College Television

20 May 19
Dating, Breaking News, Celeb Gossip & Everything College | CC

English Actress Lena Headey is best known for her chilling portrayal of the most ruthless queen in television history —  Cersei Lannister in Game of Thrones. She has been nominated for four Primetime Emmy Awards and one Golden Globe for Best Supporting Actress in a drama series in 2017. TV Critics have consistently argued that she […]

20 May 19
The Ukiah Daily Journal
2019 is the 100th anniversary of the first Waldorf school being founded in Stuttgart, Germany, and is also the year Kayla Meadows is retiring. She has been teaching kindergarten for 30 years, 19 of them at River Oak Charter School, and 11 years before that at The Waldorf School of Mendocino County in Calpella. There are over 1,100 Waldorf schools and almost 2,000 Waldorf kindergartens around the world. There are about 150 Waldorf schools in North America, and three of them are here in Mendocino County. After River Oaks annual Pastels on the Plaza fundraiser was postponed due to rain, Meadows leads the kindergarten class in a traditional maypole celebration inside her classroom. (Chris Pugh — Ukiah Daily Journal) Waldorf education began in the aftermath of WWI with Austrian scientist and thinker Rudolph Steiner. While visiting the Waldorf-Astoria cigarette factory, he spoke to the workers about social renewal, and was asked by the factory’s owner if he would start a school for the children of the employees of the company. Stuttgart’s name derives from the original Stutengarten, which means mare’s garden, and is the home of Porsche and Mercedes-Benz. Waldorf education has been in North America since 1928. One of Steiner’s quotes is, “If we do not believe within ourselves this deeply rooted feeling that there is something higher than ourselves, we shall never find the strength to evolve into something higher.” Meadows herself has fully immersed her career in the Waldorf method of teaching kindergarten, and shared her vast wisdom in this alternative form of early childhood education with her students, their families, and fellow educators. Kindergarten teacher Kaya Meadows (middle) who has been teaching for the past 30 years is retiring from River Oak Charter School at the end of this school year. (Chris Pugh — Ukiah Daily Journal) Meadows states, “What’s important about kindergarten is learning how to get along with other people. They learn a lot, but it’s in the essence of play. Help in cooking is chemistry. Building blocks is physics. They need to learn to be cooperative or it won’t work. They need to learn how to relate to other people. When they see me moving a puppet, that’s human interaction, and that’s what’s important. That’s why I’m a Waldorf educator, to teach them to fulfill their greatest capacity of being.” Specifically written into their charter is not having to teach reading and writing in kindergarten. This is certainly controversial in the field of education, but nevertheless for Meadows’ students, her kindergarten has provided an enriching year of learning, for families who have chosen the Waldorf option. Meadows remembers playing with her sister and her dolls as a child, and going out on the Mississippi with her father in a little boat called Bold Venture. She was a Candy Striper hospital volunteer in a children’s ward, and later worked for two summers in an Iowa state mental hospital in a children’s ward while in college. At University of Iowa, she studied Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, and Psychology. Later, as a single mom, she earned her Waldorf teaching credential for kindergarten and the grades at Rudolf Steiner College, which was near Fair Oaks, here in California. Waldorf teaching “has really been the focus my entire adult life,” Meadows continues, “and working with the families, not just the children. Kindergarteners are free thinkers. I love to sing, have fun, wear bright colors, and so do the children, so it was really a natural fit. I want to meet you in the present. Every day and every year was a new experience in how you meet the needs of the child, so I just found it very invigorating – singing children into their culture and moving them consciously through space with joy.” “I had all of Jan Hoyman’s and the Frey children in my kindergarten. Laurel Near’s son asked me if this was my home. At the time the school was called Mountain Meadow, so he thought that’s where I lived.” Meadows’ kindergarten contains elements of classical art and nature. On the children’s water play table sits a very large, beautiful ceramic bowl that Jan Hoyman made for her. Prints of Raphael’s Mother and Child painting and Grace Hudson’s Pomo Mother and Child are on the walls. There is a place for a nature garden which changes with the seasons in class, the paper is 100% cotton, and the crayons are beeswax. There are wood blocks instead of Legos, because the children have an understanding of where wood comes from, rather than plastic. “Our circle is a moving circle. We sing, we dance, we move. They need to move because that’s where they are developmentally. And through their play they learn about the world.” Meadows memorizes a story about each child, with details given to her by their parents, to tell them on their birthdays. She makes a gift for each child that she gives them on their birthdays and at the winter holiday season. When asked what she hopes has been her greatest gift to kindergarteners in their early childhood education, she states, “Probably that they know that they’re loved and how good it is to have fun. And if you’re going to do something, do it well.” Andrea Maples, who has had two of her children in Mrs. Meadows kindergarten, says, “We love her. She’s very nurturing but at the same time she knows how to handle my children, so I appreciate that. She was really good in the transition of when my husband and I were separating. She’s very loving. We’re going to be sad to see her go.” Charlotte Scott says, “I had two of my older stepchildren, who are now nearly adults, and my nine-year old with her. I learned a lot about parenting from her, and I learned about the Steiner method and Waldorf. I saw all the children really thrive with her. I think she has a great ability to connect with children, and I love the stability in her classroom. She’s really an expert, and she’ll be greatly missed.” Mrs. Meadows started the protected pumpkin path, as a healthy alternative to people going trick-or-treating, while she was teaching at The Waldorf School of Mendocino County in Calpella. She says, “All of life is a festival: one thing after another, just to embrace life.” When asked what changes she has seen as having the most impact on childhood in the past 30 years, she immediately states, “Media. People on their cell phone too much. People not communicating with each other. Too much time watching a screen. When I was student teaching, I worked with master teachers at Rudolf Steiner College. When a teacher said, ‘You can tell if a child watches television or not,’ I thought that was really silly, but you can.” Meadows explains to her students about the pauses in great music, and how pauses are also important in our lives. “People think you need to be doing something for your child. Sometimes children and their families just need to be together and not do anything. They don’t need to do things to enrich their child’s life; they just need to spend time together and read together.” When asked what she will miss the most about teaching, Meadows responds, “I guess just being with the children. Maybe storytelling, the look of awe and wonder on their faces.” She has traveled to 59 countries over the years, including several international Kindergarten conferences. “I used to do the opening for each school year for many years here, and would bring something about the country I just traveled to.” Her son now lives in Singapore with his wife and two children, and is an executive with Google in the Far East. She states, “My son works for Google and he’s brilliant because of his Waldorf education and because he was read to every day.” In addition, she helped to raise her husband’s son, and her husband has a daughter. When asked what she has loved most about being a teacher, and her thoughts on her upcoming retirement, she speaks about recalling her father’s boat the Bold Venture going out on the Mississippi each week. She says, “I was thinking about the journey…I was thinking about the journey I’ve taken as a teacher, and all the people I’ve experienced as a human being, will be with me. The journey and the joy that I’ve experienced. But I am excited about taking them in my boat – and not just the children, the parents, too, in my own Bold Venture.” A retirement party for Mrs. Meadows will be held on Thursday, May 23 at 4 p.m. at Todd Grove Park. It is a potluck, and a green event, in which you’re asked to bring your own cups and plates. Friends, family, colleagues, parents and students of all the generations she has taught are invited. Mrs. Meadows would like to plant a retirement garden, so any perennials as a gift would be welcomed.
20 May 19
Jefferson County Daily News

