Coolibar

20 Jul 19
Sophie Greenberg, M.D.

I’d like to think I look glamorous in my hat, big sunglasses, and long sleeve UV protective shirt, but they also allow me to enjoy the outdoors safely.  I recommend a wide brim hat for coverage of ears and neck that is labelled as UV protective.  Sunglasses protect eyelid skin, which is very thin and […]

15 Jul 19
City Country Beach

Living in the Northeast; we are so fortunate to have incredible beaches to drive to.  This week we are packing up for an exciting beach vacation on Long Island.  With it being just a car trip away;  I wanted to share my favorite items to pack up in the trunk for the little ones.  We […]

15 Jul 19
Raising A Little Gent

Ben and I did something crazy- we packed up our baby and dog and moved to Florida. Not only were we crazy enough to pick a spot on the map of Florida, apply for a job and find temporary housing through AirBnb- we moved in June, the hottest time of the year in the Sunshine […]

14 Jul 19
RobinReider

My Journey with EPP July 14, 2019 If you have watched the movie, The Madness of King George, you are familiar with the medical condition porphyria. There are eight types of porphyria, which have varying levels of severity. I knew [hoped] I was related to royalty somehow, and I eventually got the medical diagnosis to […]

11 Jul 19
Luxury with a History of Love

If choosing a sunscreen this day in age isn’t complicated enough, choosing a sunscreen feels impossible when you have sensitive skin. Not only are there a million different formulas for every body part, finish, and level of SPF, but there’s also the whole chemical-versus-physical debate. Daunting. Especially since everyone defines “sensitive” differently. “As a dermatologist, […]

03 Jul 19
fountainof30.com

There’s no denying the fact that we should be protecting our skin from the sun. Not only do the sun’s rays cause skin damage and wrinkles, they can be downright dangerous, especially if you have a family history of skin cancer. While we suggest you always wear sunscreen (it’s one of the keys to aging […]

27 Jun 19

VOICE OF THE HWY

The lazy, and sometimes crazy, days of summer are here! It’s time to power down the iPads, blow up the kiddie pool, and hop on the bikes. Summer is a time to have fun—and where there’s fun there are often accidents. Here are frequent seasonal mishaps, how to prevent them, and what to do should […]

11 Jun 19
Momalot

Summer means fun in the sun but it also means protecting your kids from sun, bugs and other potential hazards of summer.

11 Jun 19
Dresses for summer beach wedding guest

What’s your favorite water workout? TESTING CHEAP AMAZON LEGGINGS – $20 or LESS Then you need a pair of swim leggings. Yep, swim leggings or swim tights are totally a thing, and they’re the perfect addition to your swim wardrobe. They provide ample coverage during a water workout and are designed to help you move […]

07 Jun 19
Little Cat Posts

Summer is finally here! There are so many reasons to enjoy the warm air and beautiful sunshine, and most important, take care of your skin while doing so. My intense obsession with protecting my skin of sun damage and aging skin started when I was little. I was lucky because my Aunt was working at […]

06 Jun 19
Newsy Today

Halima Aden is still “scared” that she has been asked the issue of the lack of Performing Sports Addition this year. And not just because bikinis have not worn her. “I don't know how to swim!” The model tells 21 years of age for the Post. Halima Aden is the first Muslim model to be […]

06 Jun 19
News Archives Uk

A TANNING addict who started using solar benches in high school had to undergo 86 surgeries to contain his persistent skin cancer. Lisa Pace, 43, tanned every day when she arrived at the university. ten Lisa started tanning at school and since then she has had more than 80 skin cancer treatment operations.Credit: Facebook / […]

06 Jun 19
Nouvelles Du Monde

Halima Aden est toujours «choquée» d’avoir eu la chance de poser pour le numéro du maillot de bain Sports Illustrated de cette année. Et pas seulement parce qu’elle ne porte pas de bikinis. "Je ne sais pas nager!", A déclaré à The Post le mannequin de 21 ans. Halima Aden est le premier modèle musulman […]

