Coca Cola

21 Jul 19
noxacp

Si sta parlando della forza degli USA e delle grandi aziende e si sta dimenticando che l’Italia ha incontrato la crisi mentre tentava di copiare gli USA. Inoltre, si sta dimenticando che ciò che ha portato al successo l’Italia e a clusterizzazione delle aziende, il “metodo” che ha reso il MADE IN ITALY il secondo […]

21 Jul 19
INDIAN NEWZ

Bengaluru, July 20, 2019: India’s leading diversity job portal Equiv.in launched “Q-rious”, the first-of-its-kind networking initiative that will bring together corporates and the LQBTQIA community to collaboratively evolve policies that can promote inclusiveness of the community at the workplace. The initiative was unveiled on Saturday in the city at the eighth edition of the Women […]

20 Jul 19
CUPCAKEcalifragilistic

Fifty years ago this weekend, my life went in a direction I did not, could not, see coming. I was across the state, in Pittsburgh, thrilled my oldest brother & my brand new, three months pregnant sister-in-law had asked ME to help them move back to the Philadelpia area. I was walking on air – […]

20 Jul 19
Everything Footie

Ronaldo Il fenomino is the best striker I have seen!!! Dare to Zlatan!!!

20 Jul 19
DSM (Defeating Stigma Mindfully)

Sometimes we have to go through the feeling of loneliness to come out as stronger individuals in the long run!

20 Jul 19
Urbavale Construtora e Imobiliária - Creci 2782-J

Online dating sites for Singles in Phoenix Meet Compatible Phoenix Singles that have Signed-up on eHarmony Phoenix is just a real wilderness utopia. Component city that is bustling part peaceful city, Phoenix is just a colorful mixture of Indian tradition, Spanish impact, and United states crazy western. Neighborhood dating in Phoenix can produce experiences because […]

20 Jul 19

–Lachman Balani It was the summer of ’69 and I was literally over the moon as I had just graduated from the American School of Tangier, a US secondary school in Tangier, Morocco and was preparing to go to Cornell University in the US for further studies in engineering. Amidst all the excitement of getting […]

20 Jul 19
cracked rear viewer

Kowabunga! The success of 1963’s BEACH PARTY begat a deluge of Teen Beach Flicks, loaded with sand, sun, and surf, not to mention babes in bikinis, sturdy, studly boys, and rock’n’roll music. And while the Frankie & Annette/AIP sequels have a charm of their own, most of the imitators ranged from fairly okay (IT’S A BIKINI […]

20 Jul 19
Oh Manchester, So Much To Answer For

Not just the pop top 40 from this week 40 years ago, but the country top 10, too, because just look at it. All but two of these are in the accompanying playlist. Hot 100:1 1 BAD GIRLS –•– Donna Summer (Casablanca)-9 (2 weeks at #1) (1) #1 pop, new #1 R&B, and #1 album. […]

