Citizen Drive

20 Feb 19
San Antonio Tea Party

Republished from TheRivardReport.com, by Iris Dimmick, February 16, 2019. Image credit: SATP / covered by license. Contributor: Don Krebs. San Antonio voters will see nine names on the ballot for mayor when they cast them during early voting, April 22-30, and on election day, May 4. The Rivard Report reached out to each candidate for […]

20 Feb 19
Kate Fox. Writer, Broadcaster and Performer: Where There's Muck, There's Bras.

Quantum physicist Max Planck knew a thing or two about new scientific paradigms- some of his discoveries, based on observations, meant that classical theories about thermodynamics had to be reconstructed from the ground up. He said “New scientific truth does not triumph by convincing its opponents and making them see the light, but rather because its […]

20 Feb 19
D.T.R.O.O.W.

All rights belong to Expedia. The Portuguese capital, Lisbon, lies on the western Iberian Peninsula, where the Tagus River meets the Atlantic Ocean. Settled almost 3,000 years ago, the city predates Rome, Paris, and London by centuries, and possesses an epic narrative to match. From its early days as a Phoenician outpost, to its expansion […]

20 Feb 19
Bacchus

Citizen Eco-Drive Men’s Promaster Depth Meter Chronograph 50mm Watch BJ2115-07E – Buy – Citizen Eco-Drive Men’s Promaster Depth Meter Chronograph 50mm Watch BJ2115-07E

20 Feb 19
The Frustrated Nester

A few weeks ago (before end-of-winter illnesses and school holidays) we were invited to Esbjerg’s rådhus – city hall – for a welcome event with the mayor. I went along with the kids, despite somehow thinking that after 6 months of living here I barely felt like a welcome was necessary. (Only a serial expat would […]

20 Feb 19
Truth2Freedom's Blog

James Howard Kunstler 1 hour ago The author is a prominent American social critic, blogger, and podcaster, and one of our all-time favorite pessimists. We carry his articles regularly on RI. His writing on Russia-gate has been highly entertaining. He is one of the better-known thinkers The New Yorker has dubbed ‘The Dystopians’ in an excellent 2009 profile, along with the brilliant Dmitry Orlov, […]

