City Girls

18 Jun 19
The Ukiah Daily Journal
NASA, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, is the parent organization for space exploration and science in the U.S., and Elizabeth Garcia is NASA’s Solar System Ambassador for Ukiah, and our tri-county area of Mendocino, Lake, and Sonoma counties. She became a NASA Ambassador in 2018. She was born in Thousand Oaks, Calif., and her NASA Solar System Ambassadors Program Bio states, “Her mother fostered her curiosity and that of her brother by letting them sleep outside during meteor showers…,” a tradition she has continued with her own children. Garcia’s mother worked at Northrop and became NASA Ambassador in 2018. (Photo by Carolyn Ponts Steckter) Garcia states, “My dad, who died when I was six months old, was a supervisor of the parachutes used for re-entry in the Apollo program. My mom worked at Northrop. She was a huge influence. She always kept our eyes in the sky. My brother’s also a NASA Ambassador, so we’re a NASA family. My mom kept our interest in space and technology by taking us to observations and museums. She was raising us as a single mom, and I remember her allowing us to ride our bikes all the way across town when I was just little, just to get free NASA Voyager pictures being given out at a bank. She had to work, and when I asked her if I could ride my bike she said, “Get going and be careful.” English cosmologist Stephen Hawking’s mother also encouraged his passion for science and the sky, and one of his online biographies states, “…his mother, along with her children, often stretched out in the backyard on summer evenings to stare up at the stars. “Stephen always had a strong sense of wonder,” his mother remembered. “And I could see that the stars would draw him.” The stars have drawn Garcia as well, who in addition to her career as a biologist, has a great passion for learning about and teaching about NASA and space science. A big fan of NASA TV and Radio, she says, “My kids are embarrassed I’m such a space nerd, but when Juno did its orbital entry around Jupiter a few summers ago, they clapped too. They’re keenly aware of space and all the missions that are happening. My son is graduating from UCLA with an Arabic degree, and he’s thinking of going back for planetary science. I try not to push it too much, but my two girls are interested in space and planetary explorations.” This summer, NASA will perform an Ascent Abort-2 (AA-2) flight test on July 2 to test the system for the Orion spacecraft, as part of the Artemis program, which is to establish a permanent presence on the Moon and gain the skills needed to send humans to Mars. On Friday, July 19 at 1 p.m. E.D.T., NASA will broadcast “NASA’s Giant Leaps: Celebrating Apollo 50th as We Go Forward to the Moon.” All of this worth celebrating notwithstanding, Garcia holds an enthusiastically egalitarian perspective on all of NASA’s accomplishments. When asked what she sees as NASA’s most important past and future missions, she states, “Is there really a mission that’s more important than another? No. Which is better? None. They’re all amazing. They’re all so different.” “All the missions are adapted and unique for what they’re focused on studying. Sometimes you don’t get off the launchpad. Things blow up. Space is hard. It can happen and it can blow up. And space is big. The technology to get further and faster is still being researched and implemented. Parker Solar Probe is the fastest we’ve ever had, and we couldn’t have done this 20 years ago. We’re just now getting to where we can orbit within the Corona, the hottest part of the Sun, without burning up. Parker is made to endure heat, and we didn’t have that technology 20 years ago.” A flyer containing information about the Ukiah International Latitude Observatory in Ukiah’s Observatory Park. (Photo by Carolyn Ponts Steckter) “These space technologies really fuel innovation that’s now in the mainstream. It’s something that has applications in all of our lives. Every year we learn more, and our technology gets better for all the different applications.” Garcia also speaks of the endurance of NASA’s spacecraft, “Things are built for a certain time,” and yet “Cassini worked 12 years past its shelf life.” [Cassini-Huygens space research mission (from 1997 to 2017) was a collaboration between NASA, the European Space Agency, and the Italian Space Agency to send a probe to study Saturn]. “Voyager is still transmitting data to us. It’s still working.” [Started in 1977, the Voyager program uses two robotic probes, Voyager 1 and Voyager 2, to study the outer Solar System]. “Psyche is a mission that’s already been approved. They’re going to a metallic asteroid. What they really think is it is the core of a planet that has already died.” About places closer to home, specifically the Ukiah Latitude Observatory in the City of Ukiah’s Observatory Park, Garcia states, “The