20 Jul 19
Press Telegram
Who better to tell a rapt San Diego Comic-Con crowd how to follow people and evade surveillance than a pair of ex-CIA spooks come in from the cold. A pair of former spies with “The Agency” told a Comic-Con audience at the San Diego Convention Center how to “hypothetically” conduct and escape surveillance — for storytelling purposes in spy novels, scripts and comics. The Spy and Espionage Tech panel at Comic-Con featured espionage experts, detectives and former spies discussing espionage techniques of the past, present and future. “Everything I’m going to tell you is hypothetical,” former CIA agent Jason Hanson said to knowing laughter. “Remember that, hypothetical.” Hanson, who was with the CIA for 7 years, now runs the Utah-based Spy, Escape and Evasion, which teaches everyday people how to escape duct tape, pick locks, detect lies, crash cars and conduct surveillance. “We went to Hollywood. We were intrigued by their ability to build deceptions and illusions,” former CIA chief of disguise Jonna Mendez told the Comic-Con audience. “For God and country, they gave us some lessons.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] Mendez belonged to an office at the agency that was the equivalent of the Q Branch in the James Bond novels that created surveillance bugs, phony documents and camera pens. Mendez is the wife of former CIA officer Tony Mendez, the subject of the 2012 film “Argo.” Here are 6 CIA-tested espionage techniques you can use the next time you need to conduct or escape surveillance — hypothetically speaking, of course. 1. Twins and Triplets “We used Hollywood as a vehicle to teach us a little bit about teleportation,” Mendez said. “How to make twins. It’s what they do in the magic acts. We discovered we could make twins, too.” The CIA would create twins or triplets to throw off surveillance, Mendez said. “We could rig it where they weren’t sure if it was you, or you No. 2,” Mendez said. “Then the real you could step out of the picture.” 2. Secret Disguises “Disguise has become not just a great tool to have in your bag of tools, it has become a form of body armor around the world,” Mendez said. “It will protect you in a lot of situations.” “We could do anything with disguise that we put our minds to,” Mendez said. “We could do ethnic changes. We could make you Chinese, we could make you African, we could make you Indian. We could make you anything you needed.” “We could do gender changes,” Mendez said. “We could turn women into men and men into women.” 3. Mobile Sniffer Machines Tailing bad guys in a car is not as easy as it looks in the movies. The surveillance vehicle can’t just be two car lengths behind and avoid detection. “Maybe there would be an additive you could pour in a gas tank,” Hanson said. “You pour that additive into the gas tank and then it emits a certain smell.” A trailing vehicle with a sniffing machine can follow the exhaust of the suspect’s car without drawing attention. 4. Cell Phone Magic Wands Drug dealers and mafiosos use burner phones to hide their identity. “All you’ve got to do is have somebody get within 20 yards,” Hanson said. “The ‘magic wand,’ as we call it, will read all the electronic serial numbers on the cell phones.” With the cell phone serial numbers, spies can follow their targets undetected. Even if the bad guys are using burner phones. 5. Tag, Track and Locate What’s the best way to get a listening device into a home with the help of the person under surveillance? Follow their shopping habits. “If I know he goes to 7-Eleven and he loves Coke and he always buys a 6-pack every Friday, well all I’ve got to do is tag the many 6-packs of Coke in that 7-Eleven,” Hanson said. “I can put listening devices on multiples of them — remember, hypothetical. If he brings that 6-pack of Coke in his house, maybe I’m going to hear something.” Shampoo or laundry detergent might be a better Trojan Horse because they would stay in the house longer than Coca-Cola, which might be consumed faster. 6. Cell Phone Microphones and Cameras “There are multiple ways these days to track you,” Hanson said. “Most of us just have cell phones. We can turn on your microphones or we can turn on your cameras very easily — if you were the government and were allowed to do that stuff. It’s easier than ever these days to track people.” In addition to Hanson and Mendez, the Comic-Con panelists included cyber defense expert Josh Ray and genetic genealogist Barbara Rae-Venter. The panel was moderated by Dent the Future co-founder Steve Broback. READ MORE about SDCC 2019: Photo galleries: Cosplay | Scenes from Comic-Con | Her Universe Fashion Show | Preview night Recaps: Day 2 | Day 1 | 5 memorable moments from opening day |Preview night and the Running of the Nerds Only at Comic-Con: Tom Cruise lookalike at the “Top Gun” bar | Wheelchair cosplay | The dancing monster Fashion: Her Universe Fashion Show winners | SoCal Her Universe designers | Interview with Her Universe’s Ashley Eckstein | The Hero Within clothing line | What cosplay weapons are allowed | The 23 swag backpacks Inside SDCC: A daily guide to TV and movie panels | George Takei and “The Terror” | “Fear the Walking Dead” | Christian comic books | The $1.1 million comic book | Mensa members predict the future | The future of college esports | Super fans: Orlando Jones is Comic-Con’s No. 1 fan | “Steven Universe” | “Dragon Ball Z” world record | Wayward Cocktails “Supernatural” party Things to do: No badge needed for these activities | Comic-Con museum in Balboa Park | Where to drink and party History: The 12-year-old who co-founded Comic-Con | 50 facts about Comic-Con’s 50 years The big issues: Service animals are superheroes | Cosplay, panels reflect diversity | Security measures  
