Colorado

23 Mar 19
April Marble

Coyne, Decker Prove Hockey is for everyone Although the 2019 National Hockey League All Star game featured some of the best hockey players in the world, the stars of the weekend were the women who were the first to display their skill on the ice in what has been too long deemed a “man’s sport.”

23 Mar 19
DOCMARTIN1: It's Business and Personal

Every once in a while, Kathleen Parker writes an excellent editorial, maybe it is not her ability, but whether I agree with her. Yesterday was one of those days, where she wrote a poignant and informative review dealing with the Democratic Party’s problem with success. As I Was reading this article I got to thinking […]

23 Mar 19
Orange County Register
Poseidon officials, who’ve spent 21 years working toward approval of a controversial desalination plant in Huntington Beach, had a figurative bounce in their step as they emerged from yet another permitting agency meeting Friday. The Regional Water Quality Control Board remains months away from voting on one of the final two permits needed by Poseidon. But the fact the board staff detailed a specific timeline for the board’s permit process — with a final vote penciled in for Oct. 25 — was seen by Poseidon Vice President Scott Maloni interpreted that as a signal that board geologists, engineers and administrators are confident they can work through outstanding issues. “There’s a light at the end of the tunnel,” Maloni said. At one point, the water board expected to vote last year, but ongoing issues continued to delay the approval process for a project touted as a drought-proof answer to the area’s water needs. Details still to be worked out include how the $1 billion plant will extract water from the ocean and how to mitigate the environmental damage it causes. While the water board permit would be a big step forward, more approvals would be needed. Additionally, there continues to be opposition from both environmentalists and those concerned with the potential cost of Poseidon water. If Poseidon wins the Regional Water Quality Control Board permit, it would then need a California Coastal Commission permit and a final contract with the Orange County Water District. The district would buy most — if not all — of Poseidon’s water and distribute it to its member agencies. John Kennedy, the water district’s executive director of engineering and water resource, said that contract would likely include a contingency requiring the project win a multi-million dollar annual subsidy from the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California and purchase agreements from the water district’s member water agencies. Outstanding issues Poseidon’s item on Friday’s water board agenda focused primarily on the continuing issue of how water would be extracted from the ocean. A 2015 amendment to the state’s Ocean Plan says that desalination plants must use, if feasible, a subsurface intake system — that is, underground pipes extending beneath the ocean floor that suck seawater through the sand. That technology avoids the mortal threat to larvae, plankton and other small sea life when above-ground pipes take the water directly from the ocean. The Regional Water Quality Control Board had previously agreed with Poseidon that the state’s preferred subsurface approach was not technically feasible for all of the 107 million gallons of sea water the company is proposing taking into its plant each day. Given the geology of the area, the more costly subsurface intake could contaminate neighboring freshwater aquifers with saltwater and could draw down water from Huntington Beach’s two wetlands, state geologist Scott Seyfried reiterated to the board Friday. But Poseidon and the Regional Water Quality Control Board, assisted by Seyfried, have been examining a hybrid system that would use a combination of subsurface and direct intake. The preliminary conclusion is that just 3.5 percent of the 107 million gallons of seawater used daily could be extracted by a subsurface system without jeopardizing aquifers and wetlands, Seyfried said. But he added that the water boards’ engineers and geologists were still evaluating the possibility. And two environmentalist activists urged the board to more thoroughly scrutinize the viability of the subsurface intake at the site. “We don’t think there’s adequate information to make a decision at this time,” said OC Coastkeeper attorney Colin Kelly. He noted that while his group opposes the Poseidon project, it supports a proposal for a much smaller desalination plant — which would rely entirely on subsurface intake — just inland from from Doheny State Beach in Dana Point. Details also are still being worked out for how Poseidon would mitigate the environmental damage its plant would cause. The company has proposed paying for regular dredging of the Bolsa Chica Wetlands inlet, which has run out of funds previously set aside for that work. Additionally, water board analysts are still examining possible locations for direct intake pipes and the environmental impacts of the outflow of the brine to be discharged from the plant. Is it needed? While OC Coastkeeper was unsuccessful in its recent lawsuit to force an entirely new environmental impact report for the project, that group and other Poseidon critics have been buoyed in their opposition by a study last fall that ranked the Poseidon plant at the bottom of five water projects being pursued throughout the county. Faring much better in the analysis was the smaller Doheny desalination proposal. [cq comment=”The following content will display as an info box.”] Related links Poseidon prevails in desalination lawsuit Orange County water study updated, Poseidon desalination plant still scores low Poseidon desalination plant: What to know about its pros and cons for Southern California water Orange County officials give early approval to Huntington Beach desalination plant contract Tale of three desalination plants: Why the Doheny proposal is winning over some skeptics [cq comment=”This is the end of the info box.”] Besides using subsurface intake, the Doheny plant would serve a south Orange County area far more dependent on imported water than the north- and central-county region that would be the primary beneficiary of Poseidon water. If water from northern California and the Colorado River continues its current flow to Southern California, Poseidon water could end up costing customers nearly $400 million more than the imported water over the plant’s lifetime,  according to the study by the Municipal Water District of Orange County. The Poseidon plant could produce as much as 56,000-acre feet a year — enough for about 450,000 of the 2.5 million residents served by the Orange County Water District. But the analysis said that’s far more than north and central Orange County would need. In the best case scenario without the Poseidon plant, there would be no shortages there — and in the worst case, shortages of 22,000-acre feet annually. The report sites a series of smaller planned projects that could meet that projected maximum shortfall.