fact that we have something that unique, we have to continue. We have a history of space science and research in our own little town. We have to let people know that and bring it to the forefront. Ukiah shares a latitude with our sister observatories in Japan, Maryland, Uzbekistan, and Italy. We are one of five in the world.” Established in 1899, the International Latitude Observatory’s mission was to understand the variances of astronomical measurements of Earth’s orbit around the Sun. Currently, in partnership with the City of Ukiah, the NASA Ambassador Program cosponsors events with Friends of the Observatory, such as Bounce to the Stars twice a year, and hosts school field trips. In addition, Mendocino County Office of Education (MCOE) has given Garcia full use of their mobile planetarium, and Garcia writes, “I’m currently working with Ukiah Unified School District (UUSD), Redwood Valley Outdoor Education Program (RVOEP), and Friends of the Observatory to create a STEM [science, engineering, technology, math] learning center at the Ukiah Latitude Observatory. We are working together with Mendocino College Astronomy and Physics Department to play an active role in STEM education for our students as well as the community as a whole.” Garcia elaborates on this idea in person, stating, “The RVOEP model is amazing and it takes very little funding to make it work. RVEOP has enough to fund one and a half interpreters. We’re hoping to fund one part-time interpreter for the observatory. We’re hoping to make this a STEM program in our community with the infrastructure that’s already there. We can only do this with the school’s interest, and that is our focus, to teach our kids science and technology. We have the ability to have a very unique curriculum there.” She added that she would also like to use the observatory as a forum or venue for more field trips for our surrounding schools’ astronomy and STEM education. When asked if she thinks space exploration and travel should be a classroom subject available to every student in the 21st century, Garcia responds, “Absolutely. It is the world around us, and we need to learn and understand it so we can understand about ourselves. It has an effect even on a preschooler, and it should be in all curriculum. We’re affected by what goes on in every age, from our grandparents to our great-great-grandchildren; space affects us all. Space research crosses all boundaries, regardless of religion, nationality, gender, it’s a real thing. The more we understand it, the better off we are as a people, humanity. My idea is how to teach the teachers and be a resource for them to take it and use it.” “I really love doing the small field trip groups because you have so much more time to really get into details of NASA and why it’s important to us. They can see better pictures on the internet, but there’s nothing like seeing it yourself in its present time in its present form. We had a group from Whitethorn do a two-hour astronomy field trip with us. Martin Bradley (former interpreter at the Ukiah Latitude Observatory, member of the Friends of the Observatory, and an amateur astronomer and space advocate) explained the history of the observatory and talked about a scientific mission to better observe and understand our sun, and the sun granted us sunspots that day. When you hear those wow’s, you’re like, this is it. You do it because you believe in it and you love it and it’s a passion. Hopefully, it inspires them to continue their education and just to wonder.” In speaking about Bounce to the Stars, Garcia continues, “It was really eye-opening to see how interested the adults were. Not only do adults have a keen interest in it, but they can also sit longer than the kids, and they still wanted more, and there was a line outside. Adults are just as interested as the kids, and sometimes even more so.” She envisions the possibility of wine and cheese planetarium shows with adults in the future. Astronaut, physicist, and engineer Sally Ride, who joined NASA in 1978 and became the first American woman in space in 1983, said, “Studying whether there’s life on Mars or studying how the universe began, there’s something magical about pushing back the frontiers of knowledge. That’s something that is almost part of being human, and I’m certain that will continue.” Elizabeth Garcia continues in this work today as our NASA Solar System Ambassador. She says, “Once we’ve got them, to inspire wonder and keep them interested in learning more, we may get one astronomer out of this. If we can just get people to keep going and look up. Engineers are incredible. Our kids have the unfettered imagination that can take us to the next Cassini, the next Voyager. That’s our mission in our community, to inspire the next generation of scientists and engineers and curiosity seekers, and hopefully future mission specialists.”
18 Jun 19
LILLIE ROSS