20 Jul 19
Whittier Daily News
Who better to tell a rapt San Diego Comic-Con crowd how to follow people and evade surveillance than a pair of ex-CIA spooks come in from the cold. A pair of former spies with “The Agency” told a Comic-Con audience at the San Diego Convention Center how to “hypothetically” conduct and escape surveillance — for storytelling purposes in spy novels, scripts and comics. The Spy and Espionage Tech panel at Comic-Con featured espionage experts, detectives and former spies discussing espionage techniques of the past, present and future. “Everything I’m going to tell you is hypothetical,” former CIA agent Jason Hanson said to knowing laughter. “Remember that, hypothetical.” Hanson, who was with the CIA for 7 years, now runs the Utah-based Spy, Escape and Evasion, which teaches everyday people how to escape duct tape, pick locks, detect lies, crash cars and conduct surveillance. “We went to Hollywood. We were intrigued by their ability to build deceptions and illusions,” former CIA chief of disguise Jonna Mendez told the Comic-Con audience. “For God and country, they gave us some lessons.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] Mendez belonged to an office at the agency that was the equivalent of the Q Branch in the James Bond novels that created surveillance bugs, phony documents and camera pens. Mendez is the wife of former CIA officer Tony Mendez, the subject of the 2012 film “Argo.” Here are 6 CIA-tested espionage techniques you can use the next time you need to conduct or escape surveillance — hypothetically speaking, of course. 1. Twins and Triplets “We used Hollywood as a vehicle to teach us a little bit about teleportation,” Mendez said. “How to make twins. It’s what they do in the magic acts. We discovered we could make twins, too.” The CIA would create twins or triplets to throw off surveillance, Mendez said. “We could rig it where they weren’t sure if it was you, or you No. 2,” Mendez said. “Then the real you could step out of the picture.” 2. Secret Disguises “Disguise has become not just a great tool to have in your bag of tools, it has become a form of body armor around the world,” Mendez said. “It will protect you in a lot of situations.” “We could do anything with disguise that we put our minds to,” Mendez said. “We could do ethnic changes. We could make you Chinese, we could make you African, we could make you Indian. We could make you anything you needed.” “We could do gender changes,” Mendez said. “We could turn women into men and men into women.” 3. Mobile Sniffer Machines Tailing bad guys in a car is not as easy as it looks in the movies. The surveillance vehicle can’t just be two car lengths behind and avoid detection. “Maybe there would be an additive you could pour in a gas tank,” Hanson said. “You pour that additive into the gas tank and then it emits a certain smell.” A trailing vehicle with a sniffing machine can follow the exhaust of the suspect’s car without drawing attention. 4. Cell Phone Magic Wands Drug dealers and mafiosos use burner phones to hide their identity. “All you’ve got to do is have somebody get within 20 yards,” Hanson said. “The ‘magic wand,’ as we call it, will read all the electronic serial numbers on the cell phones.” With the cell phone serial numbers, spies can follow their targets undetected. Even if the bad guys are using burner phones. 5. Tag, Track and Locate What’s the best way to get a listening device into a home with the help of the person under surveillance? Follow their shopping habits. “If I know he goes to 7-Eleven and he loves Coke and he always buys a 6-pack every Friday, well all I’ve got to do is tag the many 6-packs of Coke in that 7-Eleven,” Hanson said. “I can put listening devices on multiples of them — remember, hypothetical. If he brings that 6-pack of Coke in his house, maybe I’m going to hear something.” Shampoo or laundry detergent might be a better Trojan Horse because they would stay in the house longer than Coca-Cola, which might be consumed faster. 6. Cell Phone Microphones and Cameras “There are multiple ways these days to track you,” Hanson said. “Most of us just have cell phones. We can turn on your microphones or we can turn on your cameras very easily — if you were the government and were allowed to do that stuff. It’s easier than ever these days to track people.” In addition to Hanson and Mendez, the Comic-Con panelists included cyber defense expert Josh Ray and genetic genealogist Barbara Rae-Venter. The panel was moderated by Dent the Future co-founder Steve Broback. READ MORE about SDCC 2019: Photo galleries: Cosplay | Scenes from Comic-Con | Her Universe Fashion Show | Preview night Recaps: Day 2 | Day 1 | 5 memorable moments from opening day |Preview night and the Running of the Nerds Only at Comic-Con: Tom Cruise lookalike at the “Top Gun” bar | Wheelchair cosplay | The dancing monster Fashion: Her Universe Fashion Show winners | SoCal Her Universe designers | Interview with Her Universe’s Ashley Eckstein | The Hero Within clothing line | What cosplay weapons are allowed | The 23 swag backpacks Inside SDCC: A daily guide to TV and movie panels | George Takei and “The Terror” | “Fear the Walking Dead” | Christian comic books | The $1.1 million comic book | Mensa members predict the future | The future of college esports | Super fans: Orlando Jones is Comic-Con’s No. 1 fan | “Steven Universe” | “Dragon Ball Z” world record | Wayward Cocktails “Supernatural” party Things to do: No badge needed for these activities | Comic-Con museum in Balboa Park | Where to drink and party History: The 12-year-old who co-founded Comic-Con | 50 facts about Comic-Con’s 50 years The big issues: Service animals are superheroes | Cosplay, panels reflect diversity | Security measures  
