said he ranked Eddy Alexander higher during all parts of the process, but added that he thought the council ultimately made a good decision that will give them more recommendations from another set of people that can help them make their choice. “I think it’s really good for everyone to be this involved and to care this much about this topic,” Holmlund said. “It’s really important so, while it’s been difficult, I think ultimately it’s really good what’s happening for the city of Eureka.” Jackie McBeth, of Eureka, said through the course of the meeting that she felt Millar sounded biased in favor of Humboldt Made because it’s local and any other bidder wasn’t “going to have a chance.” “I like local, but at the same time this local company is sending the money out of town to San Francisco,” McBeth said. “So you’re not getting all local.” Humboldt Made was planning on contracting out its branding services to one of three firms in San Francisco, which Powell said understood their likely tourist base. McBeth said she wanted to see another panel done that didn’t include city staff. Patricia Callison of Eureka echoed McBeth’s sentiments in saying she had a problem with the amount of city staff on the review panel as well and the lack of longtime business owners. Several business owners also spoke at the meeting in support of Humboldt Made and what it has already done for the city and their businesses. Rosa Dixon, co-founder of gluten-free dessert company Natural Decadence, said she has a national brand with 98 percent of her sales coming from outside the area. Humboldt Made helped her do a total brand redesign for her packaging, Dixon said. “That was four years ago,” Dixon said. “And doing that full brand redesign has grown our business. We’re six times larger than we were.” Another question was the city of Eureka’s desired marketing audience. City Manager Greg Sparks told the council that majority of the visitors who come to the area, roughly 70 percent, are Californians. Councilwoman Heidi Messner said she was under the impression that the city was trying to market to a more global audience while Councilman Austin Allison said he was concerned with the perception of Eureka outsiders have and that a firm such as Eddy Alexander, which has worked with major corporations including Google, Disney and Best Western, could help flip that perception. “Jennifer Eddy, herself, is nationally certified in reputation and crisis management,” Allison said. “When we say that Eureka has a problem with our identity — or we’re having trouble forming a local and outside view of who we are — I can’t help but realize that perhaps it doesn’t always have to be a local choice in trying to help us.”
22 May 19
Times-Standard
Eureka isn’t ready to award a contract for the city’s marketing services. The Eureka City Council voted unanimously Tuesday night to postpone awarding a roughly $370,000 contract to local marketing company Humboldt Made as was recommended by a review panel primarily comprised of local business owners and city staff. The council decided instead that Mayor Susan Seaman will appoint a new panel that will conduct a third interview with Humboldt Made and its competitor for the bid, Roanoke, Virginia-based marketing firm Eddy Alexander. The council is set to vote on awarding the contract to one of the firms at its June 18 meeting. “Both candidates sound awesome,” Eureka City Councilwoman Kim Bergel said. “It was the process that was the problem in my mind.” Bergel said it was important to restore the public’s trust in the council because “the trust has been broken.” The process so far included a request for proposals that drew about a dozen proposals. A 10-member panel comprised of city staff, local business owners and community members ranked the proposals, after which Humboldt Made, Eddy Alexander and Chico-based MC2 rose to the top. After an initial round of interviews, Lane Millar, deputy director of development services, said the panel eliminated MC2 but decided they needed a second interview with specific criteria to pick between the top two. After a third interview, Humboldt Made narrowly came out in the lead. Many of the public comments at Tuesday night’s meeting revolved around the text messages between Rob Holmlund, the city’s director of development services, and Humboldt Made executive director