Colorado Mammoth

25 Mar 19
The Denver Post
Layovers can take your vacation from a relaxing “ahhhh” to a frustrated “argh” pretty quickly. Even if it’s just a short one, you still have the hassle of deboarding your original plane, running to your next gate, standing in line, boarding and getting all settled in again. If you’re looking for inspiration for your next vacation and you’re open-minded about where to travel, consider cities you can fly to directly from Denver. You’ll save time, but more importantly, a lot of hassle when all you have to do is hop on one plane and relax. Since Denver International Airport is adding new flights right and left, we checked in with them for some of the coolest new nonstop routes they’ve added in the last year or so. Here are 10 vacation-worthy destinations you can fly to from Denver — without a layover. (Editor’s note: Prices are averages and are subject to change) Grand Cayman, Cayman Islands Despite being completely landlocked, Colorado is home to the sixth-largest population of scuba divers in the country, so it makes perfect sense that there’s now a seasonal direct flight from Denver to Grand Cayman (round-trip flights starting at $396). The new flight, which launched in early March, takes roughly five hours, which is a huge improvement from the eight or nine hours it typically takes to get from Denver to Grand Cayman (however, the flights are currently on hold due to the grounding of Boeing 737 Max jets). If you want a vacation that blends relaxing by the pool with fun activities, consider the Kimpton Seafire Resort and Spa (nightly rates $399 and up), the island’s first new resort in a decade. Your stay includes access to kayaks, paddleboards, sailboats, water tricycles, rafts and snorkeling gear. Even better? The hotel will let you borrow a GoPro underwater camera to document all of your adventures. Mammoth Lakes, Calif. Start planning now for the next ski season: You can now fly direct from Denver to Mammoth Lakes, Calif., (round-trip flights starting at $392) during the winter months on United. This is a super-handy flight (and short, at just 2 1/2 hours), especially if you’re planning to get the Ikon Pass for the 2019-20 season, which includes unlimited access to Mammoth Mountain. With the Village Lodge as your home base (nightly rates $240 and up), you’ll have room to spread out and easy access to the gondola. Mammoth Lakes is also a beautiful place to cross-country ski and snowshoe — there are more than 140 miles of track to explore. You can also take snowcat tours, ride on a snowmobile and go ice skating. Portland, Maine Lobster on the brain? Catch a nonstop Frontier flight from Denver to Portland, Maine (round-trip flights starting at $177). This coastal town in southern Maine is not to be confused with the other Portland (you know, the one in Oregon). You’ll spend just four hours in the air, and then you can start chowing down on lobster rolls, lobster bisque, lobster steamed with butter — you get the picture. Food aside, Portland is also a great place to bike around, golf, kayak, fish and sail. There are picturesque lighthouses to explore, as well as historic homes and sites, such as the Portland Observatory, a maritime signal tower built in 1807. (United will also begin offering seasonal weekend flights from Denver to Portland starting this year). Zurich Perhaps a European vacation is more up your alley. You can fly nonstop to Zurich thanks to Edelweiss Air (round-trip flights starting at $1,349), which began offering seasonal direct flights between the two cities in June 2018. Zurich can serve as a good launchpad if you want to play in the Swiss Alps, but the city itself is also worth exploring. Get lost wandering around the cobblestone streets of Old Town (Altstadt), then pop into the 13th-century Gothic cathedral Fraumünster Church to see the gorgeous stained-glass windows designed by Marc Chagall. To take full advantage of Lake Zurich, book the hotel Baur au Lac (nightly rates $560 and up), which offers stunning views of the waters across its manicured grounds. You can stroll along the lake’s shores or see the sights from a boat tour. Savannah, Ga. If the hustle and bustle of daily life is dragging you down, a glass of sweet tea and a bowl of shrimp and grits might make you feel better. You can fly nonstop to Savannah, Ga., on a Frontier route (round-trip flights starting at $217) that launched in May 2018. This friendly southern city has so much history and character, you’ll want to give yourself plenty of time to explore. A few must-visit destinations: the SCAD Museum of Art, Forsyth Park and Bonaventure Cemetery, where you can learn all about the city’s history on a guided tour. The Owens-Thomas House and Slave Quarters museum explores the country’s complicated relationship with slavery while also offering a window into the architecture, design and customs of the late 1700s and early 1800s. Rather than check into a hotel, get a more full-fledged experience of southern hospitality when you stay at a small bed-and-breakfast, such as the Hamilton-Turner Inn (nightly rates $199 and up), which was built in 1873 and has just 17 rooms. Santa Rosa, Calif. If wine country is calling your name, you’re in luck. Hop on a quick three-hour flight from Denver to Santa Rosa (round-trip flights starting at $217) and you’ll be tasting delicious Sonoma County wines in no time. The nonstop flight to Santa Rosa is brand new — it launched March 8 — but it’s been in the works for a while. For a relaxing weekend away, consider MacArthur Place (nightly rates $399 and up), a historic ranch and vineyard that’s been converted into a charming resort complete with lush, green gardens. If you need a change of pace from tasting wine all day (though it’s unlikely), Sonoma County is also a great place to hike, bike, play golf, kayak and whale-watch. If you’re a movie buff, you may also want to visit the small town of Bodega, where Alfred Hitchcock filmed his 1963 thriller “The Birds.” Asheville, N.C. You may have heard that Asheville, N.C., is a lot like Colorado — it’s nestled against the Blue Ridge Mountains, there are lots of breweries and people love to play outdoors. In fact, Colorado brewery New Belgium and Oskar Blues (in nearby Brevard) have opened up tasting rooms and brewing facilities here. You can gauge for yourself whether Asheville feels like Colorado with direct flights from Denver on Allegiant (round-trip flights starting at $192). The trip takes fewer than three hours, so you can be mountain biking, hiking, paddleboarding and waterfall hunting in no time. Asheville also has a bustling live music scene, thriving farmers markets and a walkable downtown. Plus, it’s home to Biltmore, the truly impressive 8,000-acre estate built by George Vanderbilt. [related_articles location=”right” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] Paris Fall asleep in Denver, wake up in Paris — why not? Norwegian began offering direct flights between Denver and Paris (round-trip flights starting at $412) in April 2018, and since you’ll spend just nine hours in the air, you can hit the ground running once you arrive. Once you’ve hit up all the must-visit sites — the Louvre Museum, the Eiffel Tower, Notre Dame Cathedral and the Arc de Triomphe, just to name a few — consider exploring one of Paris’ lesser-visited neighborhoods. Belleville, for instance, is an area northeast of the city center that’s home to lots of artists, the tree-covered Parc de Belleville and many cafes and restaurants. RELATED: Dos and don’ts when traveling in Paris — or anywhere else, for that matter… Myrtle Beach, S.C. Myrtle Beach encompasses 60 miles of coastline along the Atlantic Ocean, which makes it a top choice for a beach vacation. Plus, it’s home to tons of beautiful golf courses, many designed by famous golfers such as Arnold Palmer and Jack Nicklaus. You can fly there nonstop from Denver (round-trip flights starting at $237), thanks to a route Frontier Airlines launched in May 2018. If you’re willing to go off the beaten path a bit, you can bask in the serenity of Brookgreen Gardens, a gorgeous 300-acre botanical garden that opened in 1931 as the first public sculpture garden in the country. Belize City, Belize OK, the nonstop flight to Belize City isn’t exactly new — direct service from Southwest (round-trip flights starting at $384) started in 2017 –  but it should be on your list anyway. Once you arrive, you can easily pay a visit to Altun Ha — the ancient Mayan ruins about 30 miles north of the city — or take a kayak or tube trip through one of Belize’s underground caves. You can also take a quick ferry ride over to Ambergris Caye, Belize’s largest island. This is where you’ll find relaxing beaches, world-class scuba diving sites and luxurious beachfront resorts such as the Victoria House Resort and Spa (nightly rates $695). Subscribe to our weekly newsletter to get outdoor news sent straight to your inbox.