20 Jul 19
Orange County Register
Who better to tell a rapt San Diego Comic-Con crowd how to follow people and evade surveillance than a pair of ex-CIA spooks come in from the cold. A pair of former spies with “The Agency” told a Comic-Con audience at the San Diego Convention Center how to “hypothetically” conduct and escape surveillance — for storytelling purposes in spy novels, scripts and comics. The Spy and Espionage Tech panel at Comic-Con featured espionage experts, detectives and former spies discussing espionage techniques of the past, present and future. “Everything I’m going to tell you is hypothetical,” former CIA agent Jason Hanson said to knowing laughter. “Remember that, hypothetical.” Hanson, who was with the CIA for 7 years, now runs the Utah-based Spy, Escape and Evasion, which teaches everyday people how to escape duct tape, pick locks, detect lies, crash cars and conduct surveillance. “We went to Hollywood. We were intrigued by their ability to build deceptions and illusions,” former CIA chief of disguise Jonna Mendez told the Comic-Con audience. “For God and country, they gave us some lessons.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] Mendez belonged to an office at the agency that was the equivalent of the Q Branch in the James Bond novels that created surveillance bugs, phony documents and camera pens. Mendez is the wife of former CIA officer Tony Mendez, the subject of the 2012 film “Argo.” Here are 6 CIA-tested espionage techniques you can use the next time you need to conduct or escape surveillance — hypothetically speaking, of course. 1. Twins and Triplets “We used Hollywood as a vehicle to teach us a little bit about teleportation,” Mendez said. “How to make twins. It’s what they do in the magic acts. We discovered we could make twins, too.” The CIA would create twins or triplets to throw off surveillance, Mendez said. “We could rig it where they weren’t sure if it was you, or you No. 2,” Mendez said. “Then the real you could step out of the picture.” 2. Secret Disguises “Disguise has become not just a great tool to have in your bag of tools, it has become a form of body armor around the world,” Mendez said. “It will protect you in a lot of situations.” “We could do anything with disguise that we put our minds to,” Mendez said. “We could do ethnic changes. We could make you Chinese, we could make you African, we could make you Indian. We could make you anything you needed.” “We could do gender changes,” Mendez said. “We could turn women into men and men into women.” 3. Mobile Sniffer Machines Tailing bad guys in a car is not as easy as it looks in the movies. The surveillance vehicle can’t just be two car lengths behind and avoid detection. “Maybe there would be an additive you could pour in a gas tank,” Hanson said. “You pour that additive into the gas tank and then it emits a certain smell.” A trailing vehicle with a sniffing machine can follow the exhaust of the suspect’s car without drawing attention. 4. Cell Phone Magic Wands Drug dealers and mafiosos use burner phones to hide their identity. “All you’ve got to do is have somebody get within 20 yards,” Hanson said. “The ‘magic wand,’ as we call it, will read all the electronic serial numbers on the cell phones.” With the cell phone serial numbers, spies can follow their targets undetected. Even if the bad guys are using burner phones. 5. Tag, Track and Locate What’s the best way to get a listening device into a home with the help of the person under surveillance? Follow their shopping habits. “If I know he goes to 7-Eleven and he loves Coke and he always buys a 6-pack every Friday, well all I’ve got to do is tag the many 6-packs of Coke in that 7-Eleven,” Hanson said. “I can put listening devices on multiples of them — remember, hypothetical. If he brings that 6-pack of Coke in his house, maybe I’m going to hear something.” Shampoo or laundry detergent might be a better Trojan Horse because they would stay in the house longer than Coca-Cola, which might be consumed faster. 6. Cell Phone Microphones and Cameras “There are multiple ways these days to track you,” Hanson said. “Most of us just have cell phones. We can turn on your microphones or we can turn on your cameras very easily — if you were the government and were allowed to do that stuff. It’s easier than ever these days to track people.” In addition to Hanson and Mendez, the Comic-Con panelists included cyber defense expert Josh Ray and genetic genealogist Barbara Rae-Venter. The panel was moderated by Dent the Future co-founder Steve Broback. READ MORE about SDCC 2019: Photo galleries: Cosplay | Scenes from Comic-Con | Her Universe Fashion Show | Preview night Recaps: Day 2 | Day 1 | 5 memorable moments from opening day |Preview night and the Running of the Nerds Only at Comic-Con: Tom Cruise lookalike at the “Top Gun” bar | Wheelchair cosplay | The dancing monster Fashion: Her Universe Fashion Show winners | SoCal Her Universe designers | Interview with Her Universe’s Ashley Eckstein | The Hero Within clothing line | What cosplay weapons are allowed | The 23 swag backpacks Inside SDCC: A daily guide to TV and movie panels | George Takei and “The Terror” | “Fear the Walking Dead” | Christian comic books | The $1.1 million comic book | Mensa members predict the future | The future of college esports | Super fans: Orlando Jones is Comic-Con’s No. 1 fan | “Steven Universe” | “Dragon Ball Z” world record | Wayward Cocktails “Supernatural” party Things to do: No badge needed for these activities | Comic-Con museum in Balboa Park | Where to drink and party History: The 12-year-old who co-founded Comic-Con | 50 facts about Comic-Con’s 50 years The big issues: Service animals are superheroes | Cosplay, panels reflect diversity | Security measures  