06 Jun 19
The Irish Sun
A TANNING addict who started using sunbeds in high school has had to have 86 surgeries to contain her persistent skin cancer. Lisa Pace, 43, was tanning every day by the time she got to university. Lisa started tanning when she was at school and since then, has had over 80 skin cancer ops A sports coach, she says that there was no education around the dangers of tanning when she was growing up “I started tanning every day, or every other day”, she told Today. “It was addictive. People would say: ‘You look so good, you look tan’, and it just encouraged me.” She was first diagnosed with melanoma in 2000 aged just 23, after a routine health check led to her seeing a dermatologist. They found that Lisa had some small light brown spots which they wanted to get biopsied. And they found that she had skin cancer. She was first diagnosed at just 23, after a routine health check A dermatologist noticed that she had light brown patches of skin that turned out to be melanomas After leaving it a little while, Lisa went to a specialist for a second opinion and this time, they took a “huge amount” out of her thigh and calf. “I had stitches, bandages, bleeding, bruising, swelling, and I had crutches,” she recalled in a blog post for Coolibar, a company that sells UV protective clothing. “But the good thing was, they said they got it all. This meant no more skin cancer, so I thought.” Even after that, Lisa continued to tan. Even after her first diagnosis, Lisa continued to use sunbeds because she liked looking tanned “Tanning beds were popular. I had tanned a lot in college. There were all kinds of promotions with free lotions, buy five visits get five free, one month unlimited, etc. I enjoyed going.” Despite cutting down as she got older, the damage had already been done. According to the Melanoma Research Alliance, tanning beds increase your risk of melanoma by 75 per cent. [boxout headline=”Symptoms of melanoma”]The most common sign of melanoma is a new mole or a change in an existing mole. In most cases, melanomas have an irregular shape and are more than one colour. The mole may also be larger than normal and can sometimes be itchy or bleed. Look out for a mole which changes progressively in shape, size and/or colour. The ABCDE checklist should help you tell the difference between a normal mole and a melanoma: Asymmetrical – melanomas have 2 very different halves and are an irregular shape Border – melanomas have a notched or ragged border Colours – melanomas will be a mix of 2 or more colours Diameter – most melanomas are larger than 6mm (1/4 inch) in diameter Enlargement or elevation – a mole that changes size over time is more likely to be a melanoma Source: NHS [/boxout] Lisa, a college basketball coach, said: “I had no idea that the tanning bed was causing so much damage to my skin. “I never saw any TV commercials warning about tanning bed use and skin cancer, there were no social media platforms warning me of the danger and consequences”. In less than a year after her first surgery, Lisa found a white spot on her left cheek which had to be removed. “I was devastated. I couldn’t look at myself,” she wrote. “I spoke with my doctors and after much discussion, I found out that all those times going to the tanning bed had caused me to have skin cancer.” It was only after having facial surgery that the reality of her situation kicked in Despite quitting the sunbeds, the damage had been done and she went on to need many more surgeries She soon started finding spots all over her body, from her face to her legs. And she also developed two other types of skin cancer – squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma. At point one, she was having surgery for skin cancer every three months and by the time she was in her mid-30s, she had undergone 50 ops. Despite being knocked down 86 times, she said: “I got back up 87 times”. [boxout headline=”Symptoms of Basal and Squamous cell carcinomas”]Skin cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Non-melanoma cancers are more common than melanomas, with 100,000 new cases being diagnosed every year in the UK. The first sign of non-melanoma skin cancer is usually the appearance of a lump or discoloured patch on the skin that continues to persist after a few weeks, and slowly progresses over months or sometimes years. Melanomas, on the other hand, is often characterised by a mole. There are two common types of non-melanoma: Basal cell carcinoma (accounts for 75 per cent of skin cancers): usually appears as a small, shiny pink or pearly-white lump with a waxy appearance can also look like a red, scaly patch there’s sometimes some brown or black pigment within the patch the lump slowly gets bigger and may become crusty, bleed or develop into a painless ulcer Squamous cell carcinoma (accounts for the other 20 per cent): appears as a firm pink lump with a rough or crusted surface can be a lot of surface scale and sometimes even a spiky horn sticking up from the surface lump is often tender to touch, bleeds easily and may develop into an ulcer [/boxout] She now says that she always wears suncream and covers up when she’s outside At one stage, she was having an operation every three months “I know I’m going to win this battle” [article-rail-topic title=”MORE ON SKIN CANCER” term_id=”5277″ posts_number=”12″ /] She now always wears suncream, wears long sleeves and a hat if she goes outdoors and checks her moles every day. “I know I’m going to win this battle,” she wrote. “I know I do all the right things as far as protecting my skin and getting skin checks so I am confident in knowing skin cancer has met its match.” We pay for your stories! Do you have a story for The Sun Online news team? Email us at tips@the-sun.co.uk or call 0207 782 4368. You can WhatsApp us on 07810 791 502. We pay for videos too. Click here to upload yours