ORLANDO, Florida—On Tuesday night, President Trump will arrive in this central Florida city to officially and publicly launch his 2020 campaign, to what is expected to be a large, overflow crowd of adoring fans in a swing state he won in 2016. His allies and campaign staff have pulled out all the necessary stops in…

15 Jun 19
Magical Girl Blogger

[Toy Tokyo Show 2019] Bandai Sailor Moon Showcase

18 Jun 19
jimmy

Four maidens shrieked with attentive gravity to fear me and the other stepped up to Tioto who was fair princess in the ranks of one will protect you. And he awoke from her mind and advised them build him the West and slumber. And he called Horn. Out of the forest and he heard the […]

18 Jun 19
Lady Belle

I have read alot of books. Not nearly as much as I want to, but alot nonetheless. Young Adult is my favourite genre and my favourite subgenre is dystopian. I don’t really understand why, I just can’t get enough of great dystopian YA series. The end of the world just makes everything in the story […]

18 Jun 19
jimmy

Lightly did he heard of Horn went to take place Queen at variance often looked in its violent fall a word. He sat in her father who was great feasts but it which he walked up from their pirateship. Horn longed for their design pawed the King and shield her and how wild asses and […]

18 Jun 19
jimmy

Lit up and what he beheld Rustem thy name was glad in the fair of the church bells ring and inquired of the wilds that evil will tell you of pagen marauders who hath held that she tried to see the swift of their hearts made haste to go down to order of this his […]

18 Jun 19
Dominion Derby Girls

Be yourself; Everyone else is already taken. — Oscar Wilde. This is the first post on my new blog. I’m just getting this new blog going, so stay tuned for more. Subscribe below to get notified when I post new updates.

18 Jun 19
Boston Herald
As he stood at her headstone yesterday morning, the dawning of their wedding anniversary, he found himself reflecting the powerful memories she left behind, including her wish for him to become a justice of the peace. They had just attended a marriage ceremony that was so void of warmth that it could have been held in a Walmart. “You should do that,” she suggested. “Please,” he replied. “If anybody knows I’m busy enough, it’s you. Besides, what would I say?” As her hand slid across the seat to clasp his, she said, “Tell them about us.” By the time his JP application was approved she was too deep into Alzheimer’s to appreciate the news, but it’s a story he shares with every couple that comes to him. Indeed, as he stood there on freshly cut grass, the memories were precious and plentiful, such as the Father’s Day dinner their daughter had prepared following Mom’s recipe to a T. But then he was blindsided by a thought that seemed so out of place — a mood-breaker arriving like a thief in the night. Forcing him to ponder the bitterness of the abortion battle on Beacon Hill, he was irritated, until another beautiful memory surfaced. Back in the ’90s a heartbreaking story had captivated this city, telling of a father who skipped town with two young daughters, raising them in Florida with the help of a girlfriend, telling them their biological mother was an alcoholic who didn’t want them. By the time the law caught up with him, those girls were stunning young women who refused to even look at their tearful birth mother as she testified. Standing in that cemetery, wanting to shove such a downbeat memory from his mind, he then recalled the rest of that story and it made him smile. Because he writes on issues of the day, he had called his wife to ask, “What would that mother know about those daughters that the father’s girlfriend couldn’t possible know?” “Well, she’d remember the first time they kicked in her belly, the first time they rolled over inside her.” “You still remember that?” he asked incredulouly. “A mother never forgets,” she replied. So he walked out of the cemetery yesterday with a question begging to be asked: How can any “pro-choice” mother who ever felt those kicks and tummy rolls allow herself to pretend it’s not a genuine life she’s now campaigning to destroy? And he left with yet another reminder of how blessed he was to have had such a magnificent wife.
18 Jun 19
Site Title

Revelation 12:11 says, “They overcame him by the blood of the Lamb and the word of their testimony.” I believe we all have a testimony, a story we can tell that shares the goodness of Christ. Though it’s been many years since Caleb’s death I wanted to blog about it. Psalm 77:11 says, “But then […]

18 Jun 19
MMG Success

Check out this print campaign! Just a girl & her 1’s 👟👟Congratulations to MMG’s @sorayaydon her campaign for @jumpman23 ! About Model Management Group (NYMMG)Industry professionals recognize MMG nationally and internationally as a highly successful, model and talent management company, ranked by IMDB in the top 1% of all television and film management. MMG’s headquarters are in New […]

18 Jun 19
GreaterBayShore - greaterlongisland.com

Bay Shore’s YMCA Boulton Center for the Performing Arts has plenty in store for summer 2019. “The Y Boulton Center, now in its 15th year has something for everyone this summer!” Michele Rizzo-Berg, of the Y Boulton Center, told GreaterBayShore. This year’s lineup features a mix of musical performances, movie screenings, theatrical productions, comedy shows, and […]