20 Jul 19
Daily News
Who better to tell a rapt San Diego Comic-Con crowd how to follow people and evade surveillance than a pair of ex-CIA spooks come in from the cold. A pair of former spies with “The Agency” told a Comic-Con audience at the San Diego Convention Center how to “hypothetically” conduct and escape surveillance — for storytelling purposes in spy novels, scripts and comics. The Spy and Espionage Tech panel at Comic-Con featured espionage experts, detectives and former spies discussing espionage techniques of the past, present and future. “Everything I’m going to tell you is hypothetical,” former CIA agent Jason Hanson said to knowing laughter. “Remember that, hypothetical.” Hanson, who was with the CIA for 7 years, now runs the Utah-based Spy, Escape and Evasion, which teaches everyday people how to escape duct tape, pick locks, detect lies, crash cars and conduct surveillance. “We went to Hollywood. We were intrigued by their ability to build deceptions and illusions,” former CIA chief of disguise Jonna Mendez told the Comic-Con audience. “For God and country, they gave us some lessons.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] Mendez belonged to an office at the agency that was the equivalent of the Q Branch in the James Bond novels that created surveillance bugs, phony documents and camera pens. Mendez is the wife of former CIA officer Tony Mendez, the subject of the 2012 film “Argo.” Here are 6 CIA-tested espionage techniques you can use the next time you need to conduct or escape surveillance — hypothetically speaking, of course. 1. Twins and Triplets “We used Hollywood as a vehicle to teach us a little bit about teleportation,” Mendez said. “How to make twins. It’s what they do in the magic acts. We discovered we could make twins, too.” The CIA would create twins or triplets to throw off surveillance, Mendez said. “We could rig it where they weren’t sure if it was you, or you No. 2,” Mendez said. “Then the real you could step out of the picture.” 2. Secret Disguises “Disguise has become not just a great tool to have in your bag of tools, it has become a form of body armor around the world,” Mendez said. “It will protect you in a lot of situations.” “We could do anything with disguise that we put our minds to,” Mendez said. “We could do ethnic changes. We could make you Chinese, we could make you African, we could make you Indian. We could make you anything you needed.” “We could do gender changes,” Mendez said. “We could turn women into men and men into women.” 3. Mobile Sniffer Machines Tailing bad guys in a car is not as easy as it looks in the movies. The surveillance vehicle can’t just be two car lengths behind and avoid detection. “Maybe there would be an additive you could pour in a gas tank,” Hanson said. “You pour that additive into the gas tank and then it emits a certain smell.” A trailing vehicle with a sniffing machine can follow the exhaust of the suspect’s car without drawing attention. 4. Cell Phone Magic Wands Drug dealers and mafiosos use burner phones to hide their identity. “All you’ve got to do is have somebody get within 20 yards,” Hanson said. “The ‘magic wand,’ as we call it, will read all the electronic serial numbers on the cell phones.” With the cell phone serial numbers, spies can follow their targets undetected. Even if the bad guys are using burner phones. 5. Tag, Track and Locate What’s the best way to get a listening device into a home with the help of the person under surveillance? Follow their shopping habits. “If I know he goes to 7-Eleven and he loves Coke and he always buys a 6-pack every Friday, well all I’ve got to do is tag the many 6-packs of Coke in that 7-Eleven,” Hanson said. “I can put listening devices on multiples of them — remember, hypothetical. If he brings that 6-pack of Coke in his house, maybe I’m going to hear something.” Shampoo or laundry detergent might be a better Trojan Horse because they would stay in the house longer than Coca-Cola, which might be consumed faster. 6. Cell Phone Microphones and Cameras “There are multiple ways these days to track you,” Hanson said. “Most of us just have cell phones. We can turn on your microphones or we can turn on your cameras very easily — if you were the government and were allowed to do that stuff. It’s easier than ever these days to track people.” In addition to Hanson and Mendez, the Comic-Con panelists included cyber defense expert Josh Ray and genetic genealogist Barbara Rae-Venter. The panel was moderated by Dent the Future co-founder Steve Broback. READ MORE about SDCC 2019: Photo galleries: Cosplay | Scenes from Comic-Con | Her Universe Fashion Show | Preview night Recaps: Day 2 | Day 1 | 5 memorable moments from opening day |Preview night and the Running of the Nerds Only at Comic-Con: Tom Cruise lookalike at the “Top Gun” bar | Wheelchair cosplay | The dancing monster Fashion: Her Universe Fashion Show winners | SoCal Her Universe designers | Interview with Her Universe’s Ashley Eckstein | The Hero Within clothing line | What cosplay weapons are allowed | The 23 swag backpacks Inside SDCC: A daily guide to TV and movie panels | George Takei and “The Terror” | “Fear the Walking Dead” | Christian comic books | The $1.1 million comic book | Mensa members predict the future | The future of college esports | Super fans: Orlando Jones is Comic-Con’s No. 1 fan | “Steven Universe” | “Dragon Ball Z” world record | Wayward Cocktails “Supernatural” party Things to do: No badge needed for these activities | Comic-Con museum in Balboa Park | Where to drink and party History: The 12-year-old who co-founded Comic-Con | 50 facts about Comic-Con’s 50 years The big issues: Service animals are superheroes | Cosplay, panels reflect diversity | Security measures  
