Chicos

23 Jan 19
Niles & C.C

by IvanaBgood (IvanaBgood@aol.com) Fran smiles happily as she traipses down the hallway in 3 inch heels, now that she was pregnant she thought it best to be cautious. She taps gently on the office door, “Knock, knock.” Maxwell looks up, his mouth curving into a blissful grin, his eyes crinkle as he watches his wife […]

23 Jan 19
Chico Enterprise-Record
The Community Action Agency of Butte County, Inc., North State Food Bank, will hold a Tailgate Food Giveway from 9 a.m.-noon Friday at the Masonic Lodge, 1110 W. East Ave., Chico. Shelf stable food items like pasta, canned food, toiletries and other items will be distributed while supplies last. Representatives from the Agency will assist the public with information about other Community Action Agency programs available. For further information or questions, call 712-2883.
23 Jan 19
marcellofcosta

Contei meus anos e descobri que terei menos tempo para viver daqui para frente do que já vivi até agora. Sinto-me como aquele menino que ganhou uma bacia de jabuticabas. As primeiras, ele chupou displicente, mas percebendo que faltam poucas, rói o caroço. Já não tenho tempo para lidar com mediocridades. Não quero estar em […]

23 Jan 19
Online Casino Reviewer

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23 Jan 19
ABCtlx.com

El club azulgrana acuerda la contratación del centrocampista holandés del Ajax, de 21 años, por 75 millones más 11 en variables El Barcelona ha anunciado este miércoles el fichaje del centrocampista holandés Frenkie de Jong (Arkel, Países bajos; 21 años). El club azulgrana pagará al Ajax por 75 millones de euros, más 11 en variables, […]

23 Jan 19
Online Casino Reviewer

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23 Jan 19
Chico Enterprise-Record
MOBILE, Ala. — John Lynch and Kyle Shanahan won’t be taking any of their players this week at No. 2 overall, but with a pick each in Rounds 2, 3 and 4 during April’s draft an intriguing South squad crop gives the 49ers options for the later rounds if they choose to dip into their Senior Bowl evaluations. Here are five players on the South team this week who might be interesting selections on draft day. South Carolina WR Deebo Samuel Clemson head coach Dabo Swinney told NFL Network Tuesday that one player he’s thankful to not play against anymore is Samuel, the speedy Gamecocks wideout who broke onto the scene his senior year. After catching only five touchdowns in his first three seasons at South Carolina, Samuel reeled in 11 his senior season to go along with 62 catches and 882 receiving yards. He also returned 23 kicks with a 24.8 yards per return average his senior year, and set the SEC record for most kick returns for touchdowns in a career with with four, one his sophomore year, two his junior year and one his senior year. Clemson WR Hunter Renfrow Renfrow has finally exhausted his college eligibility, and the two-time national champion could be mid-to-late-round steal for an NFL team in need of a slot receiver. Looking at Renfrow during Tuesday morning’s weigh-ins you’d think he was a reporter who snuck onto stage, but the 23-year-old caught 186 passes for 2,133 yards and 15 touchdowns during his Clemson career. Might he be a late-round option for the 49ers, who certainly need help at wideout? Mississippi State DE Montez Sweat Sweat won’t go as high as No. 2, but he’s probably the best non-quarterback pro prospect in Mobile this week. He stands a massive 6-foot-6 and 252 pounds, and he seems to fall right behind the elite defensive line crop of Nick Bosa, Josh Allen, Clelin Ferrell and Quinnen Williams. Sweat tallied 30 tackles for loss and 22.5 sacks over his final two college seasons. He might be a 49ers target if they trade back from No. 2, but he won’t fall all the way to the early second round. Sweat led Mississippi State’s nation-best defense along with defensive tackle Jeffery Simmons and safety Johnathan Abram, and this rep from Tuesday’s practice showed why his stock is rising this week. Oh Montez is *strong* strong 💪🏼 pic.twitter.com/fHywgGKCkC — The Draft Network (@DraftNetworkLLC) January 22, 2019 Louisiana Tech DE Jaylon Ferguson Ferguson, like Sweat, probably won’t be available when the 49ers pick in the second round and he won’t go in the top five. But the small-school prospect is an intriguing one who said Tuesday he tries to model his game after Khalil Mack. Whoever picks him probably wouldn’t mind if he’s even near the caliber of the Bears’ All-Pro defensive end. He’ll likely be a first-rounder if he shows well in Mobile and Indianapolis at the combine, thanks in part to 67.5 tackles for loss in college and 45 sacks, including 26 and 17.5, respectively, his senior season. Mississippi State S Johnathan Abram As aforementioned, Abram was a key cog in the Bulldogs’ No. 1 defense. With the 49ers needing safety help, Abram is a viable option in the early second round if 49ers coaches like what they see this week. Abram spent 2015 at Georgia before transferring and sitting out 2016. He logged nine tackles for loss, three sacks, two interceptions and five passes defensed his senior season.
23 Jan 19
Mighty Casey Baseball