25 Mar 19
The Mercury News
Insta-reaction to Pac-12 developments on and off the court (delayed one day to account for NCAA Tournament results) … 1. Nuance dominates. One week down, and the Hotline is ready to pronounce the NCAA Tournament a success for the Pac-12. And a failure. It’s both, and neither. It’s certainly not an abject failure given that Washington and Arizona State each advanced one round and Oregon made the Sweet 16 … and that expectations were in the gutter following the awful regular season. But it’s hardly an unqualified success given that the Huskies and Sun Devils weren’t competitive in their second game and that the conference advanced just one team to the Sweet 16 — same as the West Coast and American. From the weeds of the past five months, the Pac-12’s performance should elicit a sigh of relief. (Better than last year!) From the perch of history, however, the modest success shrivels in comparison to what it used to be … to what it should be. So there you have it: Not awful, not great, and largely dependent on perspective. 2. Oregon rolls on. The Ducks’ surge into the Sweet 16 comes as little surprise if you think back to November, when they were 14th in the AP preseason poll and in possession of a talented mix of newcomers and returnees, size and skill. Then came Louis King’s injury and Bol Bol’s injury and Kenny Wooten’s injury and Paul White’s injury and the search for an identity and the collapses against UCLA and the four losses in six games and the three losses in succession and the middle-tier finish and then … poof! … everything changed. They committed to winning with defense and to a bigger lineup. King found his rhythm and Payton Pritchard grew into the point guard Oregon always hoped he would be. For reasons stated above, the Ducks took much longer to coalesce than originally expected, but they had this kind of March charge in them all along, even without Bol Bol. They were absolutely as mediocre as they looked for many months, and they are absolutely as good as they’ve looked for the past three weeks. Those dueling Duck existences help define the Pac-12’s season on a larger scale. 3. Washington departs, oh-so-quietly. The Huskies were who we thought they were: A decent team that won a bad league, that clinched too early, that coasted into the postseason, that got run off the floor in two of its last three games and left a decidedly underwhelming taste in its wake. The cruelty of March: UW would have been better off as a No. 10 seed, avoiding the No. 1 in the second round. Instead, the Huskies were slotted into the 8-9 game and, as a reward for beating Utah State, drew an opponent they had no chance to beat. Sketch the worst possible matchup for UW, and it would wear Carolina blue. In addition to their advantages in size, skill, depth and overall talent, the Tar Heels are plenty familiar with the UW zone, having seen it a few weeks ago against Syracuse. They pummeled Syracuse on the boards en route to 93 points and did the same to Washington on their way to 81 (which could have easily been 91 … or 101). Undoubtedly, a few Huskies fans are left wondering about the fairness of the draw, about Oregon finishing five games back of UW but receiving an undeniably easier path into the Sweet 16. Um, yeah. 4. So does Arizona State. We knew the Sun Devils would have anything but a routine visit to the NCAAs — little about this team has been routine for the past five months. The only question was whether ASU would touch the ceiling with a lights-out performance before it went splat on the dance floor. There was no ceiling for coach Bobby Hurley’s team, only an erratic, mistake-filled victory over St. John’s in the First Four. Then came the flop. Yes, point guard Remy Martin was injured. Yes, Buffalo is one of the best 25 or 30 teams in the country. Yes, the travel was brutal: The Sun Devils arrived in Tulsa at 3 a.m. Thursday morning, then played Friday afternoon. Their legs were still in Dayton. Even accounting for the circumstances, the performance was disappointing. ASU was down 13 at halftime and 18 or 20 for most of the second half. (Two-year NCAA