20 Jul 19
Press Enterprise
Who better to tell a rapt San Diego Comic-Con crowd how to follow people and evade surveillance than a pair of ex-CIA spooks come in from the cold. A pair of former spies with “The Agency” told a Comic-Con audience at the San Diego Convention Center how to “hypothetically” conduct and escape surveillance — for storytelling purposes in spy novels, scripts and comics. The Spy and Espionage Tech panel at Comic-Con featured espionage experts, detectives and former spies discussing espionage techniques of the past, present and future. “Everything I’m going to tell you is hypothetical,” former CIA agent Jason Hanson said to knowing laughter. “Remember that, hypothetical.” Hanson, who was with the CIA for 7 years, now runs the Utah-based Spy, Escape and Evasion, which teaches everyday people how to escape duct tape, pick locks, detect lies, crash cars and conduct surveillance. “We went to Hollywood. We were intrigued by their ability to build deceptions and illusions,” former CIA chief of disguise Jonna Mendez told the Comic-Con audience. “For God and country, they gave us some lessons.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] Mendez belonged to an office at the agency that was the equivalent of the Q Branch in the James Bond novels that created surveillance bugs, phony documents and camera pens. Mendez is the wife of former CIA officer Tony Mendez, the subject of the 2012 film “Argo.” Here are 6 CIA-tested espionage techniques you can use the next time you need to conduct or escape surveillance — hypothetically speaking, of course. 1. Twins and Triplets “We used Hollywood as a vehicle to teach us a little bit about teleportation,” Mendez said. “How to make twins. It’s what they do in the magic acts. We discovered we could make twins, too.” The CIA would create twins or triplets to throw off surveillance, Mendez said. “We could rig it where they weren’t sure if it was you, or you No. 2,” Mendez said. “Then the real you could step out of the picture.” 2. Secret Disguises “Disguise has become not just a great tool to have in your bag of tools, it has become a form of body armor around the world,” Mendez said. “It will protect you in a lot of situations.” “We could do anything with disguise that we put our minds to,” Mendez said. “We could do ethnic changes. We could make you Chinese, we could make you African, we could make you Indian. We could make you anything you needed.” “We could do gender changes,” Mendez said. “We could turn women into men and men into women.” 3. Mobile Sniffer Machines Tailing bad guys in a car is not as easy as it looks in the movies. The surveillance vehicle can’t just be two car lengths behind and avoid detection. “Maybe there would be an additive you could pour in a gas tank,” Hanson said. “You pour that additive into the gas tank and then it emits a certain smell.” A trailing vehicle with a sniffing machine can follow the exhaust of the suspect’s car without drawing attention. 4. Cell Phone Magic Wands Drug dealers and mafiosos use burner phones to hide their identity. “All you’ve got to do is have somebody get within 20 yards,” Hanson said. “The ‘magic wand,’ as we call it, will read all the electronic serial numbers on the cell phones.” With the cell phone serial numbers, spies can follow their targets undetected. Even if the bad guys are using burner phones. 5. Tag, Track and Locate What’s the best way to get a listening device into a home with the help of the person under surveillance? Follow their shopping habits. “If I know he goes to 7-Eleven and he loves Coke and he always buys a 6-pack every Friday, well all I’ve got to do is tag the many 6-packs of Coke in that 7-Eleven,” Hanson said. “I can put listening devices on multiples of them — remember, hypothetical. If he brings that 6-pack of Coke in his house, maybe I’m going to hear something.” Shampoo or laundry detergent might be a better Trojan Horse because they would stay in the house longer than Coca-Cola, which might be consumed faster. 6. Cell Phone Microphones and Cameras “There are multiple ways these days to track you,” Hanson said. “Most of us just have cell phones. We can turn on your microphones or we can turn on your cameras very easily — if you were the government and were allowed to do that stuff. It’s easier than ever these days to track people.” In addition to Hanson and Mendez, the Comic-Con panelists included cyber defense expert Josh Ray and genetic genealogist Barbara Rae-Venter. The panel was moderated by Dent the Future co-founder Steve Broback. READ MORE about SDCC 2019: Photo galleries: Cosplay | Scenes from Comic-Con | Her Universe Fashion Show | Preview night Recaps: Day 2 | Day 1 | 5 memorable moments from opening day |Preview night and the Running of the Nerds Only at Comic-Con: Tom Cruise lookalike at the “Top Gun” bar | Wheelchair cosplay | The dancing monster Fashion: Her Universe Fashion Show winners | SoCal Her Universe designers | Interview with Her Universe’s Ashley Eckstein | The Hero Within clothing line | What cosplay weapons are allowed | The 23 swag backpacks Inside SDCC: A daily guide to TV and movie panels | George Takei and “The Terror” | “Fear the Walking Dead” | Christian comic books | The $1.1 million comic book | Mensa members predict the future | The future of college esports | Super fans: Orlando Jones is Comic-Con’s No. 1 fan | “Steven Universe” | “Dragon Ball Z” world record | Wayward Cocktails “Supernatural” party Things to do: No badge needed for these activities | Comic-Con museum in Balboa Park | Where to drink and party History: The 12-year-old who co-founded Comic-Con | 50 facts about Comic-Con’s 50 years The big issues: Service animals are superheroes | Cosplay, panels reflect diversity | Security measures  
