Collins

23 Feb 19
AREA Chicago Archive

Excerpts from an intergenerational dialogue held at the South Side Community Art Center on October 23, 2008 between father and daughter Robert (Bob) Crawford and Margo Natalie Crawford. Photographer Bob Crawford defies the boundaries between documentary-style photography and art photography. As a photographer of the Black Arts and Black Power Movements in the 1960s and […]

23 Feb 19
Lake County Record-Bee
BAKERSFIELD — Upper Lake High School’s super siblings of Junior Fernandez and Adriana Lopez, and Kelseyville’s Jasmin Clarke are just two victories away from claiming state titles after winning their quarterfinal-round matches on Friday afternoon during day two of the CIF State Boys and Girls Wrestling Championships at the Rabobank Arena in Baksersfield. Fernandez, the No. 5 seed in the 132-pound division of the boys tournament, scored a two-point reversal with 26 seconds left to beat No. 4 seed Henry Porter of Oakdale High School 6-5. Lopez, the No. 3 seed in the 121-pound division of the girls tournament, defeated No. 6 seed Katie Gomez of Birmingham High School 9-5. Clarke, unseeded at 189 pounds, beat No. 7 seed Cianna Riley of San Dimas High School 2-1. “I have never been more proud as their coach and father than I am right now,” Upper Lake head coach Jose Fernandez said. “This is the best feeling in the whole world.” Semifinal-round matches take place early Saturday as the tournaments draw to a close. If Fernandez can beat No. 1 seed Kyle Parco of Concord’s De La Salle High School in the semifinals, he’ll move on to the 132-pound finals Saturday night against the winner of the other semifinal between No. 2 seed Ryan Franco of Clovis North High School and No. 3 Marcus Polanco of Bishop Amat High School. Parco owns two wins over Fernandez this season —10-5 in the semifinals of the Doc Buchanan Invitational and 7-5 in the finals of the North Coast Section Championships last weekend in Union City. Fernandez also beat Franco, who was the No. 1 seed at the Doc Buchanan. Lopez, the two-time North Coast Section champion at 121 pounds and a two-time state medalist, draws No. 2 seed Melanie Mendoza of Selma High School in her semifinal match. A victory would move Lopez into the championship match against the winner of the other semifinal between No. 1 seed Ashley Venegas of Mount Whitney High School and No. 5 Evelyn Calhoun of Menlo Atherton High School. Clarke beat her second straight seeded wrestler to reach the semifinals against No. 3 seed Joanna Hendricks of Beaumont High School. If the Kelseyville senior defeats another seeded opponent, she’ll draw either No. 1 Folashade Akinola of Menlo Atherton or No. 5 Angela Buenrrostro of Monroe High School in the championship match. Clarke had some help from her quarterfinal-round opponent, who was assessed a penalty point for hands to the face. That tied the match at 1-1 in the second period. Clarke chose the down position to open the third period and immediately escaped from Riley’s grasp to earn what proved to be the decisive point. “Yep, we knew we could get it (escape point) and so we had to go bottom,” Kelseyville assistant coach Orlando Zarate said. Riley scored an escape point in the first period to take a 1-0 lead. “The first period was Jasmin trying to find openings,” Zarate said. “It was 1-0 until the middle of the second period. Jasmin got a hand to the face, which tied it up (at 1-1).” Zarate said Clarke’s semifinal-round opponent, Hendricks, is an unknown commodity. “We haven’t seen her but I’m sure the match will be another brawl,” Zarate said. Clarke, the North Coast Section runner-up this season, finished fourth in the state at 189 pounds a year ago. Also on Friday, Kelseyville 160-pounder Alex Garcia lost 6-0 loss to unseeded Collin Nicholson of Trabuco Hills High School, in the consolation bracket and was eliminated from the boys tournament. Garcia, the Coastal Mountain Conference champion and North Coast Section runner-up this season, won each of his first two matches on Thursday before falling to No. 4 seed Max Wilner in a second-round match, which dropped him into the consolation bracket to open Friday’s action against Nicholson.
23 Feb 19
F3 Louisville

We have a very nice portico at bayside… keeps you warm and dry.  SYITG Collins HS 6:00 sharp.. Glauc Out

