Cnn Poll

18 Jun 19
SenzaNubi

Giuseppe Sandro Mela. 2019-06-19. Alle elezioni presidenziali del 2016 Mr Trump seppe conquistarsi 304 grandi elettori contro i 227 di Mrs Hillary Clinton. Fu una vittoria strepitosa, anche se ragionando in termini percentuali lui aveva ottenuto il 46.1% dei suffragi contro il 48.2% della sua avversaria. Sembrerebbe quasi che nessuno sappia come negli Stati Uniti […]

18 Jun 19
Nachrichten Welt

Felicia Sonmez Nationaler Reporter über das aktuelle politische Nachrichtenteam der Washington Post 18. Juni um 17:59 Uhr ORLANDO – Präsident Trump wird seine Wiederwahlkampagne hier am Dienstagabend bei einer von ihm versprochenen Veranstaltung ankündigen – doch Stunden vor der Kundgebung drohte strömender Regen die Aufregung darüber zu dämpfen, was Trumps Kampagne für eine Versammlung von […]

18 Jun 19
WTVR.com

The general election isn’t for another year and a half, but Biden has the highest lead over the President of tested Democratic candidates.

18 Jun 19
WSVN 7News | Miami News, Weather, Sports | Fort Lauderdale

(CNN) — As President Donald Trump heads to Florida on Tuesday to officially declare his reelection bid in 2020, he’s trailing multiple top Democratic candidates in the battleground Sunshine State, according to a new Quinnipiac poll. Former Vice President Joe Biden bests Trump in a hypothetical matchup for the general election, by 50% to 41%. This […]

18 Jun 19
WANE
Click here at 8 pm to watch the Trump re-election rally WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump captured the Republican Party and then the presidency in 2016 as an insurgent intent on disrupting the status quo. As he mounts his bid for reelection, Trump is offering himself as the outsider once again — but it’s a much more awkward pitch to make from inside the Oval Office. Trump is set to formally announce his 2020 bid on Tuesday at a rally in Orlando, Florida, where advisers said he aims to connect the dots between the promise of his disruptive first-time candidacy and his goals for another term in the White House. His promises to rock the ship of state are now more than an abstract pledge, though, complicated by his tumultuous 29 months at its helm. Any president is inherently an insider. Trump has worked in the Oval Office for two years, travels the skies in Air Force One and changes the course of history with the stroke of a pen or the post of a tweet. “We’re taking on the failed political establishment and restoring government of, by and for the people,” Trump said in a video released by his campaign Monday to mark his relaunch. “It’s the people, you’re the people, you won the election.” That populist clarion was a central theme of his maiden political adventure, as the businessman-turned-candidate successfully appealed to disaffected voters who felt left behind by economic dislocation and demographic shifts. And he has no intention of abandoning it, even if he is the face of the institutions he looks to disrupt. Anna Connelly, left, and Jeanna Gullett supporters of President Donald Trump, make camp Monday, June 17, 2019, in Orlando, Fla. as they wait to attend a rally for the president on Tuesday evening. (AP Photo/John Raoux) He underscored that on the eve of the Orlando rally, returning to the hardline immigration themes of his first campaign by tweeting that “Next week ICE will begin the process of removing the millions of illegal aliens who have illicitly found their way into the United States.” That promise, which came with no details and sparked Democratic condemnation, seemed to offer a peek into a campaign that will largely be fought along the same lines as his first bid, with very few new policy proposals for a second term. Those involved in the president’s reelection effort believe that his brash version of populism, combined with his mantra to “Drain the Swamp,” still resonates, despite his administration’s cozy ties with lobbyists and corporations and the Trump family’s apparent efforts to profit off the presidency. “He’s still not viewed as a politician,” said Jason Miller, Trump’s 2016 senior communications adviser. “Voters don’t define him by the party label, they define him by his policies and his message of shaking up the status quo in Washington. That’s the biggest reason he was able to win blue states in 2016.” Democrats, though, predict Trump won’t be able to get away with the outsider branding. “How can you say: Forget about the last two years, he is an outsider, he is bashing down doors,” said Karine Jean-Pierre, a former senior Obama campaign official now at MoveOn.org. “People’s lives are harder because of what he has done as president. Voters are paying their attention and are not going to buy it.” Republicans working with the Trump campaign but not authorized to speak publicly about internal conversations said campaign advisers believe that Trump is still perceived as a businessman and point to his clashes with the Washington establishment — including Congress, the so-called Deep State and members of his own party — as proof that he is still an outsider rather than a creature of the Beltway. Helping further that image, Trump advisers believe, is that his main Democratic foils are all career politicians: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, former Vice President Joe Biden and, yes, Hillary Clinton. “He promised that he’d go to Washington and shake things up, and he certainly has,” said Trump campaign manager Tim Murtaugh. Still, it’s not as though Trump is running from Washington. If anything, he’s wrapping himself in the trappings and authorities of his office. Last week, Trump granted behind-the-scenes access to his limousine, Marine One helicopter and Air Force One for an hourlong ABC News special meant to highlight the singular advantage he has over his rivals — that he already has the job they want. And Trump is eager to use the power of the office to further his case for reelection. Last month in Louisiana, he promised voters a new bridge if he wins, and in the pivotal Florida Panhandle, he pledged new disaster relief money would flow in a second Trump term. Trump advisers also point to his popularity among white working-class voters, who consider themselves “forgotten Americans” left behind and mocked by elite insiders. For those voters, many of whom in 2016 cast their first ballots in decades, Trump remains the embodiment of their outsider grievances, their anger stoked by his clashes with political foes and the rest of government (even when his party controls it). Advisers believe that, in an age of extreme polarization, many Trump backers view their support for the president as part of their identity, one not easily shaken. They point to his seemingly unmovable support with his base supporters as evidence that, despite more than two years in office, he is still viewed the same way he was as a candidate: the bomb-throwing political rebel. Americans acknowledge Trump is a change agent, but they are divided in their views of that change. Early this year, a CNN poll found about three-quarters of Americans saying Trump has created significant changes in the country, and they split about evenly between calling it change for the better and change for the worse. More recently, a March poll from CNN showed 42% of Americans think Trump can bring the kind of change the country needs. Some rally-goers began to line up a full day in advance for the Orlando kickoff, which the campaign aggressively promoted on social media and tried to give a festival feel with live music and food. But while the event is being billed as beginning of the president’s campaign, Trump filed the paperwork officially announcing his bid within hours of his inauguration on Jan. 20, 2017. Lemire reported from New York. Associated Press writer Hannah Fingerhut contributed to this report. Follow Lemire on Twitter at http://twitter.com/@JonLemire and Miller at http://twitter.com/@zekejmiller Copyright 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
18 Jun 19
93.1 WZAK