20 Jul 19
San Gabriel Valley Tribune
Who better to tell a rapt San Diego Comic-Con crowd how to follow people and evade surveillance than a pair of ex-CIA spooks come in from the cold. A pair of former spies with “The Agency” told a Comic-Con audience at the San Diego Convention Center how to “hypothetically” conduct and escape surveillance — for storytelling purposes in spy novels, scripts and comics. The Spy and Espionage Tech panel at Comic-Con featured espionage experts, detectives and former spies discussing espionage techniques of the past, present and future. “Everything I’m going to tell you is hypothetical,” former CIA agent Jason Hanson said to knowing laughter. “Remember that, hypothetical.” Hanson, who was with the CIA for 7 years, now runs the Utah-based Spy, Escape and Evasion, which teaches everyday people how to escape duct tape, pick locks, detect lies, crash cars and conduct surveillance. “We went to Hollywood. We were intrigued by their ability to build deceptions and illusions,” former CIA chief of disguise Jonna Mendez told the Comic-Con audience. “For God and country, they gave us some lessons.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] Mendez belonged to an office at the agency that was the equivalent of the Q Branch in the James Bond novels that created surveillance bugs, phony documents and camera pens. Mendez is the wife of former CIA officer Tony Mendez, the subject of the 2012 film “Argo.” Here are 6 CIA-tested espionage techniques you can use the next time you need to conduct or escape surveillance — hypothetically speaking, of course. 1. Twins and Triplets “We used Hollywood as a vehicle to teach us a little bit about teleportation,” Mendez said. “How to make twins. It’s what they do in the magic acts. We discovered we could make twins, too.” The CIA would create twins or triplets to throw off surveillance, Mendez said. “We could rig it where they weren’t sure if it was you, or you No. 2,” Mendez said. “Then the real you could step out of the picture.” 2. Secret Disguises “Disguise has become not just a great tool to have in your bag of tools, it has become a form of body armor around the world,” Mendez said. “It will protect you in a lot of situations.” “We could do anything with disguise that we put our minds to,” Mendez said. “We could do ethnic changes. We could make you Chinese, we could make you African, we could make you Indian. We could make you anything you needed.” “We could do gender changes,” Mendez said. “We could turn women into men and men into women.” 3. Mobile Sniffer Machines Tailing bad guys in a car is not as easy as it looks in the movies. The surveillance vehicle can’t just be two car lengths behind and avoid detection. “Maybe there would be an additive you could pour in a gas tank,” Hanson said. “You pour that additive into the gas tank and then it emits a certain smell.” A trailing vehicle with a sniffing machine can follow the exhaust of the suspect’s car without drawing attention. 4. Cell Phone Magic Wands Drug dealers and mafiosos use burner phones to hide their identity. “All you’ve got to do is have somebody get within 20 yards,” Hanson said. “The ‘magic wand,’ as we call it, will read all the electronic serial numbers on the cell phones.” With the cell phone serial numbers, spies can follow their targets undetected. Even if the bad guys are using burner phones. 5. Tag, Track and Locate What’s the best way to get a listening device into a home with the help of the person under surveillance? Follow their shopping habits. “If I know he goes to 7-Eleven and he loves Coke and he always buys a 6-pack every Friday, well all I’ve got to do is tag the many 6-packs of Coke in that 7-Eleven,” Hanson said. “I can put listening devices on multiples of them — remember, hypothetical. If he brings that 6-pack of Coke in his house, maybe I’m going to hear something.” Shampoo or laundry detergent might be a better Trojan Horse because they would stay in the house longer than Coca-Cola, which might be consumed faster. 6. Cell Phone Microphones and Cameras “There are multiple ways these days to track you,” Hanson said. “Most of us just have cell phones. We can turn on your microphones or we can turn on your cameras very easily — if you were the government and were allowed to do that stuff. It’s easier than ever these days to track people.” In addition to Hanson and Mendez, the Comic-Con panelists included cyber defense expert Josh Ray and genetic genealogist Barbara Rae-Venter. The panel was moderated by Dent the Future co-founder Steve Broback. READ MORE about SDCC 2019: Photo galleries: Cosplay | Scenes from Comic-Con | Her Universe Fashion Show | Preview night Recaps: Day 2 | Day 1 | 5 memorable moments from opening day |Preview night and the Running of the Nerds Only at Comic-Con: Tom Cruise lookalike at the “Top Gun” bar | Wheelchair cosplay | The dancing monster Fashion: Her Universe Fashion Show winners | SoCal Her Universe designers | Interview with Her Universe’s Ashley Eckstein | The Hero Within clothing line | What cosplay weapons are allowed | The 23 swag backpacks Inside SDCC: A daily guide to TV and movie panels | George Takei and “The Terror” | “Fear the Walking Dead” | Christian comic books | The $1.1 million comic book | Mensa members predict the future | The future of college esports | Super fans: Orlando Jones is Comic-Con’s No. 1 fan | “Steven Universe” | “Dragon Ball Z” world record | Wayward Cocktails “Supernatural” party Things to do: No badge needed for these activities | Comic-Con museum in Balboa Park | Where to drink and party History: The 12-year-old who co-founded Comic-Con | 50 facts about Comic-Con’s 50 years The big issues: Service animals are superheroes | Cosplay, panels reflect diversity | Security measures  