23 Mar 19
Daily Breeze
Poseidon officials, who’ve spent 21 years working toward approval of a controversial desalination plant in Huntington Beach, had a figurative bounce in their step as they emerged from yet another permitting agency meeting Friday. The Regional Water Quality Control Board remains months away from voting on one of the final two permits needed by Poseidon. But the fact the board staff detailed a specific timeline for the board’s permit process — with a final vote penciled in for Oct. 25 — was seen by Poseidon Vice President Scott Maloni interpreted that as a signal that board geologists, engineers and administrators are confident they can work through outstanding issues. “There’s a light at the end of the tunnel,” Maloni said. At one point, the water board expected to vote last year, but ongoing issues continued to delay the approval process for a project touted as a drought-proof answer to the area’s water needs. Details still to be worked out include how the $1 billion plant will extract water from the ocean and how to mitigate the environmental damage it causes. While the water board permit would be a big step forward, more approvals would be needed. Additionally, there continues to be opposition from both environmentalists and those concerned with the potential cost of Poseidon water. If Poseidon wins the Regional Water Quality Control Board permit, it would then need a California Coastal Commission permit and a final contract with the Orange County Water District. The district would buy most — if not all — of Poseidon’s water and distribute it to its member agencies. John Kennedy, the water district’s executive director of engineering and water resource, said that contract would likely include a contingency requiring the project win a multi-million dollar annual subsidy from the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California and purchase agreements from the water district’s member water agencies. Outstanding issues Poseidon’s item on Friday’s water board agenda focused primarily on the continuing issue of how water would be extracted from the ocean. A 2015 amendment to the state’s Ocean Plan says that desalination plants must use, if feasible, a subsurface intake system — that is, underground pipes extending beneath the ocean floor that suck seawater through the sand. That technology avoids the mortal threat to larvae, plankton and other small sea life when above-ground pipes take the water directly from the ocean. The Regional Water Quality Control Board had previously agreed with Poseidon that the state’s preferred subsurface approach was not technically feasible for all of the 107 million gallons of sea water the company is proposing taking into its plant each day. Given the geology of the area, the more costly subsurface intake could contaminate neighboring freshwater aquifers with saltwater and could draw down water from Huntington Beach’s two wetlands, state geologist Scott Seyfried reiterated to the board Friday. But Poseidon and the Regional Water Quality Control Board, assisted by Seyfried, have been examining a hybrid system that would use a combination of subsurface and direct intake. The preliminary conclusion is that just 3.5 percent of the 107 million gallons of seawater used daily could be extracted by a subsurface system without jeopardizing aquifers and wetlands, Seyfried said. But he added that the water boards’ engineers and geologists were still evaluating the possibility. And two environmentalist activists urged the board to more thoroughly scrutinize the viability of the subsurface intake at the site. “We don’t think there’s adequate information to make a decision at this time,” said OC Coastkeeper attorney Colin Kelly. He noted that while his group opposes the Poseidon project, it supports a proposal for a much smaller desalination plant — which would rely entirely on subsurface intake — just inland from from Doheny State Beach in Dana Point. Details also are still being worked out for how Poseidon would mitigate the environmental damage its plant would cause. The company has proposed paying for regular dredging of the Bolsa Chica Wetlands inlet, which has run out of funds previously set aside for that work. Additionally, water board analysts are still examining possible locations for direct intake pipes and the environmental impacts of the outflow of the brine to be discharged from the plant. Is it needed? While OC Coastkeeper was unsuccessful in its recent lawsuit to force an entirely new environmental impact report for the project, that group and other Poseidon critics have been buoyed in their opposition by a study last fall that ranked the Poseidon plant at the bottom of five water projects being pursued throughout the county. Faring much better in the analysis was the smaller Doheny desalination proposal. [cq comment=”The following content will display as an info box.”] Related links Poseidon prevails in desalination lawsuit Orange County water study updated, Poseidon desalination plant still scores low Poseidon desalination plant: What to know about its pros and cons for Southern California water Orange County officials give early approval to Huntington Beach desalination plant contract Tale of three desalination plants: Why the Doheny proposal is winning over some skeptics [cq comment=”This is the end of the info box.”] Besides using subsurface intake, the Doheny plant would serve a south Orange County area far more dependent on imported water than the north- and central-county region that would be the primary beneficiary of Poseidon water. If water from northern California and the Colorado River continues its current flow to Southern California, Poseidon water could end up costing customers nearly $400 million more than the imported water over the plant’s lifetime,  according to the study by the Municipal Water District of Orange County. The Poseidon plant could produce as much as 56,000-acre feet a year — enough for about 450,000 of the 2.5 million residents served by the Orange County Water District. But the analysis said that’s far more than north and central Orange County would need. In the best case scenario without the Poseidon plant, there would be no shortages there — and in the worst case, shortages of 22,000-acre feet annually. The report sites a series of smaller planned projects that could meet that projected maximum shortfall.
23 Mar 19
Spells