<— JANUARY 22     JANUARY 24 —> BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENTS: 1855 Art Croft 1867 Bill Bowman 1873 Francis L. (Red) Donahue 1875 Carney Flynn 1879 Ed Kippert 1880 Wirt Virgin (Rip) Cannell 1882 Fred Winchell 1887 Mack Allison 1890 Bill Morley 1890 Ed Barney 1891 Charles Bernard (King) Lear 1891 Orie Kerlin 1891 Raymond Haley 1896 […]

23 Jan 19
Kevin Neilson Photography

I love my job. I’m often outdoors, And I get to meet new people. Like this family from Redwood City. We met at McClellan Ranch in Cupertino for a family session. It’s quickly becoming one of my favorite locations. Like me, Mom is a Chico State grad. Go Wildcats! Baby’s eyes are distant-mountain blue. Splendid, […]

23 Jan 19
Pallet & Plate

An introduction to the chile-obsessed foodways of America’s Sunbelt Ask anyone from Providence, or Boise, or Charleston about, say, fajitas and queso, and they’ll quickly recognize the staple dishes of Tex-Mex. But for whatever reason, the foods of the Southwest — which, for our purposes, includes New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, Utah, and Nevada — haven’t […]

23 Jan 19
Another Time in This Place

The presence of Francisco Laforet in Rio Colorado drew other trappers and traders to settle in this valley. One of the most colorful, and famous, of these was Charles Autobees, who had many wives and many ways of spelling his last name (Ortibi, Otterby, Ortubus, Ortivis, and Hortuvis being just a few of them). He […]