Alanna Powell, and whether those text messages show that Powell received an unfair advantage in the bidding process. Holmlund, however, said he ranked Eddy Alexander higher during all parts of the process, but added that he thought the council ultimately made a good decision that will give them more recommendations from another set of people that can help them make their choice. “I think it’s really good for everyone to be this involved and to care this much about this topic,” Holmlund said. “It’s really important so, while it’s been difficult, I think ultimately it’s really good what’s happening for the city of Eureka.” Jackie McBeth, of Eureka, said through the course of the meeting that she felt Millar sounded biased in favor of Humboldt Made because it’s local and any other bidder wasn’t “going to have a chance.” “I like local, but at the same time this local company is sending the money out of town to San Francisco,” McBeth said. “So you’re not getting all local.” Humboldt Made was planning on contracting out its branding services to one of three firms in San Francisco, which Powell said understood their likely tourist base. McBeth said she wanted to see another panel done that didn’t include city staff. Patricia Callison of Eureka echoed McBeth’s sentiments in saying she had a problem with the amount of city staff on the review panel as well and the lack of longtime business owners. Several business owners also spoke at the meeting in support of Humboldt Made and what it has already done for the city and their businesses. Rosa Dixon, co-founder of gluten-free dessert company Natural Decadence, said she has a national brand with 98 percent of her sales coming from outside the area. Humboldt Made helped her do a total brand redesign for her packaging, Dixon said. “That was four years ago,” Dixon said. “And doing that full brand redesign has grown our business. We’re six times larger than we were.” Another question was the city of Eureka’s desired marketing audience. City Manager Greg Sparks told the council that majority of the visitors who come to the area, roughly 70 percent, are Californians. Councilwoman Heidi Messner said she was under the impression that the city was trying to market to a more global audience while Councilman Austin Allison said he was concerned with the perception of Eureka outsiders have and that a firm such as Eddy Alexander, which has worked with major corporations including Google, Disney and Best Western, could help flip that perception. “Jennifer Eddy, herself, is nationally certified in reputation and crisis management,” Allison said. “When we say that Eureka has a problem with our identity — or we’re having trouble forming a local and outside view of who we are — I can’t help but realize that perhaps it doesn’t always have to be a local choice in trying to help us.”
22 May 19
Chico Enterprise-Record
[dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=warriors-hq” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] Even as he nursed persistent pain in a toe in his right foot earlier in the regular season, Draymond Green initially insisted he felt fine to play. One of the main reasons: Green wanted to defend Milwaukee forward Giannis Antetokounmpo. Nearly six months after missing a pair of regular-season games against the Bucks, Green might receive his wish. The Warriors could face the Bucks in the NBA Finals on May 30. With the Bucks and Toronto Raptors facing a 2-2 tie in the Eastern Conference Finals, Green might have to wait again. Unlike how he felt during the regular season, though, Green has bigger ambitions than defending Antetokounmpo. Green simply wants to collect his fourth NBA championship in five years. “If that’s who I play, obviously you take that challenge on and you appreciate the challenge playing against a player who is as good as Giannis,” Green told Bay Area News Group. “But I don’t really care who we play. Whichever team we play, it’s going to be a good battle.” Yes it is. If the Warriors play Toronto, they will also have a heavy defensive assignment. How will the Warriors limit Raptors forward Kawhi Leonard, who ranks third in the NBA post-season scoring (31.2 points per game)? How will the Warriors stifle Toronto point guard Kyle Lowry, who ranks 10th in the league in post-season assists (6.4)? How will the Warriors account