06 Jun 19
The Scottish Sun
A TANNING addict who started using sunbeds in high school has had to have 86 surgeries to contain her persistent skin cancer. Lisa Pace, 43, was tanning every day by the time she got to university. Lisa started tanning when she was at school and since then, has had over 80 skin cancer ops A sports coach, she says that there was no education around the dangers of tanning when she was growing up “I started tanning every day, or every other day”, she told Today. “It was addictive. People would say: ‘You look so good, you look tan’, and it just encouraged me.” She was first diagnosed with melanoma in 2000 aged just 23, after a routine health check led to her seeing a dermatologist. They found that Lisa had some small light brown spots which they wanted to get biopsied. And they found that she had skin cancer. She was first diagnosed at just 23, after a routine health check A dermatologist noticed that she had light brown patches of skin that turned out to be melanomas After leaving it a little while, Lisa went to a specialist for a second opinion and this time, they took a “huge amount” out of her thigh and calf. “I had stitches, bandages, bleeding, bruising, swelling, and I had crutches,” she recalled in a blog post for Coolibar, a company that sells UV protective clothing. “But the good thing was, they said they got it all. This meant no more skin cancer, so I thought.” Even after that, Lisa continued to tan. Even after her first diagnosis, Lisa continued to use sunbeds because she liked looking tanned “Tanning beds were popular. I had tanned a lot in college. There were all kinds of promotions with free lotions, buy five visits get five free, one month unlimited, etc. I enjoyed going.” Despite cutting down as she got older, the damage had already been done. According to the Melanoma Research Alliance, tanning beds increase your risk of melanoma by 75 per cent. [boxout headline=”Symptoms of melanoma”]The most common sign of melanoma is a new mole or a change in an existing mole. In most cases, melanomas have an irregular shape and are more than one colour. The mole may also be larger than normal and can sometimes be itchy or bleed. Look out for a mole which changes progressively in shape, size and/or colour. The ABCDE checklist should help you tell the difference between a normal mole and a melanoma: Asymmetrical – melanomas have 2 very different halves and are an irregular shape Border – melanomas have a notched or ragged border Colours – melanomas will be a mix of 2 or more colours Diameter – most melanomas are larger than 6mm (1/4 inch) in diameter Enlargement or elevation – a mole that changes size over time is more likely to be a melanoma Source: NHS [/boxout] Lisa, a college basketball coach, said: “I had no idea that the tanning bed was causing so much damage to my skin. “I never saw any TV commercials warning about tanning bed use and skin cancer, there were no social media platforms warning me of the danger and consequences”. In less than a year after her first surgery, Lisa found a white spot on her left cheek which had to be removed. “I was devastated. I couldn’t look at myself,” she wrote. “I spoke with my doctors and after much discussion, I found out that all those times going to the tanning bed had caused me to have skin cancer.” It was only after having facial surgery that the reality of her situation kicked in Despite quitting the sunbeds, the damage had been done and she went on to need many more surgeries She soon started finding spots all over her body, from her face to her legs. And she also developed two other types of skin cancer – squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma. At point one, she was having surgery for skin cancer every three months and by the time she was in her mid-30s, she had undergone 50 ops. Despite being knocked down 86 times, she said: “I got back up 87 times”. [boxout headline=”Symptoms of Basal and Squamous cell carcinomas”]Skin cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Non-melanoma cancers are more common than melanomas, with 100,000 new cases being diagnosed every year in the UK. The first sign of non-melanoma skin cancer is usually the appearance of a lump or discoloured patch on the skin that continues to persist after a few weeks, and slowly progresses over months or sometimes years. Melanomas, on the other hand, is often characterised by a mole. There are two common types of non-melanoma: Basal cell carcinoma (accounts for 75 per cent of skin cancers): usually appears as a small, shiny pink or pearly-white lump with a waxy appearance can also look like a red, scaly patch there’s sometimes some brown or black pigment within the patch the lump slowly gets bigger and may become crusty, bleed or develop into a painless ulcer Squamous cell carcinoma (accounts for the other 20 per cent): appears as a firm pink lump with a rough or crusted surface can be a lot of surface scale and sometimes even a spiky horn sticking up from the surface lump is often tender to touch, bleeds easily and may develop into an ulcer [/boxout] She now says that she always wears suncream and covers up when she’s outside At one stage, she was having an operation every three months “I know I’m going to win this battle” [article-rail-topic title=”MORE ON SKIN CANCER” term_id=”5277″ posts_number=”12″ /] She now always wears suncream, wears long sleeves and a hat if she goes outdoors and checks her moles every day. “I know I’m going to win this battle,” she wrote. “I know I do all the right things as far as protecting my skin and getting skin checks so I am confident in knowing skin cancer has met its match.” We pay for your stories! Do you have a story for The Sun Online news team? Email us at tips@the-sun.co.uk or call 0207 782 4368. You can WhatsApp us on 07810 791 502. We pay for videos too. Click here to upload yours