Tournament tally: Buffalo 180, Arizona and ASU 142.) It’s a reminder that every game counts, that even a late-December loss to Princeton or an early-February face plant against Washington State matters to the end-game. Win one of those — much less both — and ASU surely would have escaped the First Four and had an easier road into the second round, and the second weekend. All in all, we’ll grade the Sun Devils’ season a success. Their performance cannot be separated from the surrounding muck that was the Pac-12 — the second-best team in the conference wasn’t one of the 40 or 45 best in the country. But had you dangled second place, 23 wins and a visit to the round of 64 in front of the ASU constituency, no one would have complained. 5. Give that man a rai … err, never mind. Washington’s Mike Hopkins is no longer the best value in Pac-12 basketball. The Huskies took care of their two-time conference COY, handing Hopkins a new six-year deal worth $17.5 million on Thursday, the day before they opened NCAA play. That works out to $2.9 million per season, which vaults Hopkins to the top of the conference. Well, almost to the top. Utah’s Larry Krystkowiak remains the top-paid coach by a wide margin. Hopkins is No. 1 in the conference’s non-Krystkowiak wing. Here is an updated list with Hopkins’ new deal and the old compensation figures for Steve Alford, Ernie Kent and Wyking Jones, courtesy of USA Today’s salary database. Utah’s Larry Krystkowiak: $3.6 million Washington’s Mike Hopkins: $2.9 million Oregon’s Dana Altman: $2.8 million Arizona’s Sean Miller: $2.7 million UCLA’s Steve Alford: $2.65 million (dismissed) Arizona State’s Bobby Hurley: $2.4 million Oregon State’s Wayne Tinkle: $2.1 million Colorado’s Tad Boyle: $1.8 million Washington State’s Ernie Kent: $1.4 million (dismissed) Cal’s Wyking Jones: $1 million (dismissed) 6. Turnover at the top. The week brought earth-moving news at the top of the conference’s power structure, on two fronts: Longtime Oregon State president Ed Ray, one of commissioner Larry Scott’s staunchest supporters, announced he’s stepping down in the spring of 2020, at the end of his current contract. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”curated” curated_ids=”5952031,5945727,5949115,5926989″] At the same time, a new boss joined the conference: USC ended its endless search for a president by hiring Carol Folt, whose credentials include experience with a sandal-plagued athletic department. For the past six years, Folt has been in charge in Chapel Hill. Compared to the clean-up duty awaiting Folt at USC, navigating North Carolina through its mammoth academic fraud case was a lay-up. Ray’s departure and Folt’s arrival represent the latest instances of turnover at the president/chancellor level. Without Ray, only two CEOs remains from the group that hired Scott in 2009: ASU’s Michael Crow and UCLA’s Gene Block. The rundown, with date of appointment: Arizona State Michael Crow July 1, 2002 UCLA Gene Block Aug. 1, 2007 Colorado Phil DiStefano May 5, 2009 Oregon Michael Schill July 1, 2015 Washington Ana Mari Cauce Oct. 13, 2015 Washington State Kirk Schulz June 13, 2016 Stanford Marc Tessier-Lavigne Sept. 1, 2016 Arizona Robert Robbins June 1, 2017 Cal Carol Christ July 1, 2017 Utah Ruth Watkins April 2, 2018 USC Carol Folt July 1, 2019 Oregon State Ed Ray (outgoing) Nine of the 12 have changed out in the past four years, if you include Oregon State. The newcomers have entered a very difference conference from the one that existence at the time of Scott’s arrival. Why we need your support: Like so many other providers of local journalism across the country, the Hotline’s parent website, mercurynews.com, recently moved to a subscription model. A few Hotline stories will remain free each month (as will the newsletter), but for access to all content, you’ll need to subscribe. The good news for Hotline faithful: I’ve secured a discount: 12 cents per day for 12 months. Click here to subscribe. And thanks for your loyalty. *** Send suggestions, comments and tips (confidentiality guaranteed) to pac12hotline@bayareanewsgroup.com or call 408-920-5716 *** Follow me on Twitter: @WilnerHotline *** Pac-12 Hotline is not endorsed or sponsored by the Pac-12 Conference, and the views expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the views of the Conference.
24 Mar 19
The Province