for the Raptors’ bigs in Marc Gasol and Pascal Siakam? Should the Bucks prevail, how will the Warriors prevent Antetokounmpo from either driving to the basket or posting up? How will the Warriors handle Khris Middleton’s outside shooting (43.9 percent in the playoffs)? How will the Warriors deal with the positional versatility that Nikola Mirotic and Brook Lopez have? Klay Thompson subscribes. You can too for just 11 cents a day for 11 months + receive a free Warriors Championship book. Sign me up! (Jose Carlos Fajardo/Bay Area News Group) “Both teams have great length. Both teams have really good defenders,” Green said. “They will create their challenges with whatever team we play. But I think we create some challenges for other teams as well. If we play our brand of basketball as I always say, I trust we’ll get the same results.” After all, Green has posted four of his eight career post-season triple doubles during this year’s NBA playoffs. Green became the first player in Warriors’ franchise history to make an NBA All-Defensive team for five consecutive seasons. Though Green had aspirations to win the league’s Defensive Player of the Year award for the second time in his seven-year career, Green’s 13-game absence during this season likely explains the exclusion. During that time, Green sat out of all of the Warriors’ regular-season matchups against Milwaukee and Toronto. In related news, the Warriors went 1-3 during that stretch. The Warriors recorded their second and third-worst defensive performances of the season, respectively, in a loss to Milwaukee on Nov. 8 (134-111) and Toronto on Nov. 29 (131-128 in overtime). In the Warriors’ first matchup against Milwaukee, Antetokounmpo had 24 points while going 7-of-16 from the field and 10-of-11 from the free-throw line. In the Warriors’ first matchup against Toronto, Leonard scored 37 points on a 14-of-24 clip. The Warriors rebounded on Dec. 7 with a win over the Bucks by holding them to a 7-of-39 mark from 3. Regardless, the Warriors sure wished Green was there to help. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”] “Draymond is a competitive guy. He loves those type of matchups. He’s the best defender in the league,” Warriors forward Kevon Looney said. “I feel way more comfortable with my defense when I got Draymond behind me. He takes our defense to another level. When we make mistakes, he usually covers it up.” The Warriors expect Green to do the same thing during the Finals. Unlike in the regular season, Green does not face any uncertainty on if he can suit up against either Milwaukee or Toronto. While Green reported feeling fully healthy, the Warriors will have nine days before playing in Game 1 against either the Bucks or the Raptors. Before then, the Warriors might have time for Kevin Durant (right calf), DeMarcus Cousins (left quadricep muscle) and Andre Iguodala (left calf) to heal their respective injuries. “It’s great for us to get these nine days where we don’t even have to think about ‘I’m missing a game’ or ‘I need to try to get out there,’” Green said. “We have nine days to keep working. Hopefully we can get those guys back into the fold.” Fortunately for the Warriors, Green already is. WARRIORS HQ PODCAST: Be sure to visit our podcast page at mercurynews.com. You can also get notified of new episodes on iTunes, Google Play Music, Spotify, Stitcher and SoundCloud.* * * Follow Bay Area News Group Warriors beat writer Mark Medina on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.
22 May 19
Chico Enterprise-Record
[dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=sharks-hq” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] ST. LOUIS — Joe Thornton wasn’t about to make any declarations about his future immediately after the Sharks lost the Western Conference Final to the St. Louis Blues. It’s possible, too, that no announcement will be forthcoming when the Sharks hold exit interviews later this week. No, Thornton, and general manager Doug Wilson, it seems, may need a bit of time to help figure out what’s next. A Sharks season that started with candid talk about winning the Stanley Cup will end with what could be one of the most turbulent summers in recent memory. Thornton is among seven Sharks players who are set to become unrestricted free agents this offseason, with four more players entering restricted