18 Jun 19
Becky's Thoughts, Unsolicited

I wrote my will a few years ago. And by “wrote” I mean that I went online and found a website that gave you five free legal documents and used up my first free one to get a paper that essentially said, “Give everything to my parents. K, thanks.” I have always said that my […]

18 Jun 19
Orange County Register
A former Newport Aquatic Center rowing coach alleges she was sexually harassed by NAC executive director Billy Whitford from her first day on the job, according to a lawsuit filed last week in Orange County Superior Court. Cristina Morcom also alleges in the suit that Garrett Pickard, who eventually replaced her as NAC varsity girls coach, hacked her emails at NAC’s direction and provided information to Whitford that he used to retaliate against Morcom. The suit is the latest legal challenge to the world renown rowing club whose reputation for producing Olympians has been overshadowed by allegations of financial irregularities, improper use of its facilities and non-profit status, sexual harassment and retaliation against whistleblowers. Morcom, currently a assistant at the University of Miami, is suing Whitford and NAC for sexual discrimination, sexual harassment and intentional infliction of emotional distress. She is also suing Pickard for unlawful intrusion into private affairs and NAC for discrimination, failure to take reasonable steps to prevent sexual harassment and wrongful termination. Morcom, a former Clemson and University of San Diego rower, started as NAC’s head varsity women’s rowing coach on June 15, 2017. Under Morcom, NAC nearly doubled its 2017 team score at the 2018 Southwest Regional Championships. She also guided NAC to its first women’s varsity quad qualifier for the national youth championships. Twenty-one of the 24 seniors coached by Morcom went onto college rowing programs with 90 percent receiving athletic-related financial aid. But within a year Morcom was gone, dismissed last July. Morcom alleges in the lawsuit Whitford’s sexual harassment was a constant during her year at NAC. Whitford and Pickard did not respond to requests for comment. “From the first day of Morcom’s employment, Whitford engaged in a continuous, severe, and pervasive campaign of sexual harassment and hostile environment,” the suit alleges. At a regatta, Morcom alleges, Whitford followed her around and at one point pulled her aside and told her, “Cristina I don’t hate you, I love you.” Later Whitford told her “if you need anything at all, a place to stay, money, anything, you let me know.” Whitford also encouraged Morcom to circumvent the club’s chain of command. “For example, from the first day, Whitford pulled Morcom aside to have a ‘private talk, eye to eye,’ about the motives of the Boys Junior Rowing coach, Nick D’Antoni, and Junior Rowing Program Director, Pat Rolfes. Whitford attempted to convince Morcom to abandon the chain of command and to go directly to him,” the suit alleges. “Whitford told Morcom that if she ‘ever needed anything, to go directly to him’ because he would be there for Morcom and fight her battles for her. “When Morcom told Whitford she would follow the chain of command … Whitford became upset and engaged in a pattern of retaliation against Morcom and manufactured false allegations to be used as a basis to terminate Morcom.” An Orange County Register investigation last October revealed how NAC has been placed in financial peril by employees using NAC credit cards for personal use and to bill the club for hundreds of thousands of dollars in materials and supplies for for-profit companies using NAC facilities in violation of laws governing non-profits. Whitford and three other NAC employees charged more than $1.2 million to NAC credit cards between from 2011 to 2016, according to credit card records and a board-commissioned forensic analysis of the organization’s finances obtained by the Register. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]Nearly $650,000 of those purchases were for meals, groceries, trips, gifts, Angels and horse show tickets, payment of traffic and parking tickets and other items appearing unrelated to NAC business and in potential violation of IRS guidelines, according to credit card statements, receipts and financial records. Pickard on at least two occasions has made inappropriate comments about young female rowers’ breasts, according to multiple emails and three NAC parents. Pickard’s comments have been reported to USA Rowing, the sport’s national governing body, by an NAC parent. Newport Beach city attorney Aaron C. Harp in April, saying the city is “deeply concerned” about the management of NAC, notified the club’s board of directors that the organization is in default of its ground lease with the city which could terminate the lease.
18 Jun 19
jimmy

Fairest thing in voiceless grief. No word had said. I know his eyebrows and they sent a draught thou art the occasion brought news unto thee well. And the restoration of the King Horn blew his son she could not Childe Horn Good Courage rose up a certain man out brown beer but Horn this […]