Spells for protection, healing, and more! … Our large group of mixed magic (Wicca Witchcraft, Voodoo, Vodou, Vodun, Hoodoo Root Workers, Santeria, and other) real spell casters are very … Our weight loss spell really works.- IN California Sacramento Los Angeles Colorado Denver Connecticut Hartford Bridgeport Delaware Dover Wilmington Florida Tallahassee Jacksonville Georgia Atlanta Hawaii Honolulu Idaho Boise Illinois […]

23 Mar 19
MyLegalHelpUSA

  FBI clashed with DOJ over potential ‘bias’ of source for surveillance warrant: McCabe-Page texts   March 22, 2019  By Gregg Re, Catherine Herridge     Just nine days before the FBI applied for a Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) warrant to surveil a top Trump campaign aide, bureau officials were battling with a senior Justice Department official who […]

23 Mar 19
Colorado Get Up

Thanks for joining me! Good company in a journey makes the way seem shorter. — Izaak Walton

23 Mar 19
currentseams

I’ve never fished the South Platte. I have no immediate plans to do so. But dammit, now I’ve read this book. And the gears are turning. Such is the power of the second edition of Fly Fishing Guide to the South Platte River. Although Pat Dorsey is listed as the author, contributors to the book […]

23 Mar 19

This Song Sparrow picked a lovely place, atop a blooming ceanothus bush on the north side of the park, to sing its greeting to the morning sun. In the video, I’ve edited out the silences. Between tweets, the bird is probably listening for responses from others of its kind. At the moment, it performed solo. […]

23 Mar 19
Nouvelles Du Monde

Le vendredi est le jour 2 de la campagne N.C.A.A. tournoi de basketball masculin. Suivez ici pour les scores et l'analyse en direct de qui gagne, qui perd et qui a brisé votre support. Comment regarder: CBS, TNT, TBS et TruTV diffuseront les jeux à partir de midi HE et un flux en direct est […]

22 Mar 19
Update News Portal

NHL.com has updated the fantasy hockey team power rankings based on the latest top 200, with added emphasis put on top 100 players. Other factors taken into account include rank of goalie(s) and power play, lineup and injury trends and overall upside and team security for standard leagues. Fantasy owners should use these rankings as […]

22 Mar 19
J. Adam Snow

Colorado — On Sunday, March 17, during an Italian professional soccer match between Napoli and Udinese, Napoli goalkeeper David Ospina dives to stop a shot in the 7th minute, and is kicked in the head on the way down. The game is put on pause for almost five minutes as Ospina receives treatment for a […]

22 Mar 19
The Denver Post
Colorado State Patrol and local police arrested 293 impaired drivers over St. Patrick’s Day weekend, a decrease from 2018 celebrations, the Colorado Department of Transportation announced in a news release Friday. Denver police recorded the most arrests of any city with 31 people getting citations, followed by Colorado Springs with 26 and Aurora with 15. The state patrol made 38 arrests. Law enforcement made 323 arrests for impaired drivers last year, the release said. Why the decline? CDOT pointed to its free ride-sharing offer, which provided rides to drivers who pledged not to drive impaired. More than 4,200 took the sober-driving pledge, CDOT said. [related_articles location=”right” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]