23 Feb 19
Best Online Shopping website

“Take Your Hr Career To The Next Level With Your Own Awesome Hr Blog!” Product Name: Take Your Hr Career To The Next Level With Your Own Awesome Hr Blog! [ad_1] Click here to get Take Your Hr Career To The Next Level With Your Own Awesome Hr Blog! at discounted price while it’s still […]

23 Feb 19
The Smokey Wire : National Forest News and Views

This article was prepared by Yale Environment 360. Although its focus is primarily on protecting watersheds, most of the well validated scientific principles that Sound Forest Management is based on are clearly demonstrated in a way that easily shows the value of human intervention in our federal forests for other site/situational specific prescribed purposes as […]

23 Feb 19

[ad_1] WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The Trump administration is denying and delaying more skilled-worker visa petitions than at any time since at least 2015, in keeping with its promise to increase scrutiny of foreign workers, according to data the government released on Friday. U.S. officials say they have made reforms that prioritize American workers, cut down […]

23 Feb 19
Vietnam Virgin Hair

Looking to make a bold beauty move for Autumn, but not exactly sure where to begin? Change is in the hair color, as they say. Get your style, then scroll through our gallery now to find the best color for you.

23 Feb 19
SANJAY SHAH

By JEFF SOMMER and KEITH COLLINS Many people may receive smaller refunds this year than they have in the past, even though their tax burden was reduced. Here’s why. Published: February 21, 2019 at 06:00PM from NYT Your Money https://nyti.ms/2XkQTgq

23 Feb 19
Fashion Trends

When a celebrity shows up to a red carpet event looking beautiful, we know that didn’t all happen miraculously. Behind the scenes, it takes a village of makeup artists, hair experts, and celebrity stylists pulling gowns, shoes, and jewels to get to that final point. The journey, for some stylists, starts months in advance in […]

23 Feb 19
Arcynewsy

A North Carolina judge denied on Friday the constitutional amendment of the state requiring an election ID, citing the prevailing gerrymandering in the general assembly of the state. Wake County Supreme Court Judge, G. Bryan Collins, wrote in a Friday afternoon judgment that the North Carolina General Assembly is so upset that its members do […]

23 Feb 19
harbor financial services reviews

By JEFF SOMMER and KEITH COLLINS Many people may receive smaller refunds this year than they have in the past, even though their tax burden was reduced. Here’s why. Published: February 21, 2019 at 07:00PM from NYT Your Money https://ift.tt/2U364sr via IFTTT

23 Feb 19
chrisnovingerblog

By JEFF SOMMER and KEITH COLLINS Many people may receive smaller refunds this year than they have in the past, even though their tax burden was reduced. Here’s why. Published: February 21, 2019 at 07:00PM from NYT Your Money https://ift.tt/2U364sr via IFTTT

23 Feb 19
Timothy D. Armour

By JEFF SOMMER and KEITH COLLINS Many people may receive smaller refunds this year than they have in the past, even though their tax burden was reduced. Here’s why. Published: February 21, 2019 at 06:00PM