free agency. In one form or another, change is coming. “Every year. I mean, you get used to the unfortunate part of the business,” said center Logan Couture, who will be one of the team’s cornerstones for years to come, on Tuesday night. “You play with guys for eight months. Every day, you got a schedule, you come to the rink, you see the guys, go on the road, and then it comes to an abrupt end. “You don’t know what to do with yourself, then changes are made.” For complete Sharks coveragefollow us on Flipboard. Among the players who may depart are captain Joe Pavelski, defenseman Erik Karlsson and forwards Gus Nyquist and Joonas Donskoi. Soon-to-be RFA’s Timo Meier and Kevin Labanc are coming off their entry-level contracts and at least in Meier’s case, will likely be due for a significant pay raise. Pavelski is coming off a 38-goal season, tied for second-most in his 13-year NHL career. He’s been the captain for four seasons, as coach Pete DeBoer referred to he and Thornton as the “heartbeat of this team.” DeBoer and Wilson both said during the season that Pavelski can be an effective NHL player for years to come. Thornton, who had 51 points in 73 games this season, will turn 40 on July 2, and Pavelski will turn 35 just nine days later. There has also reportedly been little dialogue between the Sharks and Pavelski’s camp regarding a new contract up until this point. The Sharks may want Pavelski back, but the cost, and particularly the term of a new deal, may be sticking points. A new deal for Karlsson also figures to be complex. When the Sharks first acquired Karlsson, it almost seemed assured that the two-time Norris Trophy winner’s next contract would be in the range of what Los Angeles Kings’ defenseman Drew Doughty received — eight years and $88 million. The Sharks, unless they trade exclusive negotiation rights, are the only team that can offer Karlsson an eight-year pact. Other teams, after July 1, can only offer seven-year deals. But Karlsson’s health issues this season could make teams wary about committing that amount of money. The upper limit of the NHL’s salary cap is projected to be around $83 million for next season, and a deal with an average annual value of $11 million would take up over 13 percent of that in the first season. Per CapFriendly, the Sharks already have over $58 million in contracts committed to 15 players for next season. Karlsson missed 27 of the Sharks’ final 33 regular season games with groin and leg injuries, but still had 45 points in 53 games. He played the first 19 playoff games at far less than full strength and still had 16 points. He can be a difference-maker of the highest order when he’s healthy. The Sharks just wished they would have seen more of the type of player he could be. SAN JOSE, CA – May 11: San Jose Sharks’ Erik Karlsson (65) clears the puck against St. Louis Blues’ Tyler Bozak (21) as Sharks goaltender Martin Jones (31) looks on in the first period in Game 1 of the NHL hockey Stanley Cup Western Conference finals at the SAP Center in San Jose, Calif., on Saturday, May 11, 2019. (Anda Chu/Bay Area News Group) “Maybe the best defenseman in the world, or in that conversation,” DeBoer said of Karlsson. “We had him healthy for six weeks and dialed in. The first two months of the season, he was getting used to us, two and a half, I thought he got dialed … and we were maybe the best team in the league in that stretch. And then he wasn’t healthy again.” The Sharks should be able to bring back Donskoi, 27, if they so choose at a reasonable price. He is coming off a two-year deal worth $3.8 million. Nyquist, 29, is coming off a career season with 60 points in 81 games between the Sharks and Red Wings. Reportedly, before he was traded to the Sharks, he was seeking a deal upward of $5 million per season. Once Meier’s new deal is done, and if Karlsson and Pavelski re-sign, there may not be much room left over for a new deal for Nyquist. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]One way or another, the Sharks will look different next season. “Some of the guys you may not see until you play them the next season,” Couture said. “So it’s the worst part of playing in this league. There are many positives. That’s probably the biggest negative. But we expect there are going to be changes and right now it’s just too early to think about it.”