20 Feb 19
Lake County Record-Bee
UKIAH—In the wake of last year’s northern California fires, Joyce Paterson of Ukiah purchased a Tesla Model 3 electric vehicle. “This might sound altruistic, but I thought there was little I could do personally about global warming except that I could drive a car that doesn’t pollute.  That was a big factor for me in buying an electric car,” Paterson said. She is one of 237 residents of Mendocino County who own a fully-electric car as of January, 2018.  Another 414 residents own plug-in hybrids like Toyota Prius and Chevy Volt. Yet an additional 2,329 county residents own one of the many offerings of hybrid gas vehicles that boost mileage with an onboard battery charged through the gasoline motor. In total, almost 3,000 vehicles registered in Mendocino Counties have batteries that either eliminate or reduce emissions. All plug-in electric vehicles (PHEV) rely upon charging stations for “refueling.” With growing sales and the need for more charging stations in mind, the Ukiah City Council will consider approving at its Wednesday, Feb. 20, meeting a rebate program for homeowners and businesses to offset the cost of purchase and installation of electric vehicle (EV) charging stations. “Ukiah and the County are part of an overall state and national trend toward increased sales of electric vehicles, and we want to respond to and support that trend by offering rebates on charging infrastructure,” said Mel Grandi, Ukiah’s electric utility director. If approved by the city council, $500 rebates would be available to homeowners for stand-alone or wall-mounted 240-volt chargers, and up to $4,000 in rebates would be available to businesses that install two-hose 240-volt chargers. Grandi estimates first-year rebates will total around $30,000. Once approved, rebates will be available in March, with recently purchased charging stations grandfathered in from as early as January, 2019. California leads the nation with 60 percent of total EV sales as of the first 10 months of 2018, according to information provided to Ukiah City Council by Grandi’s office.  With more than a million electric vehicles on the road already, California will meet its goal of 1.5 million electric vehicles sold in the state by 2025, and before Governor Jerry Brown left office he set a new goal of five million EVs sold by 2030.  Experts say that goal may be tough to meet unless there is a boost in investment in charging infrastructure. In Ukiah, electricity as a substitute for gasoline is clean. Ukiah is in the top 10 cleanest of 482 cities in California, Grandi said, with geothermal, hydropower, natural gas and solar providing the bulk of electric power to citizens. Ukiah exceeds state mandates for carbon-free power, so it is able to sell some of its excess carbon and renewable energy credits on the state’s cap-and-trade market and use proceeds to fund programs such as rebates for electric car charging stations. The sale of Ukiah’s carbon credits helps provide funding to develop green carbon free resources in the future, Grandi noted. Like Paterson, many buyers of electric vehicles want to reduce their carbon footprint and help slow climate change—as well as save money on fuel. According to the Energy Information Administration (EIA), carbon emissions from the transportation sector are now the greatest source of carbon emissions that contribute to climate change. As demand for zero emission cars rises, automakers have responded with new models, lower battery cost and greater range.  More than 25 different models of EV and plug-in hybrid electric cars are now on offer, and auto manufacturers have announced more than 70 models in development, city council background information stated. While urban cities promote EVs as a zero-emission transportation pathway to cleaner air, in Mendocino County where air is already fairly clean but gasoline fuel relatively expensive, the cars significantly reduce the cost of driving.  The most efficient electric vehicles have an EPA fuel efficiency rating of 124 miles per gallon equivalent (MPGe). According to information provided to the City Council, home EV 240-volt level-two chargers that would qualify for City rebates can cost $600 to $1,200, and installation can double that amount.  Level-two chargers can “fill” a battery in four to eight hours.  Workplace level-two chargers with two nozzles that would qualify for the City rebate can cost $6,000 to $7,000, and installation costs several thousand more.  A building permit is required for installation. Like 80 percent of EV owners, Paterson charges her Tesla at home. She sets the device to begin charging at 9 p.m. during off-peak hours. When she volunteers at the Ukiah library, she parks her Tesla at the bank of eight Tesla-installed charging stations downtown for a quick fill-up. The Tesla charging stations in downtown Ukiah have been very successful, charging up to 800 cars per month, said Grandi, adding, “The numbers have been steadily increasing over time.” At the Oak street parking lot A, the Ukiah Electric Utility or City plans to replace two older chargers with four 240-volt “universal” pay charging stations. The new universal stations will be able to refuel any plug in electric vehicle including Teslas.
20 Feb 19
Lake County Record-Bee
LAKE COUNTY— Citizens Caring for Clearlake (CC4C) is a non-profit all volunteer network created to rid Clearlake of litter and blight. We share the gratifying experience of promoting and sustaining the beauty of Clearlake through education and volunteer action all the while creating new friendships and having fun. While most of our clean ups are done in the city of Clearlake, we do venture outside of our town and are happy to share our experiences with all of Lake County to beautify all around the lake. All can be involved in cleaning up their community.  Our large volunteer community helps in whatever way they can, when they can. Some who are not able to walk the streets or creek beds are able to contribute in other ways (creating fliers and helping out at fundraising events; helping educate the community; planting flowers, etc.).  Volunteers are all ages, from all backgrounds and have one common goal – clean up and beautify our city! CC4C also works in conjunction with the Public Works department, city leaders, city and county Code Enforcement, C&S Waste Solutions, local schools, and others to join forces to clean up. Our vision is to create a pristine and beautiful environment supported by the entire community of Clearlake, but ideally to clean up all of Lake County! Join us at the upcoming Town Hall meetings around the lake where CC4C volunteers will share stories, answer questions about how we began and continue to operate, and informing the public how to start groups in their own communities to work together. All are invited to attend to get information or possibly be involved in starting a local group to begin clean ups. The Town Hall meetings will be held on the following dates: Upper Lake – Tonight (Feb. 20), 5-6:30pm West Region Town Hall, 9470 Main Street, Habematolel Tribal Room Clearlake Oaks – Wednesday, March 6, 4 p.m.  East Region Town Hall, 12655 E. Highway 20 Lucerne – Wednesday, March 13, 6pm Lucerne Area Town Hall, 3985 Country Club Drive (10th and Country Club) Please join us and we can all work together in creating a pristine environment in all of Lake County!
20 Feb 19
WPIX 11 New York