23 Feb 19
The Mercury News
By Mike DeBonis and Paul Sonne | Washington Post WASHINGTON – Congressional Democrats moved rapidly Friday to advance legislation to reject President Donald Trump’s declaration of a national emergency, an effort that will force Republican lawmakers to choose between their support for Trump and their oft-stated opposition to the expansion of presidential power. The measure, introduced Friday, is expected to pass easily in the Democratic-controlled House, where Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said she would bring it up for a vote Tuesday. But the GOP’s dilemma will play out in public view days later in the Republican-controlled Senate, where numerous GOP senators have voiced opposition to Trump’s emergency declaration. [dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=morning-report” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] If Senate Democrats were united, they would need only four Republican defections to pass the measure and send it to Trump’s desk. On Friday, Trump said he would veto the measure “100 percent” if that happened. And he predicted that Congress would be unable to muster the votes to override his veto. “We have too many smart people that want border security, so I can’t imagine it can survive a veto,” Trump said, adding that he expects most Republicans to support him. “I think they’ll stick.” However, conservative commentators and other GOP opinion leaders have been ratcheting up pressure on Republican senators to hold the line against what they view as an unacceptable overreach of presidential authority. For Republicans who routinely accused former President Barack Obama of exceeding his constitutional powers, “this should not be a difficult vote,” said Charlie Sykes, a conservative commentator who edits The Bulwark, an online publication critical of Trump. “There’s not one Republican in Congress who did not object strenuously to Obama’s use of executive authority,” Sykes said. “So it would be monumentally hypocritical for them to turn around and endorse Trump’s use of executive authority to override Congress’s constitutionally mandated power of the purse.” In a nod to that thinking, Pelosi and other Democrats have couched their arguments against the emergency declaration in constitutional terms, arguing that Congress cannot stand idly by while the president usurps the authority of the legislative branch. “We have a separation of powers in our country,” Pelosi told reporters Friday. “We battled against a monarchy – we did not intend to establish one in our country.” While more than a dozen Republican senators have made skeptical comments about Trump’s declaration, only one – Sen. Susan Collins of Maine – has said she would vote to end it. On Friday, aides to several Republican senators who have been critical of using emergency powers to build the wall – including Lamar Alexander of Tennessee, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Ben Sasse of Nebraska and Thom Tillis of North Carolina – either declined to comment or did not respond when asked if those senators planned to vote against Trump’s emergency declaration. In the House, Rep. Justin Amash, R-Mich., is the only Republican among 220 co-sponsors of the Democratic resolution opposing Trump’s emergency declaration. House Democrats expect at least a few others ultimately to support the measure. Republican lawmakers have rarely defied Trump, and then typically on matters of foreign policy. A vote to disapprove of his emergency declaration would strike at a cornerstone of Trump’s presidency – his promise to build a wall on the U.S.-Mexican border – which remains overwhelmingly popular with GOP voters. While Congress considers blocking the declaration, the federal bureaucracy is already lurching into action, searching for money for wall construction. Last week, Congress passed a sweeping spending bill that includes $1.375 billion for border barriers – far short of Trump’s request. So the administration is looking to take an additional $6.1 billion from the Pentagon budget to supplement that funding. On Friday, a senior defense official said the Pentagon is exploring ways to shift more than $2 billion into an account that Congress mandated for counterdrug activities. While that account currently contains only about $85 million, administration officials said plans were underway to transfer in billions more from other defense accounts. The official, who was authorized to speak to reporters by the Pentagon on condition of anonymity, said that while the department has in the past sought approval from Congress for such “reprogrammings,” it is not required by law. The defense official said the administration plans to designate high-priority sections of the border as “drug smuggling corridors” and will coordinate wall construction in those areas through the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. However, the officials said it will be months before that happens, and “longer than months for the completion of construction.” The Pentagon is still assessing which projects to freeze or scrap to free up the $6.1 billion Trump has targeted in this year’s defense budget. In the crosshairs: Projects that haven’t been awarded to contractors yet and projects aimed at fixing or replacing existing facilities rather than building new ones. The Pentagon has ruled out taking money from military housing, the official said. One Democratic congressional aide familiar with the Pentagon plan said it amounted to “a form of money laundering” but said lawmakers would likely have little immediate recourse. Congress has routinely given agencies the power to reprogram unused funds – though those amounts in the past have tended to be in the millions, not billions. The aide, who was not authorized to comment publicly on the matter, said shifting funds would create political fallout. “They are not just going to be sitting around somewhere. You’re going to have to take it away from things that were appropriated for a reason,” the aide said. The