23 Jan 19
Chico Enterprise-Record
MOBILE, Ala. — It’s been almost two decades. Seventeen years and four days to exact. And Jon Gruden’s frustration, anger, whatever you want to call it, has not wavered. He’ll never get over the Tuck Rule Game. Would you? Everyone knows the tale: Charles Woodson knocking the ball loose from Tom Brady’s right hand in the 2001 AFC Divisional Round with the Raiders up 13-10 and 1:50 remaining in the driving snow. Greg Biekert pouncing on the loose ball. The Raiders thinking they had sealed a trip to the AFC Championship. The refs eventually ruling a ball seemingly tucked into Brady’s chest was actually an incomplete pass. The Patriots going on to win in overtime, thus jumpstarting a dynasty. This past Sunday, the Saints lost a playoff game in similar crushing fashion because of a rules controversy. Rams cornerback Nickell Robey-Coleman committed blatant pass interference on Saints receiver TommyLee Lewis with less than two minutes left on third-and-10 in a 20-20 game and the Saints in the red zone. A penalty would’ve given New Orleans a first down, and a fast track to a game-winning field goal close to triple zeroes. Instead, the Saints kicked a field goal, leaving the Rams enough time to tie the game and eventually win in overtime. So on Monday, sharing the common thread of devastating playoff losses in part due to questionable calls, Gruden hopped on the phone with Saints coach Sean Payton. “That’s one of the reasons Sean and I talked,” Gruden said Tuesday at the Senior Bowl. “What do you say to your team? It’s tough. If you lose a game like that, it’s tough. It’s tough to lose period. Somebody had to lose unfortunately. Just a shame to come down to that. “I’m not gonna get into what we talked about. Sean and I worked together a long time ago. I was involved in a game, in a playoff game, that ended in quite dramatic fashion and so has he now. He and I will have a couple hot dogs and a couple glasses of Coke here and talk about things in the future, I’m sure.” Woodson might join them for that meal. He’ll clearly never get over that fateful day, either. I want all the people that tell me to get over the #tuckrule to tell drew Bree’s and the @Saints to get over that pass interference that wasn’t called that would have most likely ended the game in a saints win. I’ll wait — Charles Woodson (@CharlesWoodson) January 20, 2019 Gruden was told about Sunday’s game triggering Woodson. He chuckled. “Yeah,” Gruden said. “I’m sure it did.” Gruden wouldn’t touch the topic of whether a blatant missed call like that should be reviewable. He holds strong feelings about instant replay and has expressed them in the past, but insisted that venting session wouldn’t come Tuesday in Mobile. “I don’t know what the ramifications of that are gonna be,” Gruden said. “We all saw it. We all know there will be some action taken, I’m sure.” Back at his introductory press conference a little over one year ago, Gruden mentioned the Tuck Rule Game. Woodson was in attendance that day at Raiders HQ, and Gruden made it clear he had unfinished business with the team after his last game coaching the Raiders ended in such controversial fashion. That frustration still rings strong a year later as he embarks on Year 2 with the Raiders, and this is clearly a grudge Gruden will hold forever. Raiders fans and former players might, too, and you can’t blame them. “You don’t ever get over that,” Gruden said. “It’s the last time that team will ever be together. It’ll never be the same. Those guys fought as long and hard as they could and it’ll sting forever.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]  
23 Jan 19
Chico Enterprise-Record
Storms that soaked California during the first half of January did more than bring tons of snow to Sierra Nevada ski resorts. They also helped to significantly boost the state’s water supplies. Over the three weeks from Jan. 1 until this Tuesday, 47 key reservoirs that state water officials closely monitor added 580 billion gallons of water — as much as roughly 9 million people use in a year, according to an analysis by this newspaper. The combined storage in the reservoirs, which include critical components of California’s water supply like Shasta Lake, Folsom, Hetch Hetchy and San Luis Reservoir, has expanded from 15.96 million acre feet on New Year’s Day to 17.74 million acre feet now. Each acre foot is enough water to flood an acre of land a foot deep, or 325,851 gallons. Nearly all of the major reservoirs around California are now at or above their historical averages, swelled by runoff that continues to pour in from brimming creeks, rivers and rising water tables. Meanwhile, the statewide Sierra Nevada snow pack, which provides about one-third of California’s water, on Tuesday was at 114 percent of normal, up from just 69 percent on Jan. 1. “January brought us some good snow and precipitation,” said Chris Orrock, a spokesman for the state Department of Water Resources. “We’re hoping for more of the same in February and March.” How much water has been captured? Shasta Lake near Redding, the state’s largest reservoir, at 35 miles long, has risen 25 feet since Jan. 1, and is now 61 percent full, or 92 percent of its historical average for this time of year. Closer