22 May 19
Chico Enterprise-Record
Ronnie Lott watched the Warriors punch their ticket to the NBA Finals on Monday. His appreciation for that triumphant moment came from a place that most of us will never visit. See, Lott was one of the architects and caretakers of the 49ers dynasty. His 49ers won four Super Bowls in nine years. The Warriors are gunning for their fourth NBA title in five years. Not to mention a three-peat. “That doesn’t happen,” said Lott during an appearance on KNBR’s “Tolbert & Lund” show. “We tried. Got close. But that is a hard, hard journey.” Lott told the KNBR audience that he was “a big Celtics fan” as a kid. Perhaps that’s when his fascination for mega-champions was cultivated. “I saw some great teams over the years,” he said. “The Lakers. The Bulls. They did all the right things, all the things you have to do to win.” He said that on Monday, “I was sitting there going, ‘These guys are good. They’re just freaking good,’ To go five times?” Little-known fact: Lott had a cameo with the USC basketball team in the 1979-80 season. He scored four points and was called for 10 fouls. Sounds about right, the way he played safety. Back to talk of dynasties. Once upon a century, UCLA basketball coach John Wooden put together his pyramid of success comprised of overarching themes (Industriousness, Team Spirit) as well as specific traits. On top of that he had a wellspring of hoops homilies: “Be quick, but don’t hurry.” “Do not let what you cannot do interfere with what you can do.” Lott’s thoughts on enduring champions are more visceral. For him, winning was a mindset. It was mastery of the moment. Asked about the advantage of having been in a big spot before, Lott answered: “You start to get certain things done that nobody else can get done. You find yourselves in those moments where a lot of people fall apart. There are winners and losers for a lot of reasons. A lot of times you lose because you don’t know how to deal with the situation, or the moment. “There are certain things that this group of (Warriors) have been able to achieve that a lot of other guys can’t. In the fourth quarter, when you’ve got to win, you’ve got to make it happen, when you’ve got to figure it out, I think that’s what made Joe Montana who he is.” Lott recalled another childhood memory in which “kids used to say, ‘Can you be Robin Hood?’ As a kid you would just sit there and you would go, ‘How does Robin Hood, every time, hit the apple?’ And the reason he hit the apple was he was the best.” Ethereal, but entertaining. “That’s what I see when I watch this (Warriors) group,” Lott said. “There were moments (Monday) night, the rebounding that they got in the fourth quarter was just out-hustling, outworking (the Trail Blazers). It was like, ‘I want it more than you.’ You could see it.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]Lott did have one piece of practical, if earthy, advice to would-be champions. “I tell people this all the time,” he said. “Man, when your (rear end) is tight, it’s hard to function.”
22 May 19
Chico Enterprise-Record
Klay Thompson, lauded for his defense throughout his eight-year NBA career, was finally honored for it Wednesday by landing on the All-Defensive team for the first time. The Warriors’ five-time All-Star guard was voted onto the All-Defensive second team, where he was joined by teammate Draymond Green, who made the prestigious team for the fifth time in his career. Bucks forward Giannis Antetokounmpo, Jazz center Rudy Gobert and Thunder forward Paul George, the three finalists for the NBA Defensive Player of the Year award to be revealed June 24, were the leading vote-getters on the first team with nearly identical voting totals. Gobert had 196 points, including 97 first-team votes, to land on the first team for the third straight year. George had 195 points and 96 first-team votes and Antetokounmpo, a first-time first-teamer, had 193 points and 94 first-team votes. Celtics guard Marcus Smart (145 points, 63 for first team) and Bucks guard Eric Bledsoe (100 points, 36 for first team) rounded out the All-Defensive first team. Thompson finished 18 points behind Bledsoe as Klay tallied 82 points, including 23 for first team. Thompson told reporters in March that making the All-Defensive team would mean a lot to him. “It’s always been a goal of mine. I pride myself on playing on both sides of the ball,” Thompson said a couple of months ago. “It would be awesome to make All-Defensive team before it’s all said and done.” Mission accomplished. Perhaps no one understands Thompson’s impact on defense for the Warriors more than his coach, Steve Kerr. “He’s always been the guy for us who takes the challenge of being on the ball and dealing with all of those pick and rolls, fighting over the top and being physical or even switching onto a big,” Kerr said recently of his 6-foot-7 guard. “That’s a pretty big and unique skillset defensively.” Green, the NBA’s Defensive Player of the Year in 2016-17, is a second-team honoree for the second time. Green, who had two first-team votes and 57 second-team votes for 61 points, has been a first-teamer three times in his seven-year career. The All-Defensive teams were picked by a panel of 100 sportswriters and broadcasters, with players receiving two points for a first-team vote and one point for a second-team pick. Voters chose two guards, two forwards and a center on each All-Defensive team. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”] Warriors star guard Stephen Curry received one vote for first team and All-Star teammate Kevin Durant got four votes for second team. Andre Iguodala got a second-team vote at guard and little-used reserve forward Jordan Bell surprisingly received a second-team vote. Perhaps more surprising than Curry’s first-team vote was Rockets guard James Harden, who has been criticized for his defense in the past, receiving two first-team votes. Thompson and Green were joined on the second team by Raptors forward Kawhi Leonard (39 points), Pelicans guard Jrue Holiday (90 points) and 76ers center Joel Embiid (80 points).