president’s political action committee on Friday began rerunning ads on Facebook with a specific message targeting Republican senators. “I want to be able to show all Republican Senators a list of the many American voters that will NOT be happy if the wall isn’t built,” the ads said. “I need YOUR NAME on the list. Sign our Official Petition to the Senate now!” White House and congressional GOP aides said Friday that there was no concentrated effort on Capitol Hill to lobby Republicans to vote against the resolution of disapproval – reflecting a lack of serious concern that many Republicans would defy the president and join an effort to override his veto. In the House, at least 53 Republicans would be needed for a veto override, while 20 of 53 GOP votes would be necessary in the Senate. Josh Holmes, a former top aide to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said he expects the Senate to pass the disapproval resolution but said he sees little chance of 20 Republican senators breaking ranks. That, he said, could give “flexibility” to a few Republican senators to vote their conscience while the remainder of the party holds the line and protects the president’s agenda. Any political fallout, Holmes predicted, would be fleeting. “We had a record-setting government shutdown,” he said. “We’ve had a near-constant debate about the merits and demerits of a wall. I don’t think there is a single American voter who has not formulated an opinion one way or another on that issue. So what a vote would do that two years of daily discussion haven’t eludes me.” Rep. Joaquin Castro, D-Texas, who authored the one-page House resolution, said he would continue calling Republicans over the weekend to build support for the measure and that he was hopeful many would ultimately vote with Democrats to reject the emergency. “This is a historic power grab, and it will require historic unity by members of Congress, Republican and Democrat, liberal and conservative,” he said. With the measure ultimately likely to fail, Democrats are looking at other options to undermine Trump’s emergency declaration. The House Judiciary Committee has set a Thursday hearing on the matter, and Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., has invited White House Counsel Pat Cipollone and Justice Department officials to appear. None have yet confirmed their participation, a committee spokeswoman said Friday. Trump’s move is also being challenged in the federal courts, where several parties – including a coalition of Democratic-led states – have filed lawsuits to overturn the emergency. Pelosi said Friday that House committees continue to study whether the legislature itself could pursue legal action, but have reached no conclusions. “I’m not announcing anything today,” she said. The Washington Post’s Toluse Olorunnipa and Philip Rucker contributed to this report.
23 Feb 19
East Bay Times
By Mike DeBonis and Paul Sonne | Washington Post WASHINGTON – Congressional Democrats moved rapidly Friday to advance legislation to reject President Donald Trump’s declaration of a national emergency, an effort that will force Republican lawmakers to choose between their support for Trump and their oft-stated opposition to the expansion of presidential power. The measure, introduced Friday, is expected to pass easily in the Democratic-controlled House, where Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said she would bring it up for a vote Tuesday. But the GOP’s dilemma will play out in public view days later in the Republican-controlled Senate, where numerous GOP senators have voiced opposition to Trump’s emergency declaration. [dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=morning-report” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] If Senate Democrats were united, they would need only four Republican defections to pass the measure and send it to Trump’s desk. On Friday, Trump said he would veto the measure “100 percent” if that happened. And he predicted that Congress would be unable to muster the votes to override his veto. “We have too many smart people that want border security, so I can’t imagine it can survive a veto,” Trump said, adding that he expects most Republicans to support him. “I think they’ll stick.” However, conservative commentators and other GOP opinion leaders have been ratcheting up pressure on Republican senators to hold the line against what they view as an unacceptable overreach of presidential authority. For Republicans who routinely accused former President Barack Obama of exceeding his constitutional powers, “this should not be a difficult vote,” said Charlie Sykes, a conservative commentator who edits The Bulwark, an online publication critical of Trump. “There’s not one Republican in Congress who did not object strenuously to Obama’s use of executive authority,” Sykes said. “So it would be monumentally hypocritical for them to turn around and endorse Trump’s use of executive authority to override Congress’s constitutionally mandated power of the purse.” In a nod to that thinking, Pelosi and other Democrats have couched their arguments against the emergency declaration in constitutional terms, arguing that Congress cannot stand idly by while the president usurps the authority of the legislative branch. “We have a separation of powers in our country,” Pelosi told reporters Friday. “We battled against a monarchy – we did not intend to establish one in our country.” While more than a dozen Republican senators have made skeptical comments about Trump’s declaration, only one – Sen. Susan Collins of Maine – has said she would vote to end it. On Friday, aides to several Republican senators who have been critical of using emergency powers to build the wall – including Lamar Alexander of Tennessee, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Ben Sasse of Nebraska and Thom Tillis of North Carolina – either declined to comment or did not respond when asked if those senators planned to vote against Trump’s emergency declaration. In the House, Rep. Justin Amash, R-Mich., is the only Republican among 220 co-sponsors of the Democratic resolution opposing Trump’s emergency declaration. House Democrats expect at least a few others ultimately to support the measure. Republican lawmakers have rarely defied Trump, and then typically on matters of foreign policy. A vote to disapprove of his emergency declaration would strike at a cornerstone of Trump’s presidency – his promise to build a wall on the U.S.