to the Bay Area, San Luis Reservoir between Gilroy and Los Banos has risen 15 feet over the past three weeks, and is now 82 percent full, or 109 percent of its historical average. To be sure, the rain has stopped. Dry, balmy weather is forecast over the next week from the Bay Area to Los Angeles, with more rain possible the first few days of February. This month’s wet weather could give way to sunny, warm conditions through the rest of the winter. But for now, the powerful atmospheric river storm that roared in from the Pacific Ocean last week, following other storms and dumping half a foot of rain in some places, and five feet of snow in the Sierra, has washed away a disappointing November and December. The trend is boosting the spirits of water managers, whose memories are still fresh of California’s brutal five-year drought from 2012 to 2017. Across the Bay Area, water agencies say their supplies are in good shape, and they are not expecting summer shortages. “It looks like a normal winter now. And normal is good,” said Toby Goddard, water conservation manager for the city of Santa Cruz. “January has been a nice boost.” Loch Lomond Reservoir, the main storage source for Santa Cruz, was 95 percent full on Tuesday afternoon, having gone up 7 feet since Jan. 1, when it was 83 percent full. In the East Bay, the seven reservoirs owned by the East Bay Municipal Utility District, which serves 1.5 million people in Alameda and Contra Costa counties, were 81 percent full. “At this point our supply looks healthy. We’re very happy to be where we are,” said Nelsy Rodriguez, a spokeswoman for East Bay MUD. Nearby, Los Vaqueros Reservoir, the biggest lake owned by the Contra Costa Water District, which provides water to 500,000 people, was 93 percent full Tuesday. In the North Bay, the seven reservoirs owned by the Marin Municipal Water District were 95 percent full, up from 72 percent on Jan. 1, with five spilling over this week. And in Santa Clara County, groundwater levels in the northern part of the county have recovered to pre-drought conditions, and in the agriculturally heavy South County are nearly there, said Marty Grimes, a spokesman for the Santa Clara Valley Water District. The districts’ 10 reservoirs were 42 percent full Tuesday, up from 24 percent on New Year’s Day, and 84 percent of the historical average. But Grimes noted that the district through the year lowers its reservoirs to recharge groundwater, a system that most other Bay Area water agencies don’t have. “There’s a lot of winter left to go, but at this point, our early prediction is that we’ll end the year with good groundwater levels which means we wouldn’t have any water shortages in the summer,” he said. Nicasio Reservoir is ready for more rain in Nicasio, Calif. on Friday, Dec. 14, 2018. (James Cacciatore/Marin Independent Journal) The district continues to ask for voluntary 20 percent conservation from 2013 water use totals. Last year, county residents achieved 19 percent. This week is an important winter milestone, water experts say. On average, half of California’s annual precipitation falls in December, January and February. With that span now half over for this winter season, Jay Lund, director of the Center for Watershed Sciences at UC-Davis, noted that one key water indicator is exactly halfway full. The eight-station Sierra Nevada Index, a daily report that measures how much precipitation has fallen in eight key watersheds near some of the largest reservoirs in Northern California, has so far received 26 inches this winter, Lund noted. The historic average is 52 inches. “We are on track to average, which is good. The historical average is better than the recent average,” Lund joked, referring to the five-year drought. Lund noted that one of the state’s primary reservoirs, Oroville, still hasn’t fully recovered from a  disaster two years ago. In February, 2017, the spillway at Oroville Dam, the tallest dam in the United States, crumbled during heavy storms, and authorities evacuated 188,000 residents, fearing an uncontrolled release of water. On Tuesday, despite the lake level having risen 39 feet in the past three weeks, Oroville was only 37 percent full, or 57 percent of its historical average. State officials have kept it low during repairs. One trend of note this year: Southern California has received significant rain after several years of lagging behind the north. While San Francisco’s rainfall was 87 percent of the historical average through Tuesday, Los Angeles’ was at 147 percent. There’s plenty of winter left, said Orrock, with the state Department of Water Resources. “We’re only about halfway through our three wettest months,” he said. “We have to wait and see what Mother Nature brings us for the rest of the winter. The only thing constant about California’s climate is that it’s so variable.” Mercury News researcher Leigh Poitinger contributed to this report.
23 Jan 19
Rock City Eats

When times get tough, it’s easy to see who the good people are. It’s been increasingly apparent in two different stories this week. First, Trio’s Restaurant chef and owner Capi Peck has been leading a drive to provide food for the TSA employees who are currently working without pay at the Little Rock aiport during […]