It is not known who exactly is being let go, and if they have already lost their jobs.   (CNN) – The Trump campaign said it will fire several of its pollsters — after the leak of unflattering internal poll numbers, according to two campaign officials. The numbers show Mr. Trump lagging behind Democratic presidential […]

18 Jun 19
WPRI.com
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump captured the Republican Party and then the presidency in 2016 as an insurgent intent on disrupting the status quo. As he mounts his bid for reelection, Trump is offering himself as the outsider once again — but it’s a much more awkward pitch to make from inside the Oval Office. Trump is set to formally announce his 2020 bid on Tuesday at a rally in Orlando, Florida, where advisers said he aims to connect the dots between the promise of his disruptive first-time candidacy and his goals for another term in the White House. His promises to rock the ship of state are now more than an abstract pledge, though, complicated by his tumultuous 29 months at its helm. Any president is inherently an insider. Trump has worked in the Oval Office for two years, travels the skies in Air Force One and changes the course of history with the stroke of a pen or the post of a tweet. “We’re taking on the failed political establishment and restoring government of, by and for the people,” Trump said in a video released by his campaign Monday to mark his relaunch. “It’s the people, you’re the people, you won the election.” That populist clarion was a central theme of his maiden political adventure, as the businessman-turned-candidate successfully appealed to disaffected voters who felt left behind by economic dislocation and demographic shifts. And he has no intention of abandoning it, even if he is the face of the institutions he looks to disrupt. He underscored that on the eve of the Orlando rally, returning to the hardline immigration themes of his first campaign by tweeting that “Next week ICE will begin the process of removing the millions of illegal aliens who have illicitly found their way into the United States.” That promise, which came with no details and sparked Democratic condemnation, seemed to offer a peek into a campaign that will largely be fought along the same lines as his first bid, with very few new policy proposals for a second term. Those involved in the president’s reelection effort believe that his brash version of populism, combined with his mantra to “Drain the Swamp,” still resonates, despite his administration’s cozy ties with lobbyists and corporations and the Trump family’s apparent efforts to profit off the presidency. “He’s still not viewed as a politician,” said Jason Miller, Trump’s 2016 senior communications adviser. “Voters don’t define him by the party label, they define him by his policies and his message of shaking up the status quo in Washington. That’s the biggest reason he was able to win blue states in 2016.” Democrats, though, predict Trump won’t be able to get away with the outsider branding. “How can you say: Forget about the last two years, he is an outsider, he is bashing down doors,” said Karine Jean-Pierre, a former senior Obama campaign official now at MoveOn.org. “People’s lives are harder because of what he has done as president. Voters are paying their attention and are not going to buy it.” Republicans working with the Trump campaign but not authorized to speak publicly about internal conversations said campaign advisers believe that Trump is still perceived as a businessman and point to his clashes with the Washington establishment — including Congress, the so-called Deep State and members of his own party — as proof that he is still an outsider rather than a creature of the Beltway. Helping further that image, Trump advisers believe, is that his main Democratic foils are all career politicians: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, former Vice President Joe Biden and, yes, Hillary Clinton. “He promised that he’d go to Washington and shake things up, and he certainly has,” said Trump campaign manager Tim Murtaugh. Still, it’s not as though Trump is running from Washington. If anything, he’s wrapping himself in the trappings and authorities of his office. Last