NEW YORK — New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio says he was happy to be a “citizen patrol” when he directed his police detail to pull over a texting driver. The Democratic mayor says the traffic stop occurred Saturday while he was heading to a legislative event in Albany. The New York Post reports de Blasio […]

20 Feb 19
Russia News Now

The author is a prominent American social critic, blogger, and podcaster, and one of our all-time favorite pessimists. We carry his articles regularly on RI. His writing on Russia-gate has been highly entertaining. He is one of the better-known thinkers The New Yorker has dubbed ‘The Dystopians’ in an excellent 2009 profile, along with the brilliant Dmitry Orlov, another regular contributor to RI (archive). […]

20 Feb 19
Calgary Herald

Convoy achieves nothing but contributes to emissions Re: Road rage rolls out of the West; Truck Convoy Heading To Nation’s Capital To Send A Pro-Energy Message, Opinion, Feb. 16 This mass truck caravan arriving in Ottawa was a waste of time and money. I know the truckers are protesting the carbon tax but at the […]

20 Feb 19
CowboyPoetry.com

“Reading the News,” by Erwin E. Smith, c. 1908 from The Library of Congress We receive and come across all sorts of interesting information from a wide range of sources. Below, we gather some quick links to news stories, web features, and other items of interest gathered from the web, social media, and from you, […]

20 Feb 19
thetempohouse

Travelling Gallery launches its Spring tour, Displaced, an exhibition exploring artists’ responses to global migration and the refugee crisis Displaced tours from 6th March – 30th June 2019, various locations across Scotland Travelling Gallery today announced its Spring 2019 exhibition, Displaced, which tours from 6th March to 30th June 2019 across Scotland. The cross-artform exhibition will show work for the […]

20 Feb 19
Davis Enterprise

It thrills me more than I can say that the city of Davis dipped its line into the swift-flowing SACOG River the other day and pulled out a fish worth $8.1 million. I read all about in Anne Ternus-Bellamy’s story in The Davis Enterprise that begins: “The city of Davis and its community partners will […]