22 May 19
Chico Enterprise-Record
ALAMEDA — It happened about midway through the lone practice open to the media at the Raiders four-day organized team activity. Amid the drizzle and cloud cover Tuesday, quarterback Derek Carr produced a rainbow, a perfect pass some 50 yards in the air which dropped into the waiting arms of Tyrell Willliams, who had gotten past the last line of defense. “It’s nice to hit that on the first day, especially just to be able to catch one and get in the end zone,” Williams said. “It’s exciting. Hopefully we’ve got a lot more coming with that.” One deep shot doesn’t mean the Raiders are bringing back the days of Daryle Lamonica to Warren Wells. But there were a few other Carr throws that were probing the last line of defense, including a downfield dime on a wheel route to running back Jalen Richard. Carr was ready for the first query about the deep throw. He’s heard the talk that he’s too conservative and not attack-oriented enough. “Contrary to popular belief, I like throwing it down the field,” Carr said. “We’re pretty good at it here. To be able to do that today — I do that to mess with you guys — we had fun.” For complete Oakland Raiders coverage follow us on Flipboard. Williams, at 6-foot-4, 215 pounds, doesn’t arrive with the publicity or bombast of Antonio Brown, acquired from the Pittsburgh Steelers. Yet he was a significant acquisition, signing for four years and a maximum of $44.3 million as an unrestricted free agent from the Los Angeles Chargers. Over the past three seasons, Williams has been one of the top downfield receivers in the NFL with 153 receptions for 2,440 yards and 16 touchdowns, an average of 15.9 yards per catch. Williams is fast enough to get open deep and big enough to win jump-ball situations against smaller defensive backs. When Carr wants to take a shot downfield, Williams is about as safe as it gets. Tyrell Williams victimizes the Raiders’ David Amerson in 2016. “We like to go down the field and I feel like that’s one of my strong points is stretching the field,” Williams said. “I think that will be big for me to be able to get a lot of coverages that go to A.B (Brown) so I feel like I’ll get a lot of one-on-one coverage down the field. It’ be big for myself.” Gruden’s reputation is that he prefers to pile up the short completions, work the ball down the field. His system should mesh perfectly with Brown, who is adept at run-after-catch routes and hitting seams. In truth, 40 yards is 40 yards — whether it’s a catch-and-run or a pass that sails that distance in the air. And the less time the ball is in the air, the fewer chances for a defender to make a play on the ball. Carr’s career best of 7.3 yards per attempt last season had a lot to do with his 68.9 percent completion percentage, also a career high There was grumbling among the fan base for throwing short of the stake and utilizing check-downs too often. It didn’t help that the Raiders most reliable receiver, Jordy Nelson, had gone from explosive threat to cagey veteran who worked well underneath but whose downfield speed was limited. Gruden’s vision with Brown and Williams is to have the best of both worlds with the ability to turn short throws into big gains and long throws into even bigger ones. “A lot of football today is run-pass options where you stretch the team laterally,” Gruden said. “You’re running bubble screens and fly sweeps, but you also have to stretch them vertically. If you can stretch the field vertically and horizontally, you become a much more difficult offense to defend. That;’s a goal that we have had here as we put together our team.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]NOTES — Erik Swoope, a tight end who played basketball in college at Miami, signed with the Raiders, according to ESPN. Swoope has 23 receptions for 384 yards and four touchdowns for Indianapolis from 2015 to 2018. — Brown, who did not attend the first day of organized team activities on the day of media access, was on the field during the closed session Wednesday. The Raiders posted a photo of Brown at practice on their Twitter feed and Brown did the same on his Instagram account. Like our Oakland Raiders Facebook page for more Raiders news, commentary and conversation.