week, Trump granted behind-the-scenes access to his limousine, Marine One helicopter and Air Force One for an hourlong ABC News special meant to highlight the singular advantage he has over his rivals — that he already has the job they want. And Trump is eager to use the power of the office to further his case for reelection. Last month in Louisiana, he promised voters a new bridge if he wins, and in the pivotal Florida Panhandle, he pledged new disaster relief money would flow in a second Trump term. Trump advisers also point to his popularity among white working-class voters, who consider themselves “forgotten Americans” left behind and mocked by elite insiders. For those voters, many of whom in 2016 cast their first ballots in decades, Trump remains the embodiment of their outsider grievances, their anger stoked by his clashes with political foes and the rest of government (even when his party controls it). Advisers believe that, in an age of extreme polarization, many Trump backers view their support for the president as part of their identity, one not easily shaken. They point to his seemingly unmovable support with his base supporters as evidence that, despite more than two years in office, he is still viewed the same way he was as a candidate: the bomb-throwing political rebel. Americans acknowledge Trump is a change agent, but they are divided in their views of that change. Early this year, a CNN poll found about three-quarters of Americans saying Trump has created significant changes in the country, and they split about evenly between calling it change for the better and change for the worse. More recently, a March poll from CNN showed 42% of Americans think Trump can bring the kind of change the country needs. Some rally-goers began to line up a full day in advance for the Orlando kickoff, which the campaign aggressively promoted on social media and tried to give a festival feel with live music and food. But while the event is being billed as beginning of the president’s campaign, Trump filed the paperwork officially announcing his bid within hours of his inauguration on Jan. 20, 2017. ___ Lemire reported from New York. Associated Press writer Hannah Fingerhut contributed to this report.
18 Jun 19
BCNN1 WP

President Donald Trump captured the Republican Party and then the presidency in 2016 as an insurgent intent on disrupting the status quo. As he mounts his bid for reelection, Trump is offering himself as the outsider once again — but it’s a much more awkward pitch to make from inside the Oval Office.

18 Jun 19
Live Feeds

New poll shows Biden and other top Democrats beating Trump in Florida  CNN

As President Donald Trump heads to Florida on Tuesday to officially declare his reelection bid in 2020, he’s trailing multiple top Democratic candidates in the …

View full coverage on Google News

18 Jun 19
IPO EMPIRE

Poll shows Medicare for All is confusing to most Americans  CNN Nearly 3/4 of Democrats don’t know what ‘Medicare for all’ is  Washington Examiner House Democrats’ internal feud over prescription drug prices, explained  Vox.com The Medicare-for-All trap | Moran  NJ.com A health insurer takes on his own industry: Describe clearly what we favor, rather than attack what we oppose […]

18 Jun 19
Fortune

Trump is set to formally announce his 2020 bid on Tuesday at a rally in Orlando, Florida.

18 Jun 19
CauseACTION Clarion

Not as risky as a member of Trump’s own party endorsing impeachment, but pretty risky. Katie Porter represents CA-45, a district that until last November had gone red in every House election since 1983. It’s in Orange County, traditionally a Republican stronghold. But Trump has changed that: All seven districts in California’s “orange curtain” turned […]

18 Jun 19
ParqView

Donald Trump is officially running for a second term in 2020. But he’s had his eye on the presidency for a long time. SOURCES AND FURTHER READING: The 78 wildest lines in Donald Trump’s epic ABC interview https://www.cnn.com/2019/06/17/politics/donald-trump-george-stephanopoulos-abc/index.html Trump launches immigration rant in bid to rekindle 2016 campaign rage https://www.cnn.com/2019/06/18/politics/donald-trump-election-2020-orlando-florida/index.html Four Years Ago Trump Was […]