Advancing to playoffs looks much more difficult now for the Vancouver Warriors after losing both ends of a weekend doubleheader to Colorado

24 Mar 19
National Post

DENVER, Pa. — Eli McLaughlin had four goals and eight assists and Kyle Killen scored five times as the Colorado Mammoth beat the Vancouver Warriors 14-4 on Saturday in National Lacrosse League action. Cory Vitarelli helped out with a pair of goals for the Mammoth (6-8) while Steve Fryer made 49 saves for the win. […]

24 Mar 19
Prolaxtalk

Box Score Attendance 12,826 The Mammoth used a seven goal second quarter to run away from the Warriors.  Eli McLaughlin led the Mammoth with four goals and eight assists. Steve Fryer got a rare start and made 49 saves for the Mammoth. Colorado improves to 6-8 and Vancouver falls to 4-10. Up Next March 30 […]

24 Mar 19
Colorado Lacrosse Report

Our live coverage of today’s game between Calgary and Colorado.

23 Mar 19
Cultural Foodies

Oahu has a surprisingly diverse range of flora with differing climate zones based on location and elevation. Throughout my travels I’ve been lucky to have hiked in some of the most stunning mountains in the world, including the Cascades in Washington, the Chautauquas in Colorado, The Andes in Ecuador, Gorges in Greece, and the Dolomites […]

23 Mar 19
The Province

The Vancouver Warriors are in chase mode now. The Warriors (4-9) go into a visit tonight to the Pepsi Center (6 p.m., Bleacher Report Live, http://www.sportsnet650.ca) to face the Colorado Mammoth (5-8) one win behind Colorado for the fourth and final playoff spot out of the National Lacrosse League’s West Division after losing 11-7 to […]

23 Mar 19
Lacrosse Bucket

In a week where we have seven games on the docket the action all got started on Friday night with three games on tab. Two were very exciting and one was a complete blowout where one team dominated the whole way.  Georgia 14, Toronto 5 The Georgia Swarm dominated the Toronto Rock from the opening […]

23 Mar 19
National Post

VANCOUVER — Ryan Lee scored four times and added three assists to lead the Colorado Mammoth past the Vancouver Warriors 11-7 on Friday in National Lacrosse League action. Jeff Wittig and Kyle Killen had two goals apiece for Colorado (5-8), while Eli McLaughlin and Jacob Ruest each had a goal and three assists. Cory Vitarelli […]

23 Mar 19
Prolaxtalk

Box Score Attendance 5,800 Ryan Lee led the Mammoth with four goals and three assists. Dillon Ward made 41 saves for the Mammoth. 5,800 in Vancouver to watch another Warriors loss. Warriors attendance continues to trend in the wrong direction, although it does not come as a surprise. Colorado improves to 5-8 and Vancouver falls […]

22 Mar 19
Calgary Sun

A handful of today’s Calgary Roughnecks would likely rather forget a particular spring day of 2014 in upstate New York. Trouble is those players are no doubt reminded of that National Lacrosse League championship final — and its 2-1 series heartbreaking loss — every time they hit the floor of Blue Cross Arena in Rochester. […]

21 Mar 19
The Province

“I think Beers has very good for awhile, but it feels like he’s even more consistent this year,” says Colorado coach Pat Coyle

20 Mar 19
greg g. SF, CA

Dreams come true. I was overweight and unathletic growing up, and as I grew taller and shed some weight, I gravitated toward mostly noncompetitive activities I could do solo, like windsurfing and skiing. I did not learn to ski until my 30’s, worked to become somewhat competent in the sport, then discovered snowboarding (the boots […]

20 Mar 19
Red Roll

J.R. Schramm, professionally known as Statik, is an electro-soul, bass-funky guitarist and audio engineer from Chicago, Illinois. Fusing an array of instruments together with coasting electronic beats, he creates an art that is unique among others in the scene. Statik has put out a collection of singles and 3 albums in his career; A Shift […]