20 Jul 19
Daily Breeze
Who better to tell a rapt San Diego Comic-Con crowd how to follow people and evade surveillance than a pair of ex-CIA spooks come in from the cold. A pair of former spies with “The Agency” told a Comic-Con audience at the San Diego Convention Center how to “hypothetically” conduct and escape surveillance — for storytelling purposes in spy novels, scripts and comics. The Spy and Espionage Tech panel at Comic-Con featured espionage experts, detectives and former spies discussing espionage techniques of the past, present and future. “Everything I’m going to tell you is hypothetical,” former CIA agent Jason Hanson said to knowing laughter. “Remember that, hypothetical.” Hanson, who was with the CIA for 7 years, now runs the Utah-based Spy, Escape and Evasion, which teaches everyday people how to escape duct tape, pick locks, detect lies, crash cars and conduct surveillance. “We went to Hollywood. We were intrigued by their ability to build deceptions and illusions,” former CIA chief of disguise Jonna Mendez told the Comic-Con audience. “For God and country, they gave us some lessons.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] Mendez belonged to an office at the agency that was the equivalent of the Q Branch in the James Bond novels that created surveillance bugs, phony documents and camera pens. Mendez is the wife of former CIA officer Tony Mendez, the subject of the 2012 film “Argo.” Here are 6 CIA-tested espionage techniques you can use the next time you need to conduct or escape surveillance — hypothetically speaking, of course. 1. Twins and Triplets “We used Hollywood as a vehicle to teach us a little bit about teleportation,” Mendez said. “How to make twins. It’s what they do in the magic acts. We discovered we could make twins, too.” The CIA would create twins or triplets to throw off surveillance, Mendez said. “We could rig it where they weren’t sure if it was you, or you No. 2,” Mendez said. “Then the real you could step out of the picture.” 2. Secret Disguises “Disguise has become not just a great tool to have in your bag of tools, it has become a form of body armor around the world,” Mendez said. “It will protect you in a lot of situations.” “We could do anything with disguise that we put our minds to,” Mendez said. “We could do ethnic changes. We could make you Chinese, we could make you African, we could make you Indian. We could make you anything you needed.” “We could do gender changes,” Mendez said. “We could turn women into men and men into women.” 3. Mobile Sniffer Machines Tailing bad guys in a car is not as easy as it looks in the movies. The surveillance vehicle can’t just be two car lengths behind and avoid detection. “Maybe there would be an additive you could pour in a gas tank,” Hanson said. “You pour that additive into the gas tank and then it emits a certain smell.” A trailing vehicle with a sniffing machine can follow the exhaust of the suspect’s car without drawing attention. 4. Cell Phone Magic Wands Drug dealers and mafiosos use burner phones to hide their identity. “All you’ve got to do is have somebody get within 20 yards,” Hanson said. “The ‘magic wand,’ as we call it, will read all the electronic serial numbers on the cell phones.” With the cell phone serial numbers, spies can follow their targets undetected. Even if the bad guys are using burner phones. 5. Tag, Track and Locate What’s the best way to get a listening device into a home with the help of the person under surveillance? Follow their shopping habits. “If I know he goes to 7-Eleven and he loves Coke and he always buys a 6-pack every Friday, well all I’ve got to do is tag the many 6-packs of Coke in that 7-Eleven,” Hanson said. “I can put listening devices on multiples of them — remember, hypothetical. If he brings that 6-pack of Coke in his house, maybe I’m going to hear something.” Shampoo or laundry detergent might be a better Trojan Horse because they would stay in the house longer than Coca-Cola, which might be consumed faster. 6. Cell Phone Microphones and Cameras “There are multiple ways these days to track you,” Hanson said. “Most of us just have cell phones. We can turn on your microphones or we can turn on your cameras very easily — if you were the government and were allowed to do that stuff. It’s easier than ever these days to track people.” In addition to Hanson and Mendez, the Comic-Con panelists included cyber defense expert Josh Ray and genetic genealogist Barbara Rae-Venter. The panel was moderated by Dent the Future co-founder Steve Broback. READ MORE about SDCC 2019: Photo galleries: Cosplay | Scenes from Comic-Con | Her Universe Fashion Show | Preview night Recaps: Day 2 | Day 1 | 5 memorable moments from opening day |Preview night and the Running of the Nerds Only at Comic-Con: Tom Cruise lookalike at the “Top Gun” bar | Wheelchair cosplay | The dancing monster Fashion: Her Universe Fashion Show winners | SoCal Her Universe designers | Interview with Her Universe’s Ashley Eckstein | The Hero Within clothing line | What cosplay weapons are allowed | The 23 swag backpacks Inside SDCC: A daily guide to TV and movie panels | George Takei and “The Terror” | “Fear the Walking Dead” | Christian comic books | The $1.1 million comic book | Mensa members predict the future | The future of college esports | Super fans: Orlando Jones is Comic-Con’s No. 1 fan | “Steven Universe” | “Dragon Ball Z” world record | Wayward Cocktails “Supernatural” party Things to do: No badge needed for these activities | Comic-Con museum in Balboa Park | Where to drink and party History: The 12-year-old who co-founded Comic-Con | 50 facts about Comic-Con’s 50 years The big issues: Service animals are superheroes | Cosplay, panels reflect diversity | Security measures