Mt. Vernon Police Department Police received a report at 8:25 a.m. on Friday, May 17, that a window of a vehicle had been broken out while it was parked in the 1100 block of Gaskins Avenue. A battery was reported at 5:12 p.m. from the 700 block of Lamar Avenue. Police responded to a report […]

20 May 19
Heavy.com

HoopsHype’s Alex Kennedy drops by Scoop B Radio and shares thoughts on Kareem Abdul Jabbar & Hakeem Olajuwon. Heavy.com’s Brandon ‘Scoop B’ Robinson reports.

20 May 19
Ashbroyale

grown-ish Season 2 | Zoey Finds Out About Ana & Aaron | Freeform SUBSCRIBE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8rREdMMfZT4 : Ana tries to defend herself when Zoey finds out the truth about her relationship with Aaron. grown-ish season 2 continues June 5th on Freeform! What to watch next: more grown-ish clips! SUBSCRIBE: https://www.youtube.com/freeformnetwork?sub_confirmation=1 Watch Full Episodes of grown-ish Season […]

20 May 19
The Blog of Joelsuf

This year will mark thirty years that I have watched wrestling. And after 30 years, I am going to walk away from watching it on TV for a very long time, at least until next year when WWE will host Wrestlemania in Tampa, which is very close to me. If I’m interested and/or have the […]

20 May 19
Archy news nety

We remember those celebrities who have recently died for the music they created (Doris Day, Scott Walker, Dick Dale, Keith Flint of The Prodigy), the characters they portrayed (Peggy Lipton's Julie Barnes, Peter Mayhews Chewbacca), her groundbreaking sports careers (Frank Robinson), her films (John Singleton, Bernardo Bertolucci), her books (Tom Wolfe, Steve Ditko), her brain […]

20 May 19
Bluebonnet News

By Vanesa Brashier, editor@bluebonnetnews.com A Splendora senior is celebrating another milestone in his life – graduation – after successfully battling Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia six years ago. Cristian Beasley is now looking forward to pursuing a career in welding and possibly continuing his education at Lone Star College in Kingwood. Six years ago, Beasley, son of […]

20 May 19
Breaking News, Entertainment, Sports & College Life | COED

While Game of Thrones built its reputation as one of the greatest television shows of all-time through its meticulous plotting, planning, and portrayal of politics, the show remained very much about the violence that spurs these politics forward and the various warriors behind the bloodshed. From early seasons entries such as Ned Stark and Khal Drogo to […]

20 May 19
Life in Lists

Once I find a show that I love, it doesn’t take long before it basically takes over my life. And by that I mean I can finish a normal 20-episode season in only a few days. That being said, there are only a few series that have managed to keep me re-watching for years. If […]

20 May 19
Journalism History journal

  Does the “Marketplace of Ideas” Metaphor Still Apply? Social media networks have come under fire for their role in recent election controversies.  Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg indicated during Congressional testimony that some form of regulation of social media was “inevitable” after the revelation that his company shared users’ private information with a data mining […]

20 May 19
Thinking Pacifism

Ted Grimsrud—May 20, 2019 I can imagine several ways that the question I ask in the title of this post could go, so I want to start by explaining what I mean. By pacifism, I have in mind the principled unwillingness to support or participate in warfare or other forms of lethal violence (though I […]

20 May 19
WatchDog Cinema

Our watch has ended.  Game of Thrones, the show that has captivated our minds and lives the last 8 years has finally finished its run.  And what a run it was.  I remember hearing about the show my freshman year of college as it was about to enter it’s sixth season.  Once me and my […]