20 Feb 19
East Bay Times
Q:  I read all your Roadshow columns and am prompted to write a response to transit problems in the Bay Area. Public transportation is not practical and impossible during non-commute hours. Like finding a parking space at BART during the day. Impossible! Take public transit to BART: Yes if you have all day and can walk miles. Transit riders are treated like non-citizens. The silent minority gets the shaft again over and over. Marty Chew, Danville Like Mr. Roadshow’s Facebook page for more questions and answers about Bay Area roads, freeways and commuting. A: The issue was getting more transit from neighborhood to neighborhood after Clay Kallams discovered that a bus ride from his home in Walnut Creek to meet his wife for dinner in San Ramon would stop 29 times and require a long walk. Q: I understand Mr. Kallam’s problem all too well. However, not being able to join his wife for a dinner is far different from having to do things like grocery shopping, haircuts, medical appointments, etc. I am a 72-year-old widow who has never been able to drive. I regularly walk 2-4 miles to do most of these things and more. Even though I have become a maven of the transportation system in the County Connection district, there are many things I would like to do that I simply have to accept are not in the cards. I certainly don’t expect hundreds of billions of dollars to be spent to make my life easier. Nancy Morris, Walnut Creek A: And … Q: We don’t need high-frequency transit service to every Bay Area neighborhood. We just need effective transit. I don’t need a bus down the street from me every 15 minutes. But the last time I tried to plan a route from home to work, an 11-mile commute, I was looking at three transfers and a 2½ hour ride in each direction. S.S. A: Ouch. This is an issue facing many transit agencies. Do they try and provide decent coverage for all or cut expenses and rerouting lines to areas where most riders live? The Valley Transportation Authority will likely scale back service from 30 percent to 10 percent of Santa Clara County and re-route bus lines through downtown San Jose, so stay tuned. Q: Concentrate service in the highest demand locations? There lies the problem. Is there transit service to the San Jose airport? No. Is there legitimate grade-separated transit service to Santana Row//Valley Fair, Oakridge mall, Westgate mall, Eastridge mall, the Great Mall, Raging Waters, Stanford, Apple, Levi’s Stadium/Great America, Google, Facebook, etc? [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]No there isn’t. No wonder transit in the Bay Area is broken. M.B. A: Whoa. There is light rail to Levi’s Stadium, the Great Mall and Eastridge and grade separated crossings are coming to Caltrain. Join  Gary Richards for an hourlong chat noon Wednesday at www.mercurynews.com/live-chats. Look for Gary at Facebook.com/mr.roadshow or contact him at mrroadshow@bayareanewsgroup.com.
20 Feb 19
The Mercury News
Q:  I read all your Roadshow columns and am prompted to write a response to transit problems in the Bay Area. Public transportation is not practical and impossible during non-commute hours. Like finding a parking space at BART during the day. Impossible! Take public transit to BART: Yes if you have all day and can walk miles. Transit riders are treated like non-citizens. The silent minority gets the shaft again over and over. Marty Chew, Danville Like Mr. Roadshow’s Facebook page for more questions and answers about Bay Area roads, freeways and commuting. A: The issue was getting more transit from neighborhood to neighborhood after Clay Kallams discovered that a bus ride from his home in Walnut Creek to meet his wife for dinner in San Ramon would stop 29 times and require a long walk. Q: I understand Mr. Kallam’s problem all too well. However, not being able to join his wife for a dinner is far different from having to do things like grocery shopping, haircuts, medical appointments, etc. I am a 72-year-old widow who has never been able to drive. I regularly walk 2-4 miles to do most of these things and more. Even though I have become a maven of the transportation system in the County Connection district, there are many things I would like to do that I simply have to accept are not in the cards. I certainly don’t expect hundreds of billions of dollars to be spent to make my life easier. Nancy Morris, Walnut Creek A: And … Q: We don’t need high-frequency transit service to every Bay Area neighborhood. We just need effective transit. I don’t need a bus down the street from me every 15 minutes. But the last time I tried to plan a route from home to work, an 11-mile commute, I was looking at three transfers and a 2½ hour ride in each direction. S.S. A: Ouch. This is an issue facing many transit agencies. Do they try and provide decent coverage for all or cut expenses and rerouting lines to areas where most riders live? The Valley Transportation Authority will likely scale back service from 30 percent to 10 percent of Santa Clara County and re-route bus lines through downtown San Jose, so stay tuned. Q: Concentrate service in the highest demand locations? There lies the problem. Is there transit service to the San Jose airport? No. Is there legitimate grade-separated transit service to Santana Row//Valley Fair, Oakridge mall, Westgate mall, Eastridge mall, the Great Mall, Raging Waters, Stanford, Apple, Levi’s Stadium/Great America, Google, Facebook, etc? [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]No there isn’t. No wonder transit in the Bay Area is broken. M.B. A: Whoa. There is light rail to Levi’s Stadium, the Great Mall and Eastridge and grade separated crossings are coming to Caltrain. Join  Gary Richards for an hourlong chat noon Wednesday at www.mercurynews.com/live-chats. Look for Gary at Facebook.com/mr.roadshow or contact him at mrroadshow@bayareanewsgroup.com.
20 Feb 19
Dinosaur Zealot

I’ve been working at a construction site in New Rochelle, New York on and off for the past couple of weeks. I don’t know if you’ve ever driven into New Rochelle, but it’s terrible. In general I find 95 South from New Haven (and, to a lesser extent, 95 North to New Haven) to be […]