-Mexican border – which remains overwhelmingly popular with GOP voters. While Congress considers blocking the declaration, the federal bureaucracy is already lurching into action, searching for money for wall construction. Last week, Congress passed a sweeping spending bill that includes $1.375 billion for border barriers – far short of Trump’s request. So the administration is looking to take an additional $6.1 billion from the Pentagon budget to supplement that funding. On Friday, a senior defense official said the Pentagon is exploring ways to shift more than $2 billion into an account that Congress mandated for counterdrug activities. While that account currently contains only about $85 million, administration officials said plans were underway to transfer in billions more from other defense accounts. The official, who was authorized to speak to reporters by the Pentagon on condition of anonymity, said that while the department has in the past sought approval from Congress for such “reprogrammings,” it is not required by law. The defense official said the administration plans to designate high-priority sections of the border as “drug smuggling corridors” and will coordinate wall construction in those areas through the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. However, the officials said it will be months before that happens, and “longer than months for the completion of construction.” The Pentagon is still assessing which projects to freeze or scrap to free up the $6.1 billion Trump has targeted in this year’s defense budget. In the crosshairs: Projects that haven’t been awarded to contractors yet and projects aimed at fixing or replacing existing facilities rather than building new ones. The Pentagon has ruled out taking money from military housing, the official said. One Democratic congressional aide familiar with the Pentagon plan said it amounted to “a form of money laundering” but said lawmakers would likely have little immediate recourse. Congress has routinely given agencies the power to reprogram unused funds – though those amounts in the past have tended to be in the millions, not billions. The aide, who was not authorized to comment publicly on the matter, said shifting funds would create political fallout. “They are not just going to be sitting around somewhere. You’re going to have to take it away from things that were appropriated for a reason,” the aide said. The president’s political action committee on Friday began rerunning ads on Facebook with a specific message targeting Republican senators. “I want to be able to show all Republican Senators a list of the many American voters that will NOT be happy if the wall isn’t built,” the ads said. “I need YOUR NAME on the list. Sign our Official Petition to the Senate now!” White House and congressional GOP aides said Friday that there was no concentrated effort on Capitol Hill to lobby Republicans to vote against the resolution of disapproval – reflecting a lack of serious concern that many Republicans would defy the president and join an effort to override his veto. In the House, at least 53 Republicans would be needed for a veto override, while 20 of 53 GOP votes would be necessary in the Senate. Josh Holmes, a former top aide to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said he expects the Senate to pass the disapproval resolution but said he sees little chance of 20 Republican senators breaking ranks. That, he said, could give “flexibility” to a few Republican senators to vote their conscience while the remainder of the party holds the line and protects the president’s agenda. Any political fallout, Holmes predicted, would be fleeting. “We had a record-setting government shutdown,” he said. “We’ve had a near-constant debate about the merits and demerits of a wall. I don’t think there is a single American voter who has not formulated an opinion one way or another on that issue. So what a vote would do that two years of daily discussion haven’t eludes me.” Rep. Joaquin Castro, D-Texas, who authored the one-page House resolution, said he would continue calling Republicans over the weekend to build support for the measure and that he was hopeful many would ultimately vote with Democrats to reject the emergency. “This is a historic power grab, and it will require historic unity by members of Congress, Republican and Democrat, liberal and conservative,” he said. With the measure ultimately likely to fail, Democrats are looking at other options to undermine Trump’s emergency declaration. The House Judiciary Committee has set a Thursday hearing on the matter, and Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., has invited White House Counsel Pat Cipollone and Justice Department officials to appear. None have yet confirmed their participation, a committee spokeswoman said Friday. Trump’s move is also being challenged in the federal courts, where several parties – including a coalition of Democratic-led states – have filed lawsuits to overturn the emergency. Pelosi said Friday that House committees continue to study whether the legislature itself could pursue legal action, but have reached no conclusions. “I’m not announcing anything today,” she said. The Washington Post’s Toluse Olorunnipa and Philip Rucker contributed to this report.
23 Feb 19
Plateau Daily News

Highlands varsity boys basketball team beat Blue Ridge in the first round of the LSMC tournament on Wednesday in Cashiers with a final 48-81. Photos by Brian O’Shea plateaudailynews@gmail.com Follow us on Instagram: @plateaudailynews Like us on Facebook HERE Purchase photos click HERE